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I bleed every fish we catch, unless were in a tournament. If you can't taste the difference, then it makes more sense to bleed them. Cleaning a bled fish at the dock makes a lot less of a mess and it sure looks a lot better when they are in a baggie...which is important to me when it is for a charter. Ive also noticed lets liquid in the baggie or shrink wrap before you freeze them...another reason to bleed your fish. After you cook the fish the bled fish looks better too, in my opinion...it looks more white. Bluefish are a no brainer.
 

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I'd be willing to bet than in a side by side taste test, few would be able to tell the difference between a bled and an unbled striper.
Agree 100%. Most people can't tell the difference between a fish that's fresh, and one that's been frozen, fried, and dipped in cocktail sauce. But where it does make the biggest difference in taste is when you cook the fish with as little seasoning as possible.

A little bit of oil, salt, pepper and a light baking, so that it actually tastes like fish (instead of tartar, cocktail, or lemons), and it's easier to tell. But even then, it's not make or break.


Taste test, I agree. People can't tell. But as for cleaning and storing. It's much nicer without all the blood, and I wouldn't like to package and store bloody fish. I'd be curious to have the taste test after the fish has been packaged and stored for a few weeks or months.
Yep, even if it's only for the cosmetics, give me a freezer full of nice, white, vac packs instead of a bloody mess any day.
 

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What does a bled white meat fish taste like compared to an unbled one?:confused::please:

If you are really concerned with having the best possible meat, you shouldn't be cuttin the fish for 2-3 days. Bleed it or not it's up to you but then gut it and pack it with ice and refrig. for 2 or 3 days before filleting. "Fresh" caught, cut and cooked ASAP hours later, isn't the best at all. It the fish rests and goes through it's enzymatic process it's markedly better..:thumbsup:
 

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I'd be willing to bet than in a side by side taste test, few would be able to tell the difference between a bled and an unbled striper.
Depends if your going to freeze it or not. When you eat it fresh there isn't much difference. However I have found it makes all the difference in the world if your going to freeze it and eat it later, that goes for just about all fish.

Also, there is another upside to bleeding other than taste, its makes it way easier to clean it.
 

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What does a bled white meat fish taste like compared to an unbled one?:confused::please:

If you are really concerned with having the best possible meat, you shouldn't be cuttin the fish for 2-3 days. Bleed it or not it's up to you but then gut it and pack it with ice and refrig. for 2 or 3 days before filleting. "Fresh" caught, cut and cooked ASAP hours later, isn't the best at all. It the fish rests and goes through it's enzymatic process it's markedly better..:thumbsup:
Is the same true if it's bled (boat), iced (boat), filleted (home), and then put in the fridge for a few days?

(seriously asking)
 

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Is the same true if it's bled (boat), iced (boat), filleted (home), and then put in the fridge for a few days?

(seriously asking)

Sure you can do that
and it's better than cooked right away but it is better to 'age' it whole. All proteins (meat) are better 'aged' especially mammals :p
 

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Serious question: where are you guys cleaning fish that blood and a mess is such a great concern? I have a fish cleaning station with a sink and water next to my house. I don't care how much blood gets anywhere. I use the hose attached to the sink and rinse everything as necessary. Local feral cats clean up any leftovers on the ground.
 

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Serious question: where are you guys cleaning fish that blood and a mess is such a great concern? I have a fish cleaning station with a sink and water next to my house. I don't care how much blood gets anywhere. I use the hose attached to the sink and rinse everything as necessary. Local feral cats clean up any leftovers on the ground.
Cleaning station with a double sink and faucet on the dock, right into the bay...:) Never is that messy regardless, I was thinking the same... It's not like you are slitting a cow's jugular...:D
 

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Guys, bleed EVERY FISH YOU INTEND TO EAT. In fact, bleeding is just one step in the proper way to "field dress" your catch on the boat.

Read the links below and follow the simple steps to prepare your catch utilizing the Japanese IKI JIMI method, I've been doing it for years now and swear to you it makes a huge difference!

http://www.anglers-secrets.com/how-to-keep-fish-fresh/
And
http://www.anglers-secrets.com/what-closing-does-to-the-fish/

That's good for a quality tuna but unnecessary for small white fish. Just bleed them and do as I mentioned above, letting it sit for a couple days and it's nice and 'relaxed'.
Same results. I'm not gonna Iki every single small fish, I'm busy fishin and catchin....:)
 

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Serious question: where are you guys cleaning fish that blood and a mess is such a great concern? I have a fish cleaning station with a sink and water next to my house. I don't care how much blood gets anywhere. I use the hose attached to the sink and rinse everything as necessary. Local feral cats clean up any leftovers on the ground.
I clean almost everything in the kitchen, next to the sink, right on top of my wife's granite counter top. Screw the heat, the green flies and the gnats. Give me the AC, the tv on, and peace.

Racks go from the counter top to a 5 gallon bucket, and from there to either the lagoon, the crab cage, or the garbage pail.

Filets get rinsed if need be, patted dry, and go right in the fridge. No baking in the sun, no marauding sea gulls, no worries about taking a pee break halfway through.

If it's something big, like a tuna, then I loin them outside, but prep the loins inside.
 

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That's good for a quality tuna but unnecessary for small white fish. Just bleed them and do as I mentioned above, letting it sit for a couple days and it's nice and 'relaxed'.
Same results. I'm not gonna Iki every single small fish, I'm busy fishin and catchin....:)
I agree that bleeding the fish and letting it age is the least you should do.
However the eating quality of small white fleshed fish also benefit tremendously from the full IKI JIMI treatment.

It really does not take much time to stab its brain, slit a gill and stab a tail bone....the wire along the spine to destroy the nervous system is optional but it does help to keep the meat fresh longer.

Remember, the Japanese have been doing this for hundreds of years before refrigeration was invented...and who eats more fish than them?

Click on the links I provided and see the pics of the Flounders comparing a fish that was left to die "as-is" in a cooler vs one that had been processed properly with the IKI JIMI procedure....IT IS LIKE NIGHT AND DAY.
 

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Definitely bleed them out as soon as they are caught but do not touch them with fresh water until you are ready to cook them freshwater destroys the meat
 

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We always bleed them by cutting the gill plates and hang them over the side until all the blood is washed out. We also learned a little trick a few years back in that we bring a fresh 5 gal bucket or 2 of ocean water back to the cleaning station to rinse the fillets in it with them never having tap water touch the meat especially if you leave them in the refrig for a couple of days before eating of freezing. Try a test with one bag rinsed with sea water and the other with tap water and you can smell the difference after a day of in the fridge.
 

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We always bleed them by cutting the gill plates and hang them over the side until all the blood is washed out. We also learned a little trick a few years back in that we bring a fresh 5 gal bucket or 2 of ocean water back to the cleaning station to rinse the fillets in it with them never having tap water touch the meat especially if you leave them in the refrig for a couple of days before eating of freezing. Try a test with one bag rinsed with sea water and the other with tap water and you can smell the difference after a day of in the fridge.

100% right about the salt water bucket rinse...you must have been reading my old posts on Florida Sportsman. :)
http://forums.floridasportsman.com/...ackerel-(and-how-to-treat-your-catch-as-FOOD)
 

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If you lift up the gill plates you will see a piece of thin skin (you can see the blood under it), cut this and they will bleed out like crazy, better then cutting the gills.
 
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