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Thread: Thoughts on lines

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    Default Thoughts on lines

    I have an Okuma Integrity with 9wt floating line and need line for a spare spool. From a previous thread it was suggested I should have a sinking type line. I'll be fishing the beach and jetties several times a year unless I really get into it. I'd like to fish the bay but I don't know any spots yet. As of now I'm looking more to catch schoolies, snappers, weakies and maybe flounder. What are your thoughts on the following lines.

    Hardy Mach 2 Intermediate Sinking Fly Line DT9I Hardy Mach 2 Intermediate Sinking Fly Line WF9I
    RIO STRIPED BASS FLYLINE WF10INTERMEDIATE LUMALUX/CLEAR

    Orvis Generation 3 Wonderline Fly Line WF10I Intermediate
    RIO Striper 250 Grain 26 FT. Coldwater Density Compensated Sinking-Tip Fly Line

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    That's a tuff call in your situation. I guess I'd have to say an intermediate might be best for you. Only because you don't get out much. If it were me, I'd throw a 350 grain line on that thing and go. You didn't say what rod you have. It's action might dictate a 300 grain line. I use Rio and Orvis. Almost exclusevly the Gen III Orvis lines now. The problems with a high sink rate line is getting used to casting them and they're meant to get to the bottom. If you don't get out enough to learn how to control that, the line will be ineffective or you'll be hung up all the time. So, get an intermediate for now. If you really get into it, get a heavier line, it'll give you alot of versatility, once you know how to utilize it.
    John Yank

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    John is right on as usual, intermediate is what I like unless u need to stay on bottom or in deeper then let's say 15 feet. I like the airflow inter. the orvis depth charger 350. Good luck and tight lines!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyguy784 View Post
    That's a tuff call in your situation. I guess I'd have to say an intermediate might be best for you. Only because you don't get out much. If it were me, I'd throw a 350 grain line on that thing and go. You didn't say what rod you have. It's action might dictate a 300 grain line. I use Rio and Orvis. Almost exclusevly the Gen III Orvis lines now. The problems with a high sink rate line is getting used to casting them and they're meant to get to the bottom. If you don't get out enough to learn how to control that, the line will be ineffective or you'll be hung up all the time. So, get an intermediate for now. If you really get into it, get a heavier line, it'll give you alot of versatility, once you know how to utilize it.
    Here is a link about the blank my rod was made from:
    http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/produ...out/basket.jsp

    John, here is a quote from a previous thread by you about my rod and line types. You were responding to what type of second line I should get.
    "Rob is right, a full sink. An intermediate is just such a slow sink rate it doesn't buy you a ton compared to that floating line. My guess for that rod would be a 300 grain line, I prefer a 350 gr on my 9 wt but it's a Scott STS. Has a faster action than your rod."

    I'm kinda torn. The Hardy Mach 2 is only $19.99 and the Orvis is $35.
    Last edited by Allejo; 04-01-2013 at 09:46 PM.

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    Well, that's why I say it's tuff in your situation. I'm baseing my thoughts on what you've said in this thread. I'd guess in your last post you merely said you were interested in getting another line to augment your set up.

    "On the beach or jetty several times a year".......See, here's the deal, a fast sinking line ie 300 or 350 takes some getting used to. If you got a 350 grain for your 9wt. On the beach, you'd be dragging that thing across the sand constantly, you just don't, in most cases, have the depth there to warrent the fast sink.

    On the jetty, I'd suspect, you'd have that new fast sink line wrapped up in the rocks every third or fourth cast. I also suspect you'd not be at the end of the jetty in fast current, casting 80 feet into 18 feet of water. That's were I'd have that 350, but I know how it reacts in different conditions, different current flows and directions, and how to keep it, via line manipulation and strip speed, and when and how to end that retrieve so it doesn't get hung up in the rocks constantly. They take some time to get used to.


    If, as you say, you end up fishing the bay, from the shore line I'm guessing, at most locations you'll be casting what, about 60-70 feet. You'll be in 4 or 5 feet of water. Any fish, except flounder, will be thru out that shallow water column. Certainly with the intermediate you'll be able to catch. With a fast sink line, you'd be dragging it across the bottom and snagging more crap than you might think and beating that line up.


    I guess what I'm trying to get across is, if you are really serious about fly fishing the brine get a fast sink. If you're going to be an occaisional fly angler you won't appreciate the issues you will have with the more specialized line. They are great tools but as I've said, they take time to get used to. You'll catch plenty of snapper blues and schoolies with an intermediate line and avoid all the problems of the fast sink.


    Looking at your rod; it's hard to say what FS would be good, you'd probably be ok with the 300 on that stick. It's soft and slow. Sounds more like a flats rod blank than a 15 knot wind, crashing surf rod blank.


