Looking for some help, Advice!
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Thread: Looking for some help, Advice!

  1. #1
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    Default Looking for some help, Advice!

    I have a 9' 8/9 wt. St. Croix with a 8/9 scientific angler reel. Yesturday I went to tackle direct to buy some sinking line. I ended up with a line that has a sink rate of 1.7-2.0. I am a beginner and want to fish from my boat around cold spring inlet. I have been catching bass and blues at the jetty on my baitcaster with bombers. My question is did I buy the correct line for fishing from my boat at the jetty and what kind of flies should I be using? I have some poppers, clousers, and deceivers mostly in chartruese or white/chartruese. Chartruese is my first color choice around here. I have been practicing casting in the yard and I can cast 50-60 feet with a little accuracy. I have always watched people fly fish and thought i would like to be able to do it.

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    It will work and you will catch, not the ideal choice. A 300 to 500 grain line will work better especially if it is windy, which seems like it is most of the time you want to fish. Plus if you want to get your fly down a bit deeper the heavier sinking line will get it down faster. This is important when there is a lot of current.

    Most important would be an electric bow motor. You will find running your engine and trying to turn your wheel and shift your engine while trying to fly cast will gets old fast, plus you will not spook the fish.

    Clousers and deceiver will work around the rocks and in the back .

    That line should be good for working shallow water in the back bay. Again you will have the problem of the motor spooking fish. You will probably do better drifting the best you can. When fishing in 5 feet or less of water the motor running is not going to be good.
    Last edited by CapeMayRay; 07-18-2011 at 10:34 PM.

  4. #3
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    Ray, thanks for the info. When I put the line on the reel I had the feeling it wasnt heavy enough. But being a beginner I didn't really know. Can you tell me exactly which line I should buy and where to buy it , I don't want to buy another $70 line that is not correct for the application. I see you fishing the jetty a lot and wanted to say hi, but I know you are working. Sunday morning was good nobody around.
    Thanks again for the info.
    Don

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    I like and have used sinking lines by a number of manufacturers and found they all worked for me. You might have to look on the inter-net to find what you want. I have had a number of Teeny Lines and liked them. I have 300, 350, 400, 500 grain lines and they all work well. I think a 300 to 350 should be good for most situations and they cast very well into the wind. With a sinking line you just take one backcast and let it fly and you are good to go.

    Right now you should be able to catch on the intermediate that you have without any problems.

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    Don Next time at Tackle direct talk to Doug H. & let him know what you want to do. He knows of what he speaks.
    Ron Conner
    MODERATOR SALT WATER FLY FISHING FORUM
    release the fish, keep the memories. Once a Knight is enough. Sparse

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    Quote Originally Posted by sparse grey View Post
    Don Next time at Tackle direct talk to Doug H. & let him know what you want to do. He knows of what he speaks.
    That is who I got my line from, maybe they didn't have any sinking line. He seemed very knowledgable and was happy to help me. He is also my foreman's brother inlaw.

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    Does it matter if the fly line is made for saltwater, or is a 300 grain line the same whether fresh or salt.

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    nah- no difference between any of the sinking lines... some use a floating running line,and some use an intermediate running section....some prefer the intermediate type because they tend to get down a little deeper.

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    Do all sinking fly lines have a sinking tip and then a floating section. The ones that I am looking at are 300 grain with a 24' sinking tip and total length around 80'-100'.

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    Default Looking for help

    All sinking fly lines do not have sink tips- Differance is that the T type sink tip first not sink as a full sinking line. They are in my opinion the best choice for a lot of uses including saltwater due to the fact they sink tip first and can get you fly deeper to feed zones, especially in currents & tides. The full sinking lines will sink as described & are OK for lesser current applications or casting to surface bound fish on the feed.
    The full sink lines can be cast as a normal WF line , the T type invoke the shooting head style of cast. Less work more distance ,deeper quicker to cover more water. Different fisheries require different line choices that's why it's good to have a couple to meet needs at given times! It all varies based on a lot of cicumstances .
    Both have certain applications for salt, but if I was going to fish boat off the beach & in currents , w/depth, I would opt for the T style as my go to line for a lot of reasons.
    As a neophyte caster the std sink line might be eassier to learn to cast & load the rod due to it actually being a WF with a somewaht shorter front taper than most T types which in essence are shooting heads connected to a running line ! Totally different casting style here.
    In wind conditions it always better to downsize your line one size ,less air resistance or learn to low backhand cast to overcome the breeze in your face!
    It all takes time, get someone in the know to get you started correctly, bad habits are hard to overcome over time.
    Capt Lou

  13. #11
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    All great info here.You may consider buying a spare spool. one for interm. and one for full sink. I like the shooting head. easy to cast and manage.

    Short (2-4 feet) flourocarbon leader and like CMR, I use a snap to connect the fly to the leader..

    Also get/make a stripping basket or get a small mesh net and lay it on the deck. It will keep the line from catching on cleats and stuff..

    Trolling motor is a plus. otherwise plan your drifts accordingly and turn off the motor.

    GOGETEM!

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