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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
There is a great need to crush the imports. I will not buy the china made products. When you buy the imported products from china you are supporting a product made with slave labor. Your call. I will not buy from them. We must stand together. Subsidized products designed to destroy our economy. JUST SAY NO.
 

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We will rock the tackle world like we rocked the firearms world. McMillan Brothers. :wave:
 

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It wouldn't hurt if you could show people some viable options for American made products. I personally only fish avets and some penn reels, but what about rods? Hooks? Leader? My boat is american made but what about outboards? I make my own sinkers so they're American made, and I know my next rods will be "fish poisons". So they will be American made.
 

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Quality comes at price that most are not conditioned to pay for. Terms of value have become upset with the flood of Chinese goods in most markets. Quality is second to price to the masses. If your product isn't better or priced less why should anyone buy it, most don't care about service after sale because 99% of time there is no service at all, which most have Accepted as the norm. Sorry I have a very dim outlook. The Chinese are slaves to our need of consumption of goods and we are slaves to taxation and a welfare state that has grown out of this call to class equality. Which is really just a form of free communism that we have chosen.

Rant over
 

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It is probably impossible to eliminate consumption of ALL Chinese made goods, but we can ALL start somewhere. It is your own future that is at stake.

Do a little research and make your discretionary choices accordingly. That's a start.

I personally don't have as big a beef with Japanese products as I do Chinese. China's monetary value manipulation is criminal. Their human rights and fair wage policies are non-existent. Environmental concerns - are you kidding me? Japan was no angel with past trade policies, but at least their economy and business standards are much more similar to ours than China.

Leveling of the world's economic waters does not solely mean that other countries increase their wealth and prosperity to USA levels. It means that we will decline to meet them, probably somewhere well below the middle. Think about that and then decide for yourself the future that you and your children would prefer.
 

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What Crap is made in China???

Isn't most of the quality tackle made in Japan and America?? I fish Shimano and Avets!! I have no problem buying tackle manufactured in another country especially if its kick ***!! You guys are beating a dead horse!! If a superior product is available whether it be a car or fishing reel, why wouldn't you buy it!!! Toyota Camrys are assembled here in the USA!! So before ya start bashing good ole Japenese product's think about all the Americans they employ. As far as China is concerned..have no fear as they are going to self destruct from pollution and the highest rate of cancer in the entire world!!!
 

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Isn't most of the quality tackle made in Japan and America?? I fish Shimano and Avets!! I have no problem buying tackle manufactured in another country especially if its kick ***!! You guys are beating a dead horse!! If a superior product is available whether it be a car or fishing reel, why wouldn't you buy it!!! Toyota Camrys are assembled here in the USA!! So before ya start bashing good ole Japenese product's think about all the Americans they employ. As far as China is concerned..have no fear as they are going to self destruct from pollution and the highest rate of cancer in the entire world!!!
MT, This is not just about tackle or superior products. Let's be specific. This is a Chinese problem - not much of anything superior coming from that source.

If we keep buying their products they may take us all with them to the grave. Would you let your kids play with lead-painted toys from China?
 

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Cant agree less with u mr nest,next thing we will start doung is let forigen fishing fleets harvest our fish because they give a petter prepaired product at at cheaper price , its only a commodity right,see thats the problem we as a country are ok to sellout instead of suport our locals who suport us , and yes its a plus to buy a american made toyota over a mersades,but still not as good as a ford,also note that those toyotas dont pay the same wages and benifits as ford , this is a fight for americas survival more important then one sector,now please help suport OUR country
 

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We will rock the tackle world like we rocked the firearms world. McMillan Brothers. :wave:

Just make sure you know the difference between Taiwan, Japan and China before you rock the tackle world...thanks..:)

2/3 are major allies which support many American jobs and own a large amount of American companies and properties including the company I work for. 2/3 hate China more than you do.. Rock on brother...:thumbsup:
 

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I believe the thoughts should be buy all american if you can , then buy from companys that employ alot of americans , but never buy cheap poorly made products that are made elsewere,our politicions and corporations woyld sell our childern , we are incharge of our own destiny, now lets act like it
 

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3 Misconceptions That Need to Die
At a conference in Philadelphia earlier this month, a Wharton professor noted that one of the country's biggest economic problems is a tsunami of misinformation. You can't have a rational debate when facts are so easily supplanted by overreaching statements, broad generalizations, and misconceptions. And if you can't have a rational debate, how does anything important get done? As author William Feather once advised, "Beware of the person who can't be bothered by details." There seems to be no shortage of those people lately.

Here are three misconceptions that need to be put to rest.

Misconception 1)

Most of what Americans spend their money on is made in China.

Fact: Just 2.7% of personal consumption expenditures go to Chinese-made goods and services. 88.5% of U.S. consumer spending is on
American-made goods and services.