    I don't know the Hardy lines you mentioned. I do like Orvis Gen III lines.


    Sorry to be confusing. As I said, it's just tuff for the casual angler to get used to those fast sink lines. If you had said, "I really want to get into this and I'm going to put in the time to get good at it" I'd tell ya to get the 300. When you say, "several times a year", that's a different story. Most of us, during the season, get out a couple times a week! As I already said, get an intermediate for now. If you really get into it, get the fast sink line, you'll know when you need it. They're not all that expensive and you'll appreciate having a collection of lines for various conditions and locations.
    John Yank

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    Thanks for the reply John. I hope you didn't get the impression I was second guessing you or accussing you of contradicting yourself.


    I went with the Orvis Gen 3 intermediate based on your advice. I can always get a full sink later. I do a fair amount for freshwater fly fishing in my locak creeks but I definately don't need the hassle of learning multiple types of line during my limited time at the beach.

    I researched to the Hardy lines more and found they were designed for salmon and spey rods. They weren't really what I need.
    Last edited by Allejo; 04-02-2013 at 08:52 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Allejo View Post
    Thanks for the reply John. I hope you didn't get the impression I was second guessing you or accussing you of contradicting yourself.


    I went with the Orvis Gen 3 intermediate based on your advice. I can always get a full sink later. I do a fair amount for freshwater fly fishing in my locak creeks but I definately don't need the hassle of learning multiple types of line during my limited time at the beach.

    I researched to the Hardy lines more and found they were designed for salmon and spey rods. They weren't
    Brother I got news for ya, I fished a intermediate line for the first 5-6years and caught every species on the list from jetties,beach,boat river,ect. didn't even know what a sink line was till I went up to the cape and now your dealing with 10-12ft tides and ripping water. Here's the bottom line , you can fish any fly u want with a inter. even poppers if u get on the line quick, it is the best suited line for saltwater fly fishing. The sink line has its moments, DEEP water and current... sorry if I came off like a *** but this is not rocket science. and its a pain to cast if you have no experience with a flyrod and controlling the line . Good luck get out there , my first Bass I swear on my mothers grave was on my first cast on a white deceiver. once you feel that take or a bass surfaces to crush you fly right as your taking it out the water , YOUR HOOKED! o yeah one more thing, pick your days wisely. Lite surf and little wind for the beach. The waves are going to make it that much harder to control your line, it is imperative that you stay in contact with the fly. Feel it moving and pushing water, know in your mind what it's doing , these are the keys to success!
    Last edited by Rachel Marie; 04-02-2013 at 08:53 AM.

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    Nope, I get it. It's oft times difficult to make reccomendations for people with the limited amount of information that is provided in such a post. Based on everything you've said thus far, I think you made the right choice. Sometimes we have to read between the lines and try to figure out what's best. So many nuances of abilty. Two guys can ask the same question and get two different answers, again, based on those nuances. One fishes three times a week and the other fishes now and then, one can cast anything a mile, the other has a hard time putting out 50 feet of line. One has a Loomis 10wt GLX, the other an old fenwick glass rod. Makes it tuff.
    Even with your intermediate line, to get more depth, throw a heavily weighted fly. A Clouser, an Assassin or a Jiggy fly. That outfit will be great for working sliders around the jetties, somebody will come up and bite ya. An intermediate line sinks, just slowly. You can in a pinch, count it down, learn to read the current. Cast it way up current and let it sink for 10, 15 or more seconds. You'll be closer to the zone when you need to be.

    Goodluck, keep us informed of your adventures.
    John Yank

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Marie View Post
    Brother I got news for ya, I fished a intermediate line for the first 5-6years and caught every species on the list from jetties,beach,boat river,ect. didn't even know what a sink line was till I went up to the cape and now your dealing with 10-12ft tides and ripping water. Here's the bottom line , you can fish any fly u want with a inter. even poppers if u get on the line quick, it is the best suited line for saltwater fly fishing. The sink line has its moments, DEEP water and current... sorry if I came off like a *** but this is not rocket science. and its a pain to cast if you have no experience with a flyrod and controlling the line . Good luck get out there , my first Bass I swear on my mothers grave was on my first cast on a white deceiver. once you feel that take or a bass surfaces to crush you fly right as your taking it out the water , YOUR HOOKED! o yeah one more thing, pick your days wisely. Lite surf and little wind for the beach. The waves are going to make it that much harder to control your line, it is imperative that you stay in contact with the fly. Feel it moving and pushing water, know in your mind what it's doing , these are the keys to success!
    Same here, I didn't know from a sinking line when I started. Fished years with intermediate lines, always from jetties and the beach. Can't say I caught a bass on my first cast though, took a little longer for me.
    One of RM's statements is the most important thing you can learn. It is why you have guys that out catch others consistantly, same rod, same fly, same spot and same line.
    That is; "stay in constant contact with the fly" CONSTANT! feel it moving, visualize in your minds eye what it is doing, where it is. Do what you can to enhance it's action, it's life like appearence and teeease those fish into striking. That my friend, is the art of fly fishing.
    John Yank

