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I was just wondering... I thought fish are color blind. If fish are color blind, all those jigs, lures, poppers, bucktails, etc. with different colors.... all those are just our fantasy to catch more fish?
Even if fish are color blind, I am sure they can see different gray level. If my assumption is right then wouldn't it be better to make all those lures with just different pattern with different gray level? Just a thought...:confused:
 

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Can fish see colors

Some I believe can distinguish shades of color, may not see our red as such ,might be a shade of gray etc. I've always believed that color plays a role in anglers choice while lure action ,presentation etc etc etc do the rest. Also water clarity has to play a role in that as well, turbid water vs clear ,running etc changes a lot. If your a trout fish then you might feel matching the hatch in some form is the way to go. However many times on the same day I caught trout on streamers, I also took them on metal!
Ditto tuna many days dark lures fished side by side with chrome hds, both caught other days one was favored. If I knew those answers I wouldn't be here with everyone else terying to figure out fish!!
Presentation, conditions, season, & of course finding the fish is probably more important than lure color but we all buy what we like colorwise anyhow! Remember also that the hot color varies from season to season some time, know why? We all switch to what we hear is now hot,maybe those old colors from years back are just as good ,however no ones using them now! When I was growing up probably 80% of anglers both fresh & salt used red head, white body, plugs ,see many of those used today?
Remember those bass pros that would use those had to have color selectors, how come they are not around anymore? If it was that easy then hell the fun would be taken out of the fishing expierance!!
 

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What I can tell you about my 40+ years of fishing. I have seen one guy using one cooler bait and another guy with the same bait but a different cooler catch more fish. Then in the same area on another day the cooler that didn't catch was the bait for the day.

I do belive that cooler makes differance. Fresh water or salt.
 

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My opinion. Yes, fish definitly see color. Just using pure logic, it would be hard to figure it any other way. Time and time again, with all things being equal, presentation, location in spread, lure action, speed, etc, fish often favor one color over another. Whether there vision is processing the colors of the rainbow as ours do is another question, but they have to see a difference or they could never be selective like they are. And of course this helps sales, as many guys want to be prepared for whatever is most effective during any given season on any given day. Like one of our customers, who often targets whites, came running over and had to have another one of our Pink Tiger splash bars. Earlier that week they raised 3 whites and all three came up on the pink tiger. Another thing I have notice is that color can be a regional thing, as we seem to sell more of some colors depending if you are in the North East, South East, Gulf or the pacific. Some of that I do believe is not because of the fish, but is also a factor of the local fisherman buzz in that area.
 

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If remembering correctly from my scuba diving days, once you get below one atmosphere or so (33ft,) due to sunlight refraction or some other scientific crap, most vibrant colors are absorbed and what ya gots left is blue (unless of course an artificial light source is used.) This I can attest to as I used to fancy myself an underwater photog - sucked at it by the way (using a very expensive Nikonos.)
 

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Yes some preditors can see color. I saw a cool experiment with sharks on Discovery not too long ago. They were testing life vests by dropping a manikin down into shark infested waters with different colored vests on. The sharks showed aggression towards the yellow and red vests. It showed no aggression toward black, blue and green. I would think that the fish who are not at the top of the chain or that live in deep waters with no light penetration do not have as developed sight as sharks and other apex preditors though. Its all about how they evolved.
 

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yes fish can see color

Sterling Tackle has it correct. They must have some sort of color preference on certain days:) I can also say from expierence the "Sterling Takle" Pink Tiger splash bars work luck a charm and have raised many fish for the Mucho Clams:D I have have a few other colors from S/T in case I need to switch colors:thumbsup:
 

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If remembering correctly from my scuba diving days, once you get below one atmosphere or so (33ft,) due to sunlight refraction or some other scientific crap, most vibrant colors are absorbed and what ya gots left is blue (unless of course an artificial light source is used.) This I can attest to as I used to fancy myself an underwater photog - sucked at it by the way (using a very expensive Nikonos.)
Reds the first color to go at one atmosphere below the surface... I remember when I cut my knuckle at 60 feet by accident and the blood looked green.
 

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One could argue that the predators are most often searching for bait that is first, realistic. Most baits are silverish with perhaps a 'topping' of blue, green,etc. These baits also have an iridessence of colors that show as they change angles to a light source. On a sunny day the source is called a "point light source', cloudy days, a 'diffused light source' each having it's own visual effect to the predator. That might be why a color is hot today and not tomorrow. Atmospheric conditions display color, shading and contrast differently, thus each bait reflects differently. Perhaps a certain color works best with ceratin lights.
Also would most here agree that there are regional colors? It seems that Green/yellow, black/purple are consistant fish cachers here in the northeast, while pink and blue might be good further south.
One thing for sure, it keeps us guessing.:huh:
 

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My opinion. Yes, fish definitly see color. Just using pure logic, it would be hard to figure it any other way. Time and time again, with all things being equal, presentation, location in spread, lure action, speed, etc, fish often favor one color over another. Whether there vision is processing the colors of the rainbow as ours do is another question, but they have to see a difference or they could never be selective like they are. And of course this helps sales, as many guys want to be prepared for whatever is most effective during any given season on any given day. Like one of our customers, who often targets whites, came running over and had to have another one of our Pink Tiger splash bars. Earlier that week they raised 3 whites and all three came up on the pink tiger. Another thing I have notice is that color can be a regional thing, as we seem to sell more of some colors depending if you are in the North East, South East, Gulf or the pacific. Some of that I do believe is not because of the fish, but is also a factor of the local fisherman buzz in that area.
Read this article! The 14th paragraph is where the author talks about Pelagic fish.Or you can see for yourself and do what we did and enter the water swim down 50ft and look at lures on the surface and out in front of you! you may be surprised at what you see.
http://www.midcurrent.com/articles/science/ross_color.aspx
 

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It is safe to say that all of the species of fish we seek have color vision. There are some species of fish that have no color vision and some that are completely blind but none of these are our targets. Coloration in the marine environment is more important for some of the species we fish for then others. As humans, we tend to downplay the sensory apparatus of the fish we seek.

In general though, I think it is the intensity of the coloration that is more important then the color itself. For example, bright colors such as yellow, chartreuse, and white may all perform equally well. I also think that shape, and more importantly motion, is more important then coloration in the feeding behavior of fish.

We should also be careful when attributing colors of our lures to success. For example, a fluke fisherman may say green is working really well for him. Another angler may switch to green and have no luck. The reality of rigs is that two are never exactly the same and may undulate quite differently. Each angler also fishes differently and may have a different rod, line diameter, etc. A very controlled experiment would be needed to indeed say that it is the specific color that is making the difference. As mentioned, it may be the intensity of the color that is making a difference. Also, coloration success will vary with brightness of the day, time of day, clarity of water, depth of water, and other factors.

We also tend to think of colors in human terms. For example, if you use a pink rig in 80 feet of water and ask a scuba diver at that same depth what color he sees, he will report gray coloration. If he however, uses a flash and takes a picture of your lure, it will show up pink in the picture. As one proceeds in depths, coloration is gradually lost, at least to our eyes. No one knows if fish are able to see colors better or differently then we do at depths.
 
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