Mariner Outboards...any good?
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Thread: Mariner Outboards...any good?

  1. #1
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    I just bought a friends boat with a 1994 200 Mariner outboard. I've always had Yamaha or Johnsons and was wondering the pros and cons of this motor. It is in great shape, but I remember a constant shrill alarm would come on every once in awhile when we were running at almost full throttle last year. He would just shut it down, wait a couple seconds, and restart it and we would take off again. Sometime it would come on again, and other times it would'nt. I think it may be a water pump/ cooling problem. I'm taking it in for service Monday and will have a new water pump installed and a full tune up. Should I ask the mechanic to check anything else in particular? Lower unit oil and fuel seperator have been replaced already by myself. Thanks

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  3. #2
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    Oops....sorry, I meant to post this on Tackle Box.

  4. #3
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    I canot say any thing bad about those motors , I have never personally had them, Sorry [img]smile.gif[/img]

    [ 05-15-2004, 04:17 AM: Message edited by: canyon caster ]
    IN MEMORY OF CASTAWAY RAY...

  5. #4
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    Those engines are Mercurys with a grey cowling. If you like Merc you'll ike them. Mine had the same problem last year. Usually it's not a serious problem. I believe mine was a clogged oil line. Takae the cap off your oil tank and check out the screen. If it is gunked up clean it. New water pumps is a good idea also.

  6. #5
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    I have a 1989 200 hp mariner and I would not trade it for a new one at this point... good running engine and easy to work on...get yourself a clymer manuel and do the water pump yourself takes only two hours if you have minimal skills.. All i do to mine is change the water pump and thermostats (there are two of them) change the plugs and fluids. I have not had any problem in the last three seasons .... the parts on a water pump cost about 50.00 to do it yourself and the mechanic gets about 250.00 you do the math. oh yeh the first thing you do when changing a water pump is to drain out the lower unit oil so you will have to do that again.....
    (VERN)
    AL RICHER
    MULLICA HILL,NJ

  7. #6
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    I HAD THE SAME PROBLEM WITH A NEW 150 JOHNSON LAST YEAR,WHEN YOU TURNED OVER 4200 RPM THE ALARM WENT OFF SLOW DOWN AND IT STOPPED. THE HOSE FROM THE TANK TO THE ENGINE WAS BAD THEY FIXED IT REAL QUICK.
    WHAT ALL BUT ABOUT 6 BARNERS BELIEVE
    DALLAS SUCKS



  8. #7
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    Finaddict5, you need to determine just what sets off an alarm on that engine. That alarm was installed by the manufacturer to prevent damage.

    For example, it may have sensors that monitor: Cylinder temperature, water flow pressure drop, vacuum losses in the fuel line, and loss of flow in the oil line. Obtain a factory manual and study the problem.

    Running at almost full throttle resulting in an alarm sounding, sounds like a loss of proper fuel flow, which probably affects oil mixture. Most engines have a monitor in the fuel line to detect a loss in efficient vacuum (read fuel delivery)...which sets off an alarm, or even slows the engine.

    Keep in mind that a vacuum leak will happen much easier than a pressure leak. In other words, in a pressure leak, the viscosity of a fluid has to be overcome in order for a leak to occur. In a vacuum leak, thin air is drawn in....a much easier thing to accomplish. People look for fluids to show in a leak, often forgetting a vacuum leak often will not show any fluid losses. A vacuum leak can upset an engine to the point of burning a hole in a piston dome.

    If the alarm is sounding due to a temperature rise, the heat gauge should reflect that, assuming there is one and it is properly calibrated and in working order. I would say if you have no temp gauge, one needs to be installed. Mariner is Mercury, and Mercury in many models favored water pressure gauges over temp gauges. What I am suggesting is, if the alarm is due to improper cooling, some form of monitoring that should be in your gauge array.
    \"The fastest draw is having the gun already in your hand\"<br /><br />RFA,NRA & other stuff

  9. #8
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    Thanks to all. Sounds like it may take a little more detective work than I had hoped. Have an appt. Monday to get her checked out. New water pump, tune up and whatever it needs. I'll tell the mechanic to give it a "thorough" check up and hope the alarm goes off while he is fixing it.

  10. #9
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    Are you sure that is not your over rev alarm. check the tach and make sure you are not over revving the engine.
    "Reel A-Lure"
    member RFA, MSSA

  11. #10
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    i HAD A 1982 GRADY wHITE with that had a Merc that went south. I bought a 150 Mariner. I ran it for 2 years without a birp. That engine would start before the key was turned. It was a great engine. I had slipped the boat on the maurice River for the season at a marina to be named later. We had a real bad storm thatkicked up for a couple days. The Grady was the style with a motor well in front of the engine. The boat took a couple waves over the stern while tied up and down she went. Marina never called me. I went down to check her out after the storm and the bow was up and the ropes were the only thing keeping her from going down all the way. Anyhow I was sick. New motor and all. Anyway I pulled her out and washed the entire engine out Pulled the plugs and cranked her over alot. New plugs and fired her up real easy. I ran the s--t out of that boat for 3 more years. When you took the cover off there wasnt a spot of salt or corrosion on a bolt,nut anywhere. The motor always started on a dime even after the mishap. So I would buy a Mariner anyday.
    Capt Larry <br />\"No Quarter\"<br />38\' Ronin Convertible

  12. #11
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    Thanks for all the tips guys. I took her to Ski's Marine in Westville next to Eddie@J&B Boats on the Delsea Drive.He is going to give it a good going over along with H2Opump and full tuneup. I told him the original problem an he will check it all out. I gave him the green light to give it whatever it needs. I'm grateful to all and feel pretty confident about Mariner after reading your posts. Thanks again!

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