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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to chunking for stripers and would appreciate a few tips on backbay chunking. Is it better to anchor up on some structure, or along a dropoff in the fall? Are areas closer to inlets generally better than say a river that empties into a backbay? Also, how many pounds of bunker should I bring? How often should I be chunking, etc?
 

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WhiteBucket--

Although I don't chunk in the Back bays as much I would like I have done it several times with great success. This has been both in the Fall and Spring. Personally I like holes, Sod Banks, Creek opening more then structure and the like. I tend to be someone close to the inlet on many occasions but don't think it is a must. I would say a few spots have us about 1-2NM to an inlet. But again that might just be a coicedence. Now as far as how many pounds of bunker I would say use clam but that is just what I have had better luck with. I am sure bunker would also work but I would definitely use small small peices because of the size of the fish you would catch. The biggest I caught in the back was 39" and that was behind Cape May/Wildwood Crest area. That was 2 years ago and with clam. I was aboard the Partnership with Tommy's 2 oldest. But again I wouldn't totally dismiss bunker I would just lean more to the clam. Now if you decide to do both I would definitely keep them in seperate coolers and not chunk with both at the same time. I picked this up from Tommy who learned from the master, Capt Fred @ No Bones Bait and tackle. I am sure Fred will add some but this is the way I do it and like I said I have had good success. Hope this helps.
 

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Check out CHUNKING posts from No Bones Bait & Tackle in Wildwood. He has all the knowledge. Email him !
If you really want to get some info., get some Wawa coffee and pay him a visit on Rio Grand Ave Wildwood. He has film, pictures and everything you could think of to show you how to chunk the back !!
 

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Originally posted by HOT GREASE:
Check out CHUNKING posts from No Bones Bait & Tackle in Wildwood. He has all the knowledge. Email him !
If you really want to get some info., get some Wawa coffee and pay him a visit on Rio Grand Ave Wildwood. He has film, pictures and everything you could think of to show you how to chunk the back !!
I agree CHUNKING could chunk up stripers anywhere and knows probably more about it than anyone on this board IMO.
 

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WhiteBucket,

Here are some tips on BackBay Clam Chunking/Fishing.
From Fred aka Chunking...
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chunking
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Member # 3398

posted November 15, 2004 05:43 AM
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It is gaining in popularity and it works if done right. Sold a bag to one guy who boated his first striper. He has been out for five trips and has one striper. He is still using that same bag of bellies.

I have been chunking clams for many years and there is one constant rule. Every day is different. One day the fish may already be there and the next they may not. Throw some bellies and bang, fish on. Next day throw for an hour before a hit.

If there is one mistake being made out there it's not using enough chum. Go out with the intent on using every bit of chum. Stretching a bag for multiple trips will usually mean multiple slow days. You can't throw to much. You won't over feed the stripers. You will just create a feeding frenzy with more fish in your slick.

Keep mixing water with the clams. Make and throw as much juice as possible. You want that scent flooding their senses. You want to be the clam boat. Throw juice and chunks. The stripers will eat their way to your hook.


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chunking
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posted April 08, 2005 03:44 AM
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Have to look at the entire clam. There is the loose meat like the muscle, strap and siphon. Nice to eat chopped up in chowders but not much flavor. Then you have the big tongue or foot of the clam. Great sliced, breaded and fried but again little flavor.

When they commercially bread the clam slices for fried clam strips they have to jack up the flavor. When they can chopped clams they have to jack up the flavor. Both are done with clam juice. The meat of a surf clam just doesn't have much flavor. That is what makes them so valuable. Most people like a slight flavor of clam in their chowders. They don't want to be overpowered by it. Restaurants can doctor the flavor by the amount of juice they add to the chowder. If they just kept adding meat they would come up with a very expensive bland tasting chowder.

The clam belly is what you don't want to see in your chowder. It is packed with the digestive organs that are green and brownish in color. Not what you want in a spoonfull of chowder. It is also the most overpowering area of the clam for both juice and aroma. It may not be what we want to eat or taste but it's what the fish want.

