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Hey Mikej, Thank you for the information, i really hope that someone can figure out what is going on with these fish and there illness, I really enjoy grilling fresh fish not ever thinking about getting sick or a rash from them. THANKS AGAIN WITH THE INFO...BUDDY
 

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I've been following this story for past couple of years. There is evidence that the overwhelming majority of effective fish are in and remain in Cheasapeake Bay area .
some scientist have said that some infected fish once out of cheasapeake area begin to heal as a result of moving into cleaner water.Others have said the infected fish rarely move in a migration as they are too weak
The fact remains the Cheasapeake is a dying watershed as a result of all the S$#$ being dump into it. It is not only stripers dying but crabs, shellfish, croakers , and other fish all dying off.
In addition eels grass is rapidily leaving the bay
We can only hope our NJ waters remain clean and we can continue to develop a strong YOY spawn in our waters
However , I suspect in the end we will see an increase in diseased fish especially if we see higher than normal water temperatures
 

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Yeah, this seems to be a recurring topic of discussion... There was a long thread last year or so on here where a guy probably had fish handlers disease.

Most of us have probably caught fish with visible sores on the fish's skin, one or multiple sores. Most would probably throw back these fish.

But... if your read that article.. what concerned me was that sores on a fish's skin is one of the LATER manifestations of the disease. The bacteria goes to the organs first, e.g., the spleen.

I know I've gutted fish that appeared healthy on the outside but to my eye, the organs didn't "look" right. I've seen a few fish with nodules on the organs, they look like tapioca pearls studding the organs. This is probably disease, yet I kept the fish 'cause it looked OK on the oustide.

I ate it too


Mycobacterium marinarum is probably similar to mycobacterium tuberculosis which causes TB in humans. TB is on the rise worldwide, too. Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy. I know there's a few biologists on here that can comment on this.

That article said almost 20% of fish by the age of 2 years are infected, you can easily check how old a 28" fish is on your charts...

Anyways.. who knows what all this means right now. I would at least take some precautions.

A simple wash your hands with soap and water after handling striped bass, wear gloves if possible.
Do you need to throw back fish with sores? Up to you.
How about the fish you keep? Wash & cook the fish well...

Only long term studies will tell what the significance of this infeciton is...

[ 03-16-2006, 07:13 PM: Message edited by: snapper4 ]
 

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Three words Menhaden reduction industry!!

These fish that exhibit symptoms are thin!! it is malnourishment that is putting the stock in jeporady. We have rebuilt the stocks but cut back on forage species a sure recipe for disaster
 

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yeah its the rduction fleets fault GET REAL buddy,i guess all of the runoff in the chesapeake watershed has nothing to do with it ot the overpopulation of the species,they need to cut it back or other specis #s are gonna start dropping
 

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I fish Western Long Island Sound, last year a couple of local guys caught a few bass with pink sores and fins deterioated, needless to say they went back into the water.
 

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I agree with you about the pollution and think that has a major impact on all life in the bay. But if you rebuild the stocks of the predators and then eliminate the food don't you think that has an impact on the stock? These boats take millions of pounds of menhaden every season. Again you even said it "the overpopulation of the species" I don't think any fish would live if the water was that bad. Combine a high stock level poor water conditions (as you stated) and a low food supply and seems to me the inevitable is now happening.
 

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the headline is very misleading. The body of the article mentions by age two 19% of fish have the disease. By age 3 or 4 these fish leave the bay and become part of the coastal stock. Almost all our resident fish are young fish. I catch a lot and I mean a lot of young fish all summer long and 75 percent is a totally fabricated number. We are not over here pulling up diseased fish every 3 out of 4 we catch! Yes the beloved Chessie has a multitude of problems that include both fisheries issues and pollution issues, I would never downplay that fact, but to say 75% of our rockfish are diseased is a gross overstatement.
 

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If you catch any of these deformed fish, they should NOT go back into the water. Take 'em out of the bio-mass and dispose of them in a trash can, where they can't infect anything else.
 

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Originally posted by waterman482:
yeah its the rduction fleets fault GET REAL buddy,i guess all of the runoff in the chesapeake watershed has nothing to do with it ot the overpopulation of the species,they need to cut it back or other specis #s are gonna start dropping
waterman, I agree the runoff is major contributor - and must be dealt with. So does restoring the bunker. To say its not the reduction fleets fault is correct - its partly there fault. They are one part of what has led to the issue of a dying watershed.

If the bunker where around in large numbers the bass probably wouldn't eat as much of the other species, while flitering the water as well. Omega needs to be turned into a marina
 

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Originally posted by capt. ed:
the headline is very misleading. I would never downplay that fact, but to say 75% of our rockfish are diseased is a gross overstatement.
I couldn't agree more.People love to sensationalize. You have seen through their statistics. There are lies, damn lies, and STATISTICS!! And than you get a person trying to cause alarm, talking to a press writer, and voila...sh!t on a shingle

"In the bay, "by age 1, 11 percent are infected. By age 2, it's 19 percent," said DNR researcher Mark Matsche. But he cannot go beyond that -- by the third year, some fish have left the bay for open water." So here in the same article one of Va Inst of Marine Science researcher estimates it's 11% of 1 yr olds, and 19% of 2 yr olds. Than they leave the bay, and WHO KNOWS?
 

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OVERPOPULATION,people have beeb saying this for a long time,including myself,the smart thing to do would be stop commercial fishing for weakfish and let the neters that fish for weakies thin out the bass population,but the sports do not want that so when all the bass are sick they will have noboby to blame but themselves,it is the same as a aquarium if you concentrate fish to dense and one gets ill they all get ill,mark my words,then go kill all the bass you can including and especially the large breeders,that is my plan
 

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Jesus H Christ! Is this sensanionalism or fact.
can't eat chicken....bird flu
can't eat beef.... mad cow
can't eat most fish.... mercury
now my beloved bass glow in the dark!!
gimme a break
 

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so far the coastal stock is not apparently suffering from the same affliction. Those affected are either dying off or not migrating out of the C-bay to join the coasties. We are literally overrun with smallies over here during the summer months, each year our YOY surveys are stellar, and by all accounts the coastal stock numbers are strong (and healthy). Yup - there is a sickness involving our smaller resident fish, yup we got major runoff issues, low dissolved oxygen, pollutants, etc,..but we are still supplying the striper coast with many recruits to the stock each and every year. It is NOT all gloom and doom. IMHO
 

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Originally posted by dnik:
Jesus H Christ! Is this sensanionalism or fact.
can't eat chicken....bird flu
can't eat beef.... mad cow
can't eat most fish.... mercury
now my beloved bass glow in the dark!!
gimme a break
It most absolutely IS sensationalism, although we all agree it's alarming even at any level!

This is part of the fact that our health news is coming to us in 20 secondsound bytes over the news . "Remember facts are unimportant for those looking to create anxiety amongst the uninformed" They are TRYING to get a rise out of you. Whether it's legit or not doesn't matter to them, they want to shock you.

Than add the Pew foundation giving 200million dollars a year to 527 plans, NPR,schools, researchers, doing all their nefarious things to make fish and fishing to look bad, and you might be getting an idea about what is happening.

For this thread let's stick to striper mycrobacterium.
 

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Stiper overpopulation Bull. Pollution and also in part the reduction fleet is the problem. I read an article in Discover Magazine about ten years ago ( "The Most Important Fish In The Sea ") which linked Mycobacterium marinarum to the loss of the bunker by the reduction fleet way back then and still the Chesapeke Bay is overexploted. To increase the taking of the "overpopulated stripers" by commercial interest is probably the aim of the authors of this latest missinformation.
 
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