I used that statistic in an article last week, and the response from readers was overwhelming: Hogwash. People just didn't believe it.
The figure comes from a Federal Reserve report. You can read it here.
A common rebuttal I got was, "How can it only be 2.7% when almost everything in Wal-Mart (NYSE: WMT ) is made in China?" Because Wal-Mart's $260 billion in U.S. revenue isn't exactly reflective of America's $14.5 trillion economy. Wal-Mart might sell a broad range of knickknacks, many of which are made in China, but the vast majority of what Americans spend their money on is not knickknacks.
The Bureau of Labor Statistics closely tracks how an average American spends their money in an annual report called the Consumer Expenditure Survey. In 2010, the average American spent 34% of their income on housing, 13% on food, 11% on insurance and pensions, 7% on health care, and 2% on education. Those categories alone make up nearly 70% of total spending, and are comprised almost entirely of American-made goods and services (only 7% of food is imported, according to the USDA).
Even when looking at physical goods alone, Chinese imports still account for just a small fraction of U.S. spending. Just 6.4% of nondurable goods -- things like food, clothing and toys -- purchased in the U.S. are made in China; 76.2% are made in America. For durable goods -- things like cars and furniture -- 12% are made in China; 66.6% are made in America.
Another way to grasp the value of Chinese-made goods is to look at imports. The U.S. is on track to import $340 billion worth of goods from China this year, which is 2.3% of our $14.5 trillion economy. Is that a lot? Yes. Is it most of what we spend our money on? Not by a long shot.
Part of the misconception is likely driven by the notion that America's manufacturing base has been in steep decline. The truth, surprising to many, is that real manufacturing output today is near an all-time high. What's dropped precipitously in recent decades is manufacturing employment. Technology and automation has allowed American manufacturers to build more stuff with far fewer workers than in the past. One good example: In 1950, a U.S. Steel (NYSE: X ) plant in Gary, Ind., produced 6 million tons of steel with 30,000 workers. Today, it produces 7.5 million tons with 5,000 workers. Output has gone up; employment has dropped like a rock.

Misconception 2):
We owe most of our debt to China.

Fact: China owns 7.8% of U.S. government debt outstanding.

As of August, China owned $1.14 trillion of Treasuries. Government debt stood at $14.6 trillion that month. That's 7.8%.
Who owns the rest? The largest holder of U.S. debt is the federal government itself. Various government trust funds like the Social Security trust fund own about $4.4 trillion worth of Treasury securities. The Federal Reserve owns another $1.6 trillion. Both are unique owners: Interest paid on debt held by federal trust funds is used to cover a portion of federal spending, and the vast majority of interest earned by the Federal Reserve is remitted back to the U.S. Treasury.
The rest of our debt is owned by state and local governments ($700 billion), private domestic investors ($3.1 trillion), and other non-Chinese foreign investors ($3.5 trillion).
Does China own a lot of our debt? Yes, but it's a qualified yes. Of all Treasury debt held by foreigners, China is indeed the largest owner ($1.14 trillion), followed by Japan ($937 billion) and the U.K. ($397 billion).
Right there, you can see that Japan and the U.K. combined own more U.S. debt than China. Now, how many times have you heard someone say that we borrow an inordinate amount of money from Japan and the U.K.? I never have. But how often do you hear some version of the "China is our banker" line? Too often, I'd say.

Misconception 3):

We get most of our oil from the Middle East.

Fact: Just 9.2% of oil consumed in the U.S. comes from the Middle East.

According the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the U.S. consumes 19.2 million barrels of petroleum products per day. Of that amount, a net 49% is produced domestically. The rest is imported.
Where is it imported from? Only a small fraction comes from the Middle East, and that fraction has been declining in recent years. So far this year, imports from the Persian Gulf region -- which includes Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates -- have made up 9.2% of total petroleum supplied to the U.S. In 2001, that number was 14.1%.
The U.S. imports more than twice as much petroleum from Canada and Mexico than it does from the Middle East. Add in the share produced domestically, and the majority of petroleum consumed in the U.S. comes from North America.
This isn't to belittle our energy situation. The nation still relies on imports for about half of its oil. That's bad. But should the Middle East get the attention it does when we talk about oil reliance? In terms of security and geopolitical stability, perhaps. In terms of volume, probably not.

A roomful of skeptics

"People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe," said Andy Rooney. Do these numbers fit with what you already believed? No hard feelings if they don't.

 

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OK, more smoke and mirrors from none other than the federal reserve. I suppose we have no inflation either and unemployment is only 8.5%? Lots of good the federal reserve has been doing us lately:rolleyes:.

So, since it has now been explained to us dummies so succinctly in LARGE BOLD TYPE so that we can ALL understand, let's all just go back to our little lives of fantasy and forget all about reality. I am certain that only the elite leaders, journalists and Wharton professors of our world are capable of rational, detail-oriented thought, anyway, so who are we commoners to even attempt a rebuttal? Elitism at its best - and nothing less. Please take that article and shove it where the sun don't shine. It is not even worthy as toilet paper.

There is nothing generalized about company dormitories and there is no misconception regarding how chinese labor is paid, nor the chinese' disregard for human rights and environment. Unfortunately, those are a few DETAILS your author chose to overlook.
 

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The phrase Buy American typically comes from union members who want us to disregard the price of goods and "be loyal" to your fellow Americans, at your expense. The real yardstick has to be "what makes sense for me? Competition is what makes America strong. It keeps prices low, wages in check, and offers consumers a range of products, prices and quality. If you want to buy a cheap rod and reel, do it. It may provide you with the utility you desire. Do your research. Open borders for foreign goods serves us well. Apple produces it products in China. Do you think they're poorly made?
 
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