BASS BARN banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
278 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys...Great to see everyone...I just wanted to throww this topic around and get some feedback on Barometric pressure and the effect it haves on fish...I remember when i use to fish for largemouth bass a guy told me that the pressure effects the feeding pattern of fish...We'll with that being said what is it that gives them lockjaw and what gets them going as far as relation to the pressure...And what in your opinions through observation have you guys found as far as stripers and feeding while there is a rise in pressure or drop ...And what about steady...Thanks again and as always greatly appreciated...Pazman ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,008 Posts
Paz,

In my opinion, stripers react in a similar fashion to largemouth bass to changes in the barometric pressure.

I have found that as a front comes through and the barometer falls, stripers go on the feed the day prior to the front hitting.

I also notice that they change depth in accordance with these changes. On a falling barometer they can be caught on topwater lures as well as on the bottom. During a rising pressure situation they seem to seek out deeper water until the system stabilizes.

Good topic, I had this conversation with Skip & Jeremy earlier in the year.

These are just general rules but I have found them to be somewhat consistent over the years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Barometeric pressure effects fish with larger bladders,{sea trout and drums}far more than stripers.A large and fast rise can and usally does shut weakies off altogether.You may have to fish deeper areas,but stripers can still be caught.In fact I have seen this weather turn stripers on, as it causes bait to move from real shallow flats.Ever notice how trout seem so active ahead of a front?I think this is to make up for the feeding down time after front passes and a rising barmo happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,578 Posts
I think barometric pressure definitely affects fishing, but not because of the pressure changes. Barometric pressure changes produce changes in wind direction and speed and it is these changes that effect the fishing. Some folks have argued that fish sense the pressure change through their air bladder. The change in pressure from the surface to 30 feet creates a doubling in the pressure (2 Atmospheres). The change in barometric pressure associated with storms, would represent the fish swimming up or down a few inches in the water column. Both fish with swim bladders and those without (most shark species) are affected by the changes associated with barometric pressure shifts. An example is that prior to a front coming through in the fall, the wind will generally switch SE. SE is a very favorable wind because it tends to be a mild wind, and keeps the inshore waters clean and calm. Both of these conditions cause bait to move inshore which brings the stripers with them. The attendant water clarity also makes good hunting for visual ambush predators like stripers. This is one example of how wind shifts associated with barometric changes can make for a good day fishing. Many more examples of good and bad affects of barometric swings exist, but as I mentioned, I believe it is the wind changes that produce most of the effects and applies to both fresh and salt water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Low pressure is also associated with bad weather, ie. cloud cover, while high pressure is associated with nice weather, ie. bright Carolina blue skys. While I do think changing pressure triggers a bite in most species, I also think that the cloud cover makes them feel safe and travel into shallower water (where surf anglers take full advantage). Also, most predator species have large eyes which are greatly affected by the bright sun.

Having said this, I have been skunked in November under cloudy skies with a light NE breeze and crystal clear water with a low pressure moving up the coast. I have also caught bass after trout in 2 feet of water in the middle of the afternoon in June under sunny skies.

The only thing that's for sure in fishing is nothing is for sure.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top