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Its a wooden one it could be $3500.00 some people just want out of wooden boats and some marinias don't want them either. We banned wooden boats 30yrs. ago.
 

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One thing for sure,it has a 53 series Detroit in her. You would not have to worry about painting the bilge,it is probably oil soaked after all these years.Don't know if they had 53's in WW2. It may be a repower. Probably came with a Gray Marine 71 Detroit.
 

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those series are easy to maintain parts are reasonable and not to hard to acquire could still work on those after 20 some years
 

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and they didn't make a v6 71 v start with 8v71 and up
and 53 's 2 3 4 v6 v8 53' seen plenty of 3 4 and 6v for lifetime
 

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A wooden Hull would scare 99.9% of people.
 

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Scirc they made thousands of 6v71's in both right and left hand. The 6 cyl. Detroit was made in the 53-71 & 92 series. The 53's were mainly used in bus's and as industrial engines and some marine. The 71 & 92's were the most popular marine engines.
 

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Wooden hull doesn't scare me...they are work for sure, but as long as they are built right they last just fine...
 

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A wooden Hull would scare 99.9% of people.
You got that right. I had 4 wooden boats before I went to Fiberglass. I use to dread the Spring caulking the bottom and at times caulking and cotton on the seams.When they came out with Slick Seam,life got easier,but the first launch was a 2 day event as I had to stay there to make sure she swelled.Prior to launch,I either filled the bilge with water at 3 to 4 inches or if I could find them ,put wet burlap bags in the bilge and wet them constanly for 2 to 3 weeks prior to launch.

At launch time I would sit on the boat and if I had a trikle of water coming in a seam ,would dump sawdust next to it hoping that it would suck it in.

Hell would freeze over before I would ever take on another wooden boat. Someone could offer me a 40 footer with twin diesels for a dollar and I would not walk away,I would run.Nothing worse than spending the month of March on your back looking at every seam and fixing everyone that looked suspisious.On top of that,dry rot was always waiting for your at the edge of the decks ,cabins,trim,bottom of the windows,etc.

The only item I do miss is the smell of a wooden boat.It does have a "salty odor" to her,but I gladly gave up the nostalgia to save my sanity of keeping a wooden boat sea worthy.

Also,do not miss driving up to the boat and a block away,you think will she be floating or will she be low in the water with a leak.:eek::eek::eek::eek:.
 

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Hopefully at that price someone will snap it up and put it in a museum.
 

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You got that right. I had 4 wooden boats before I went to Fiberglass. I use to dread the Spring caulking the bottom and at times caulking and cotton on the seams.When they came out with Slick Seam,life got easier,but the first launch was a 2 day event as I had to stay there to make sure she swelled.Prior to launch,I either filled the bilge with water at 3 to 4 inches or if I could find them ,put wet burlap bags in the bilge and wet them constanly for 2 to 3 weeks prior to launch.

At launch time I would sit on the boat and if I had a trikle of water coming in a seam ,would dump sawdust next to it hoping that it would suck it in.

Hell would freeze over before I would ever take on another wooden boat. Someone could offer me a 40 footer with twin diesels for a dollar and I would not walk away,I would run.Nothing worse than spending the month of March on your back looking at every seam and fixing everyone that looked suspisious.On top of that,dry rot was always waiting for your at the edge of the decks ,cabins,trim,bottom of the windows,etc.

The only item I do miss is the smell of a wooden boat.It does have a "salty odor" to her,but I gladly gave up the nostalgia to save my sanity of keeping a wooden boat sea worthy.

Also,do not miss driving up to the boat and a block away,you think will she be floating or will she be low in the water with a leak.:eek::eek::eek::eek:.
I heard and lived every word you just typed with my old 50ft Headboat... Keel layed in 49 finished in 50 at Chesapeke Boat Works. Built from Southern yellow pine, 2.5" diagonal forward keel to the chine 6" planking with every 5th or 6th plank being mahogany to take the brutal swelling of the yellow pine.

First year I had her she leaked too much for me. Put her on the beach in Cape May. Until April 1 the seams were tight. By the 15th I could read newspaper on the ground from inside the boat. My Dad was gone and all of his friends that owned wood boats. So I went over to Tony's in CM and talked to old Tony. He came and looked at her. Says be careful how much cotton you caulk her with. Says you don't want her blowing planks when she tightens up. Said I should have talked to him in Feb to line up time on the railway. When she started to open she should be dropped in the water for quick run to the railway. Even asked about filling the seams with grease, drop her and make full bore run to the railway.. This was the early 80's, 23 bucks an hr per man and his two guys could caulk her right in 2 days.. 800-1000 bucks would sure have been better than me under her for 4 weeks guessing about how not to over caulk each seam.. I got her buttoned pretty good and she tightened up pretty well in the slings at Cape Island over night with the bilge pumps handling the water.

Well the caulk job lasted two years. A good job would have lasted 4-5 years. I owned the boat for 11yrs and got to know how to do it right so I got better just to keep me out from under the boat..

The next thing was paint.... I found out Seashore home paint worked better than marine paints when you were washing every days and painting every year.

Higgins built PT boats and Landing crafts for the war effort. The used good mahogany and oak frames in their boats. If that boat wasn't left sit on the beach too long at any time it's worth every bit of 3500 bucks..
 
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