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    Beginners luck! The next time I caught something it was the back of my shirt on the forward cast! I didn't get another fish on the fly for months, probably the best thing that could have happened , turned me into a fly fishing animal! That's all I wanted to do...Amen

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Marie View Post
    Brother I got news for ya, I fished a intermediate line for the first 5-6years and caught every species on the list from jetties,beach,boat river,ect. didn't even know what a sink line was till I went up to the cape and now your dealing with 10-12ft tides and ripping water. Here's the bottom line , you can fish any fly u want with a inter. even poppers if u get on the line quick, it is the best suited line for saltwater fly fishing. The sink line has its moments, DEEP water and current... sorry if I came off like a *** but this is not rocket science. and its a pain to cast if you have no experience with a flyrod and controlling the line . Good luck get out there , my first Bass I swear on my mothers grave was on my first cast on a white deceiver. once you feel that take or a bass surfaces to crush you fly right as your taking it out the water , YOUR HOOKED! o yeah one more thing, pick your days wisely. Lite surf and little wind for the beach. The waves are going to make it that much harder to control your line, it is imperative that you stay in contact with the fly. Feel it moving and pushing water, know in your mind what it's doing , these are the keys to success!
    Hey, no worries! Thanks for all the tips. Much of this isn't rocket science but it's amazing how not knowing a simple bit of information can make such a big difference in having a good day.

    I'll probably take my spinning gear and fly gear with me on all trips, even the late night suicide runs. I'll leave one in the car and switch based on the mood of both mother nature and I.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Marie View Post
    Beginners luck! The next time I caught something it was the back of my shirt on the forward cast! I didn't get another fish on the fly for months, probably the best thing that could have happened , turned me into a fly fishing animal! That's all I wanted to do...Amen
    I started fishing a few years ago because my daughter wanted to go after her g-pop took her. We didn't catch anything and it drove me nuts and made me obsessed. Before that I could care less about fishing.

    Then one day a guy is slaying trout with a fly rod and that gets me thinking. I found a full fly box one day while fishing for smallies and went and bought a $40 Pflueger combo and got started. Eventually, I had to stop bringing my spinning gear and force myself to only use the fly rod.

    I just started fishing the salt this fall and now I'm trying to learn two types of fishing at the same time.

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    Honestly if you want to become a better fly caster and fly fisherman in general leave the spinning gear at home don't even take it, this way it won't tempt you. Doing this will force you to use the fly gear. It will force you to learn to cast in all types of wind conditions. It will force you to look for areas out of the wind or with wind at your back. It will also force you learn to cast on the backhand, back facing the the way you want you cast to go for the most part.

    Now when I say back facing the way you want your cast to go don't ever turn your back on the ocean especially when fishing the surf with crashing waves.

    -------------------
    Catch and Release
    Bob


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    Quote Originally Posted by NoVisibleLeader View Post
    Now when I say back facing the way you want your cast to go don't ever turn your back on the ocean especially when fishing the surf with crashing waves.
    Haha, I'm a surfer too. You never turn your back to the ocean!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel Marie View Post
    Brother I got news for ya, I fished a intermediate line for the first 5-6years and caught every species on the list from jetties,beach,boat river,ect. didn't even know what a sink line was till I went up to the cape and now your dealing with 10-12ft tides and ripping water. Here's the bottom line , you can fish any fly u want with a inter. even poppers if u get on the line quick, it is the best suited line for saltwater fly fishing. The sink line has its moments, DEEP water and current... sorry if I came off like a *** but this is not rocket science. and its a pain to cast if you have no experience with a flyrod and controlling the line . Good luck get out there , my first Bass I swear on my mothers grave was on my first cast on a white deceiver. once you feel that take or a bass surfaces to crush you fly right as your taking it out the water , YOUR HOOKED! o yeah one more thing, pick your days wisely. Lite surf and little wind for the beach. The waves are going to make it that much harder to control your line, it is imperative that you stay in contact with the fly. Feel it moving and pushing water, know in your mind what it's doing , these are the keys to success!
    Hey, no worries! Thanks for all the tips. Much of this isn't rocket science but it's amazing how not knowing a simple bit of information can make such a big difference in having a good day.

    Here's a good tune that reminds you to not to turn your back on the ocean.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0R5D36ngew

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