Holly Tree Wood - OK to Burn?
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Thread: Holly Tree Wood - OK to Burn?

  1. #1
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    Default Holly Tree Wood - OK to Burn?

    I just cut down a very large holly tree and there is a good amount left over that wouldn't fit into the chipper. Can it be used as firewood? One neighbor opined that it has too much sap like a pine tree. It seems more like dense hardwood, like a locust. Can I use this, split and seasoned, in the fireplace or should I find a way to dump it? Thanks.
    The "Dan"Forth
    Sundog Marina, DE Bay

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  3. #2
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    I have burned it before, both in the woodburning stove and the campfire with no adverse effects.

    It is really tough to cut and split.

  4. #3
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    Should be fine to burn...a friend of mine's father turned a bunch of wooden meat tenderizer mallets out of holly he'd cut a bunch of years ago. They've been pounding veal, chicken and pork at his catering company with them for years and they've barely worn. Seems to be pretty dense and tough stuff.

    "Our math shows that the bird is equal to, or greater than, the word"

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    Just did a quick google search for "holly + firewood" and found that it is actually a very desirable firewood, known for it's long lasting fires.

    Also stumbled across a bit of trivia... the original Yule logs were logs from a holly tree

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    In Celtic Tradition It is felt to be unlucky to fell a holly tree or burn the green skinned holly.


    "My work is done, Why wait"

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    You can burn any wood, even pine, if you season it long enough.

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    Thanks for the replies. I know how tough that wood is. This is the 2nd big one I cut. I forget what we did with the other tree's logs .

    It's not only tough to cut, but it's heavy as hell .
    The "Dan"Forth
    Sundog Marina, DE Bay

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob ECT
    You can burn any wood, even pine, if you season it long enough.
    Growing up I was always told that pine was a big no-no, as it was too sappy and would lead to creasote buildup in the chimney.

    As I travel around the country, I was surprised to learn that most of this country burns pine regularly. It isn't a great wood because it burns fast, but it does burn

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    Pine is great to get a fire going. It burns hot but doesn't produce a lot of coals so I ususally start adding harder woods before the fire reduces.

    Just burn your stove or chimney hot for at least a 1/2 hour and you'll burn up most of the creasote.

    Many parts of North America and northern Europe have nothing but pine trees. They've been staying warm for a few thousand years.

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    Seasoned pine split small makes great kindling.

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