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Thread: New to Fly Fishing

  1. #1
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    Question New to Fly Fishing

    Just started with a 4/5 weight cheapie for the freshwater by me.

    What weight should I get from Stripers/Blues?

    How about for bft in the 40-80lb range?

    What type of flies should I purchase?

    Also what backing/line on each of the above mentioned rigs?
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  3. #2
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    Bass and blues from a boat, 8wt, for the surf 9wt.

    Bft 14wt

    Your going to want gelspun (power pro) backing on both. Striper line - at least 150yrds-200yrds is good, but I put on as much as possible.

    BFT - 500 yrds of 50-65lb PP is about good or atleast avergae for most large setups..
    Remember to spell check.


  4. #3
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    Default Rods/Reels

    For Stripers/Blues on a boat I'd opt for at least a 9wt probably 10wt. I fish an 8wt quite a bit, but I have 9's and 10's on board as well. The problem with an 8 is that if you get a larger Bass/Blue, you'll be fighting that fish far to long, just can't put the heat to them with an 8wt. With an 8wt. you'd be hard pressed to cast some of the heavier sinking lines that are sometimes required to get down to the fish. Particularly in any kind of current, like the rips. You'd as well, be hard pressed to cast any fairly large flies, sometimes what's required to get into the larger bass. An 8wt is a blast but wouldn't be my choice for a first saltwater rod.
    For Tuna's, 12-13-14 wts. I've caught yellow fin in that size range with a 13 wt. When you get to the 14wt and even higher weights they're ridiculas to cast. Sometimes on Tuna it's nothing more than a roll cast into a chunk line, but sometimes you'll need to be able to throw a fly and a little line. Couple that with the fact that oft times on a Tuna trip you'll possibly run into Wahoo, Marlin and even swords at night, get a rod that can be cast. As far as flies go for the offshore predators, big deceivers that imitate Butterfish, mackeral, baby Mahi etc. There's a whole line of flies for that stuff.
    Reels, for the 9-10wt, not as important, most reasonable reels will suffice. Look into the Colton outfits that are on the Barn. They're more than sufficiant, reasonably priced and many of us are pleased with the product.
    Reels for Tuna's, another story. I'd insist on top end. Abel, Pate, Orvis Vortex. I'm not saying that Colton doesn't offer a big game reel, I just haven't tried one. I've seen reels of lesser quality literaly come apart on big Bluefin. The reel needs to have a silky smooth drag. As far as backing goes, I prefer Guidabrod Hi-Vis gel spun. Why gel spun? Several reasons, you can put an enormous amount of backing on,(for long runs), with the ultra fine diameter you can pull out 200yds of line and your spool diameter won't significantly decrease, this is important when that Tuna turns and starts running at the boat. You'll want to be able to make up as much line per turn as possible. Remember, there's no gear ratio on a fly reel. Another reason is line diameter and line drag. Get 200 yds of backing and a fly line in the water and that fish is dragging a lot of load at the tippet. A fine backing reduces this load considerably by slicing thru the water like a razor blade. High visability comes into play when the captain is trying to chase or back down on a very big fish. He can see easily where that fish is headed.
    Word to the wise, terminal rigging for big game is a little involved. When you get to that point, post a question about favorite terminal set ups that guys are using.
    If you need someone to go out with you for Tuna, that have the correct gear, post this as well, you'll have a few that would be happy to bring the correct set ups, flies etc and show you the ropes. Myself included. A day with an experianced big game fly angler will cut your learning curve dramaticly. It's much easier to show someone all the nuances involved rather than try to write it.
    Good luck. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by Flyguy784; 04-16-2008 at 09:53 AM.
    John Yank

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  6. #4
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    John

    If you dont publish you should consider doing so, very helpful read for me too.

    Thanks
    John S.

  7. #5
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    Hey AJ,

    I would start with a 9 weight outfit. I still believe the 9 weight is the bread and butter rod for the salt.

    I'd be happy to set you up with a 9 weight combo at one of my bassbarn specials. Can even outfit it with whatever line and backing you prefer.

    The website is www.coltonfly.com

    570-832-4362 office
    [email protected] email

    Hope to hear from you!

    Tight lines, Bob

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  8. #6
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    AJ,
    One thing I didn't see mentioned was casting lessons. They will shorten your learning curve, and vastly increase your enjoyment of fly fishing. The mechanics are completely different than conventional or spin fishing, it takes some practice.
    FFF has excellent instructors, you can find one near you here:

    http://www.fedflyfishers.org/Default.aspx?tabid=4465

    Harry
    The only thing worse than an illegal immigrant is the American that hires him....

    If guns cause crime, all of mine must be defective. - Ted Nugent

  9. #7
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    Default the spike or not the spike,that is the question

    I agree with john. it is good solid advise and if you ever get the chance to fish with him , make it happen you'll learn something no matter how long you been doing this thing.

    9 wt or 10 wt take your pick, that is a choc vs vanilla debate. if you fish in a boat all the time a 9 works great and doesn't beat you up. if you walk the beach or hump a jetty than you need all the blasting power you can get from a 10. also on the jetty or some parts of the beach you can't move and back down a big fish, your diging your heals in and playing tug of war you need the lifting power of the bigger rod.

    Another way of looking at your question is that your looking to outfit your self for the entire range of saltwater flyfishing. therefore you would get the most for your buck to start with a 8wt and 10wt and 12 wt and 14 wt. when you get all that gear and the flies and riggings, then you can start filling in the gaps, buying back-up rods. getting rods of differnt actions and the back-up for that rod, then there is the reels and all of the extra spools and don't forget those fly lines. Welcome to the jungle. If your looking for a cheap hobby you might want to try heroin addiction.
    Nullum gratuitum prandium

  10. #8
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    Oh yeah..if your going to get into this for real than you must find a flyshop you like, travel around and don't be afraid to ask questions if they are less than thrilled to help you go elsewhere. find some guys you like and are into what your into and you will learn. TAKE CASTING LESSONS, if you are an experienced conventional takle angler than you will benifit from some lessons because you are going to have to train yourself to do some stuff that will feel unnatural. And when you get your first real good fish on a flyrod you will know why you put up with all the crap.
    Nullum gratuitum prandium

  11. #9
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    AJ,
    there is nothing I have to add here, except listen to the people that have answered ahead of me. I have found there are personal likes and dislikes, meaning that there is more than one way to do this, and do it well. The guys that have answered before me, have given me a world of knowledge.

    The only suggestion I have is to go back in the posts in this forum, over the last 6 months, and you will find a wealth of knowlwedge.

    Oh, and one last thing, when you are tying your leaders, or any knots, coat them with UV Knotsense for durability
    Pete


    1970 402c.i. 375hp, 4:11 rear end.

    NOW THAT'S A RIDE!!


    use UV Knotsense always

  12. #10
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    Oh, and one last thing, when you are tying your leaders, or any knots, coat them with UV Knotsense for durability__________________
    Pete

    Glad to see somebody's listening. How are ya Pete? Anxiouly awaiting the arrival of the bass I'll bet.
    John Yank

  13. #11
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    Good John,
    I was in PA for a few days, and had the closing on the house. So I am officially gone from PA. What a load off my mind!

    I have been doing all my knots with knotsense. Actually, I just got the big light from loon mountain. 3 LED's, cures it quick.

    The bass have not really shown up yet. I hear that there are some at the west wall in Charlestown. I keep checking the herring run creeks, and have not seen them yet, but it could just be a matter of days now
    Pete


    1970 402c.i. 375hp, 4:11 rear end.

    NOW THAT'S A RIDE!!


    use UV Knotsense always

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