BASS BARN banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
820 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I can't sleep ans I'm sitting here playing with my cats with a 2 ft wand and long peice of fabrick (5 ft) "casting" it to my anxious cats when I realize the difference between how I used to cast and how I cast years later.
To get the line to load correctly, you have to pay attention to your back cast. When you pull the rod back to "two o'clock", pay attention to your line instead of your rod. A good cast will bring your fly line to a full length in your back cast and whip your fly forward in a smooth motion. You almost have to force yourself to pause before you start pulling your rod forward again. This will make your fly land smoother and farther than if you jerk the line forward before it loads. For those beginners out there, watch your line "load" before you start your forward cast.
I started fly fishing doing the 2-10 o'clock method without paying atention to what the line was doing. After I started paying attention and feeling the line load, I got a feel for it and didn't have to look back. It makes a huge difference.
Also, I have become a much better fly caster since I started "blind casting" (I think that is what it is called). I was fishing the Roanoke River Rapids on a small aluminum boat with my buddy and a guide years ago and had to learn how to cast my fly to the bank which was on the back side of my cast. Basically, if I would have cast like I normally would have, I would have been casting over the middle of the boat, which I don't think the other guys would have appreciated (hook in the head is never good). You do this by standing away from where you want to put the fly, casting like you normally would, then lowering the tip in your back cast and letting the line go like you would in your regular cast. This is a very important skill to learn, especially if the wind is pushing against you.
I have learned to face the beach, cast toward the sand and lay my fly in the surf in my back cast just as far as I would if I was casting toward the water.
Try these tips and I promise you will be able to cast longer and in conditions you would not normally be able to fish.
Good luck and tight lines!
Brent
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
789 Posts
Very good advice. I am still working on that "blind casting" thing. I can make a decent cast, but I don't get a whole lot of distance. Lots of beginners want to make the cast in one continuous motion. Once they learn to pause on the back cast, their casting improves dramatically. Your post begins with the real secret to casting a fly rod well.... practice, practice, practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,132 Posts
Yes, the pause ("one, two") eliminates the whip crack and makes for a much more accurate cast. Rushing the forward cast is the most common mistake for new flycasters.

Everyone should practice casting with either hand so position or wind direction won't limit your opportunities.

I saw Steve Rajeff, holder of several distance records, give many exhibitions when he worked for Loomis. What I noticed most about his double-haul technique is the major hip, torso twist, like a golfer or baseball player.

For the follow-through, he holds it, like a bowler watching a ball roll down the alley. When he's done, his top half is spun almost 180 degrees from his legs, rod arm fully extended to front, pointing at target, other arm fully extended to rear.

You guys are right. There is no substitue for practice. I enjoy going out in the yard to see what's biting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,132 Posts
Who hasn't had their fly rod come apart, the tip sailing into the water, when they were casting? :D This probably happens more with fly rods, simply because the casting motion is made so many times.

The fix is easy. When piecing the rod together, slide the top section down with the guides at 90 degrees to the guides on the lower section. When the top section bottoms out, turn it so the guides are now all in-line with the lower section. You will feel it tighten up in the ferrule.

To disassemble, turn the section 90 degrees before pulling apart. This works with any multiple peice rod, fly, spinning, surf...

It will never come loose while casting and it will never be hard to take apart. Keep the ferrule areas clean. Dirt, sand can scratch the material and weaken it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
771 Posts
I got on for you. You loosen the drag to make it east to strip line out for your cast,then forget to retighten it.Big bass hits and you"ve got the pretiest birds nest and broken leader.Of course this never happened to me, Ha, Ha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,632 Posts
Let's see, beginner's mistakes?

1. trying a new knot and not testing it before hooking into a good fish.

2. trying the same not while having forgotten the fly pouch back at the vehicle, thereby losing the ONLY fly you have on you...seems not possible right? wrong :D

3. wading out onto the bar, in rolling surf, while using a solid stripping basket, which gets filled up with every wave, while you're trying to cast to the far side of the bar where the fish are feeding (note to self, have a basket with holes available for this situation)

4. using a regular cast with a stiff wind coming from your casting shoulder's direction. (can you say "WHACK UPSIDE THE HEAD"?)

5. trying to flyfish in surging surf without a stripping basket... go ahead, YOU do it for a while :D

6. not having wire leader when MONSTER BLUES come in at your feet... PING! PING! PING! go the flies until you can actually hook one in the corner of the mouth

7. trying to flyfish for albies using a wire leader.

hmmmm, there's probably more, but I think that's enough for now. been flyfishing in the salt since fall '02 and it's been a blast learning.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,198 Posts
Rob Glad none of that has happened to me. :D :D You forgot casting from a jetty with out a basket & pounding surf. Can get expensive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,632 Posts
yeah Ron, done that too...sorry for leaving it off the list... didn't want to put everything in one post *LOL*.

also, going onto a jetty in street shoes (no corkers).... can you say OUCH?

how about fishing with no fly for a while (it having broken off when "snapping" on a bad cast) and wondering why no hits (being low light and all)?

ah yes, beginner mistakes :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,853 Posts
Biggest mistake was not getting into it earlier.

Only saltwater fly fished. First time lake fishing kept forgetting that there were always trees behind me. Did loose a couple of flies to the tree bass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
820 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How about not letting the fly sink to the right depth before you start stripping the line. Fish are not always close to the top of the water column, and require you to let the fly sink before you start your retrieve. Depending on the fly, fly line and shooting head you are using, you might want to let the fly sink for a certain amount of time before you get it into the "strike zone". Take the time to understand the sinking rate of the line you are using and try different depths if you can't find the fish.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top