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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw this vid on youtube. Link below, but the kid in RI didn't really show the rig. Anybody ever done this or seen it done? Freshwater mags were writing about it a few years ago for pike and smallmouth bass. I could see it working in freshwater, especially some of the spots in Canada I've fished. Wind blowing up against a rocky bluff with disoriented bait suspended in the rough water. Floats are making a comeback for livelining bunker. Could this work in rough water in the surf with a heavier bucktail. Hmmm...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbzPgug7n-g
 

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But if you're going to work it like a bucktail, why the float?
I can see it if your drifting it off a jetty tip or boat...

Hey Mike, THAT is a striper...:D
 

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i've seen this a few times on island beach state park usually the old timers
run this setup on picky weakfish..large float white/red 2" or more diamater to a 3/4 or 1 oz, bucktail..it works pretty good
have also seen a couple guys rig a float dropper loop float setup to get it out to fish feeding beyond casting distance, only works on an outgoing tide..saw a few blues picked up this way
 

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Seems like a shortcut to me to avoid selecting the right size bucktail? The fact that he caught an 18" bass does not legitamize the rig.

If you are going to work it like that why not use a naked popper with the leader tied off the a$$?

I dont doubt that someone could find a good use for catching bass on a jig under a bobber, but for casting and retrieving in the surf I would have to suggest alternate methods.

RyanF
 

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A passed on, and sorely missed, surf sharpie by the name of Charlie Trost use to use this method quite a bit for fluke. He'd even go as small as a shad dart in place of the bucktail. He would hammer fluke, especially on a falling tide since the current would want to pull the float out and he could nudge it back ever so gently keeping it right in the break (& bite) zone. The up & down motion of the dart/bucktail w/o really any movement side to side was the major plus versus a straight retrieve. The constant bouncing in the strike zone gave the fluke more time to find it and hit.

He won many a summer tournament with fluke while everyone else was trying for kingfish or blues. Still a great tactic to employ but the size limits on fluke make it tough. 18+ inches from land and a season closure in early Sept sux.
 

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These are commonly used in RI for throwing small bucktails and soft bodies. Connect the main to the castingfloat/ball, run 3 feet of more of leader from the ball to the bucktail. The ball has a small in its side , hang the hook on the nail and cast (can really get some distance). Hook will fall off the nail when the float hits the water. Use slow retreive or popping retrieve. Can be very deadly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
These are commonly used in RI for throwing small bucktails and soft bodies. Connect the main to the castingfloat/ball, run 3 feet of more of leader from the ball to the bucktail. The ball has a small in its side , hang the hook on the nail and cast (can really get some distance). Hook will fall off the nail when the float hits the water. Use slow retreive or popping retrieve. Can be very deadly.
Thanks for the info RI (and circlehook and apalmer too). I can see how it would work to get a small bait out farther when they are on spearing or something that size. Not sure I'm sold on it, but it's cool to see what different regions do. And when you read the old surf fishing books you see all kinds of things that used to work (and probably still would) but fell out of favor.
 

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A passed on, and sorely missed, surf sharpie by the name of Charlie Trost use to use this method quite a bit for fluke. He'd even go as small as a shad dart in place of the bucktail. He would hammer fluke, especially on a falling tide since the current would want to pull the float out and he could nudge it back ever so gently keeping it right in the break (& bite) zone. The up & down motion of the dart/bucktail w/o really any movement side to side was the major plus versus a straight retrieve. The constant bouncing in the strike zone gave the fluke more time to find it and hit.

He won many a summer tournament with fluke while everyone else was trying for kingfish or blues. Still a great tactic to employ but the size limits on fluke make it tough. 18+ inches from land and a season closure in early Sept sux.
Now that would sense. I guess the whole dropping tide thing makes sense, but I still dont see it being too useful unless you go as small as a dart.

RyanF
 

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i don't see why this wouldn't work. i use alot of freshwater tactics in the salt. mainly in the early spring. i go to some well known spots in the spring and catch very well with a carolina rig rubber worm when most people are using high dollar blood worms. keep it simple and get back to basics. what works in fresh will work in salt. fish are fish! :D
 

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These are commonly used in RI for throwing small bucktails and soft bodies. Connect the main to the castingfloat/ball, run 3 feet of more of leader from the ball to the bucktail. The ball has a small in its side , hang the hook on the nail and cast (can really get some distance). Hook will fall off the nail when the float hits the water. Use slow retreive or popping retrieve. Can be very deadly.
RI is correct, I used this technique when fishing up in RI this fall did ok on schoolies. However, all the guys up there do it because on the rocky shores of RI it's almost impossible to fish bucktails as you would on sandy beaches in NJ-it's more practical than a "technique." You would get hung up every 2 feet on those boulder fields. At least this is the reason everyone told me, and it made sense to me. I tried without a float and got hung up, had to cut the line, went back to the float. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
RI is correct, I used this technique when fishing up in RI this fall did ok on schoolies. However, all the guys up there do it because on the rocky shores of RI it's almost impossible to fish bucktails as you would on sandy beaches in NJ-it's more practical than a "technique." You would get hung up every 2 feet on those boulder fields. At least this is the reason everyone told me, and it made sense to me. I tried without a float and got hung up, had to cut the line, went back to the float. ;)
That makes a lot of sense. Thanks for the info.
 

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That makes a lot of sense. Thanks for the info.
You're welcome. BTW, RI or NJ -bucktails work... period!!! I tell ppl. all the time- get to know the areas you are fishing, and get to know them with bucktails. You can catch stipers all year long anywhere with bucktails when fished properly- I can't say that about any other plug or artificial.
 
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