Take a bunker out for crab bait and whats the first part to be attacked by the crabs and fish? The stomach area. Throw a fish carcuss over the cleaning board and watch the minnows attack. It's the stomach area. It's where the flavor or scent comes from. With clams it's the same. The fish want the softest juiciest part of the clam first.

When I fish I chunk with the bellies and bait up with bellies. They always work for me.


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chunking
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posted October 26, 2004 03:24 AM
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As more stripers show up the back bay food factory attracts more attention.

Think about it. Every inlet is a hot spot for striper fishing. With just a few swipes of their big tail and they are in our back bays. Shiners, crabs, flounder, mullet, bunker and anything else they want to eat is there for the taking.

So where do we fish for them?

When chumming or chunking I believe it's easier to say where not to fish for them. Without a doubt the big problem with back bay striper fishing is weeds. I catch more stripers when I locate an area that has minimal weed problems. I stay away from bridges. Bridges are usually built at the most narrow section of water. The current is always stronger in these narrow areas. Strong currents just suck in the weeds and keeps them suspended causing more problems than the bridge structure is worth.

Main channels do the same plus channels and bridges mean boat traffic. When you are anchored boat wakes are just as bothersome as the weeds. Weeds and wakes can make for some irritating trips.

Channels don't always mean the deepest water around. I see many sections of the intercoastal channel that are only about twelve feet deep but a few hundred feet away the water is well over twenty feet deep.

The intercoastal is a cotinueous channel that runs through the back bays. Deep cuts and drop offs may only run a short distance before shallowing out. Shallowing out isn't a good thing when you are a big boat traveling from point A to point B but it's a good thing when striper fishing.

Most of our back bays are lined with sod banks. Usually one side will be deeper than the other. I look for the sharp dropp offs that can be just a few feet off these banks. Check the sod out sometime and you can find thirty feet of water just a few feet off the bank. That sod represents structure. Crabs and countless fish hug the sod for protection and stripers hang ther for an easy meal.

A big plus for the sod banks is that the current is almost always weaker than the main channel so the weed factor is at a minimal. To reduce the weed factor even more fish the slower tides. I prefer the last hour and first hour of the tides. When the water slows down suspended weeds settle down for cleaner fihing.

Check out any area where there is a sharp turn in the waterway. Stripers love to set up just at the turn in ambush. When schools of baitfish make a sharp turn there is usually a wiplash effect that spreads them out offering more targets for the stripers.

Don't let skinny water scare you. If your boat can fit then so can a striper. A friend of mine who owns a forty footer laughed at me when I anchored up in a creek about sixty feet wide in my 21 footer. He stopped laughing when I netted his 42 incher. He said that he has only fished big boats in big waters and he catches his largest strper in a puddle.

Stripers will be active in the back bays until the water drops to about 43 degrees. When the wind is blowing or you are by yourself give the back bays a shot. Beats sitting at home and you can catch some big fish.


[ 10-06-2005, 11:05 AM: Message edited by: NIGHTSTRIKES ]
 

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Definitely give Fred a call over at the no-bones he's always willing to share some info on the back waters .and bellies are the way to go in the back .fresh or frozen if your on the fish they will catch....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the replies and info. I'm over in central delaware and there are really no places to get surf clams here. I figured I'd give the bunker a try because I can get them fresh from the netter 16$ for a 45 pound box.
 

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I'm blushing :D

If bunker is all you can get then go for it. Remember. Stripers are swimming seagulls.

If I were fishing the back bays with bunker I would try to flood the area with the bunker scent. Not bunker oils that float but ground up bunker. Get any scent moving in the current and you will get a stripers attention. You will also pull in a lot of shiners and other baitfish that the stripers will suck up. Give an area a good hour to let the scent work. You can draw in fish from miles away this way.

As far as location look for drop offs along sod banks. Edges of channels and mouths of creeks. When I chunk the back I love the last two hours of the incoming tide. Enough current to spread the scent but it will slow down and keep the weed problem to a minimum. About every two minutes get some chum in the water. Stripers have a short attention span and if it isn't in their nose constantly they may turn and look elsewhere.

If you can grind up some bunker or purchase it frozen then just mix in some chunks of fresh and let the frenzy begin.

Good Luck.
 
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