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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, so there still seems to a body of fish north and moving south while there has been an influx of bass down south already. Is the general consensus that these are all Hudson fish which are still around or a mix of Hudson/Delaware/Chessie fish??

Fishing SJ in the spring the obvious push of fish in the surf is the Delware fish dumping out post spawn and hungry. You would hope Chessie fish mixing in at some point to eat in the surf, which really only makes sense when we have the bunker in tight which has been the case. Hudson fish, get outta here, we don't have a shot at them down here until the southern migration in the fall - if we even get a shot at them then in the surf??

This would lead one to believe that the spring bites should be best the more north you travel and the fall/winter bites best to the south. This really seems to hold true as the NNJ bunker bite may be a combination of all three stocks congolomerating on the same bait, and vice versa offshore down south in the winter. This assuming that Hudson fish would turn south after their spawn because the bunker is off NNJ, would a bass dare??!!

So, how are these stocks moving south? Do they all meet up at Montauk like it is some sort of rest stop on the turnpike?? There inevitably has to be some mixing of the stocks if the bait keeps them somewhere for a while, but I like to think that there are really three waves of fish each fall, and common sense would lead you to believe you see a Chessie push, a Delware push and finally a Hudson push.

All I know is that I drool when I think about the late spring/summer bite up north. Three massive stocks of fish setting up and hungry with no where to go, just chillin and eating for two-three months. I imagine you could really dial in a surf bite up there and stay on it longer than anywhere else.

Just posting random thoughts.....

RyanF
 

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There must be mixing of these fish as you suggested. I can't believe that members of a same species would migrate to and from the same regions with the same fish for their whole lives without spending time with other bass in the Hudson, Delaware, Jersey backwaters, the Sound Chesapeake, Cape Cod etc.

I think that they follow bait wherever it is plentiful until all water gets pretty cold and then they find some other bass and they shack up in numbers all along the northeast-mid atlantic. I would love to be able to follow a bass through 10-15 years of life to see just how it moved along the coast. I wonder if a 20 yr old fish hasn't spent considerable time in most major waterbodies along the east coast from NC up to Maine. I think it has. I hope Rutgers can grow the scope of their tracking program to get a true picture of the secret lives of striped bass.
 

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We are out there everyday and still can't figure out who goes where and when etc. Do they lay up for the winter in Albany or off NC? We go south one day and north the next, we follow a blitz 8 miles north when they should be heading 8 miles south. Do they spawn twice a year? From what we have seen most of the females are always full or roe, even the little 30 inchers. Just our thoughts.
 

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I think it is a mixture of all of the above well stated ideas. This fall showed an insane bite off Sandy Hook well after they were catching heavily out of Oregon Inlet. At the same time the Cape May Rips guys were tearing them up too. Clearly they are spread way out over their range and in no hurry to follow the "rules" that we want them to follow. Also the tag returns which have been reported here and other places show a clear mixing of the stocks. This is all great for species preservation IMHO.

Despite all that great bassing, the bite just sucked for SJ within the 3 mile zone. Think we can chip in to dredge a 60 foot trench about 1 mile off AC? We can name it after Bass Barn or Reddington Hole or something like that. It might be cheaper in the long run than running to Barnegat every trip.
 

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Here is what i believe.
The 3 main spawning areas. Hudson, delaware, and chessy.
Those 3 move about the same time, but with different destinations. Chessy fish dont go as far north as hudson fish.
Hudson fish dont go further south than delaware.
I think they all winter close to the spawning areas.
Like this map might indicate. While the arrows are all off shore, i believe that where u see those arrows end is a good indication where the bass are when a line is drawn inland.
 

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We are out there everyday and still can't figure out who goes where and when etc. Do they lay up for the winter in Albany or off NC? We go south one day and north the next, we follow a blitz 8 miles north when they should be heading 8 miles south. Do they spawn twice a year? From what we have seen most of the females are always full or roe, even the little 30 inchers. Just our thoughts.
Not ripe row, but they start to develop row in fall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I was thinkin about that chart last night, glad you dug it up.

Can't see it too well on my phone, but it doesn't show anything off VA, unless you are speculating that they are all/a majority Chessie fish...

Wouldn't this make the Chessie fish a "super" stock because they are obviously eating better all winter?

RyanF
 

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I was thinkin about that chart last night, glad you dug it up.

Can't see it too well on my phone, but it doesn't show anything off VA, unless you are speculating that they are all/a majority Chessie fish...

Wouldn't this make the Chessie fish a "super" stock because they are obviously eating better all winter?

RyanF
Chessie is the Larger stock, by far. And that chart is a general area, not exact. I would venture to say those migrations can vary by alot of miles on a year to year basis.
I think i read that the chessie stock makes up 80% of the striper population. I think thats what the # was.:huh:
 

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Chessie is the Larger stock, by far. And that chart is a general area, not exact. I would venture to say those migrations can vary by alot of miles on a year to year basis.
I think i read that the chessie stock makes up 80% of the striper population. I think thats what the # was.:huh:
i've read the same - 80-85% of the stock kind of hard to believe
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I have read that the Chessie is the majority, the backbone of the striped bass stock as whole if you will, but 80-85% seems INSANE. I would think that even 50%-25%-25% would be pretty insane.

I don't know why, but I still have a hard time believing that a majority of the Delaware stock over winters in the bay or offshore of the bay mouth. There is just no way those fish sit dormant, or feed infrequently, while the Chessie fish are on all out assault all winter down south. That is just too much of a disadvantage for the spawn and northern push in the spring, no?????

Those three yellow "spring" lines still seem to be where it's at, yummy......

RyanF
 
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