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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Read this in the APP today:

Loggerhead turtles may join the endangered list

Watch out they are trying to hit us at all angles. Oceana is the driving force to this one

Here is the paragraph that got my attention:

Environmental activists have called for wider application of such safe guards, and the use of seasonal area closures and more fisheries observers. "They will be looking at critical habitat, both on land and in the water," Brogan said. "We've been advocates of time-area closures for a long time." Controlling fishing activity in turtle migration areas could be like the "dynamic area management" the government uses to protect northern right whales by imposing speed limits on ships.

If they get the endangered listing for loggerheads you can bet they will close vast areas to fishing

The full article:
http://www.app.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=20103110341
 

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You cant ignore this things,when a species is endangered like this one you have to do something.Looks like this will affect comms more than recs.If adding safe-guards such as escape routes for turtles in nets will help I'm all for it.If this reduces catches by 30-40 % per tow ,so be it.It seems we have alot of closures getting thrown at use lately,but we've been overfishing and reducing stock numbers for so long it had to catch up with us at some point....
 

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You cant ignore this things,when a species is endangered like this one you have to do something.Looks like this will affect comms more than recs.If adding safe-guards such as escape routes for turtles in nets will help I'm all for it.If this reduces catches by 30-40 % per tow ,so be it.It seems we have alot of closures getting thrown at use lately,but we've been overfishing and reducing stock numbers for so long it had to catch up with us at some point....

This is the exact attitude that will soon have us all sitting well inland of any beach just trying to catch a glimpse of the waters that we once enjoyed.

No, there is nothing wrong with protecting endangered species and doing what we can to conserve resources, eliminate bycatch and so on. Anything within reason is acceptable. Unfortunately, environmental rules being proposed these days are anything but reasonable. The most endangered species we now face is a free American - all at the cost of some unknown bird, a species of moss or even a turtle. When will we stand up to protect ourselves??
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is the exact attitude that will soon have us all sitting well inland of any beach just trying to catch a glimpse of the waters that we once enjoyed.

No, there is nothing wrong with protecting endangered species and doing what we can to conserve resources, eliminate bycatch and so on. Anything within reason is acceptable. Unfortunately, environmental rules being proposed these days are anything but reasonable. The most endangered species we now face is a free American - all at the cost of some unknown bird, a species of moss or even a turtle. When will we stand up to protect ourselves??

I agree with the safe guards against bycatch and methods to safeguard the demise of a species, but closing vast areas of water because some turtles were spotted seems way extreme to me. I fish the midshore grounds all summer and see turtles all over does this mean I will not be able to fish these spots!!! You can bet the enviros will be "seeing turtles" all over even if they are not there. Maybe the best way to stop the decline is to protect the nesting areas. But that closes the beaches. Just like the other post that wants to save a few herring with buckets when millions are killed in pair trawl vessels. Kinda defeats the point don't you think
 

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THIS IS A SLOW, WELL ORGANIZED, SYSTEMATIC APPROACH to shut down fisheries. Each individual action is relatively painless - but when you add up EVERYTHING that is happening - we are in real trouble.

I love when people chime in with "I have seen no law to close fisheries - you guys always think the sky is falling"


The sky might not be falling - but the wheels are in motion fo pull it down one foot at a time from several different places.
 

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THIS IS A SLOW, WELL ORGANIZED, SYSTEMATIC APPROACH to shut down fisheries. Each individual action is relatively painless - but when you add up EVERYTHING that is happening - we are in real trouble.

I love when people chime in with "I have seen no law to close fisheries - you guys always think the sky is falling"


The sky might not be falling - but the wheels are in motion fo pull it down one foot at a time from several different places.
Sean, Well said:thumbsup:, and the absolute truth!

I know that a lot of our rants here may seem overly alarmist to many. But let me ask, when SHOULD we get angry - AFTER we are kicked off the water or at the time a threat is first recognized?? We need to be proactive in our fight, not simply reactive once the damage is done.

Again, I say....

VOTE THEM OUT IN NOVEMBER!
 

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Loggerheads have been listed endangered since 1978.

Regulatory Overview
The loggerhead turtle was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as threatened throughout its range on July 28, 1978.


I believe an animal has to be listed as endangered or threatened for a period of time before it is provided protection- then after a period of time it can qualify for protection under the endangered species act. I understand that since it has been listed as threatened for quite some time- they are now seeking the additional protection which could ultimately close fisheries.

http://www.fws.gov/endangered/wildlife.html
 

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This was the Whale Center of New England's take on the issue which is a big partner with the Stellwagen Bank Marine National Sanctuary

"
Although loggerheads are seen off the Massachusetts coast, they mostly surface around Cape Cod, in its bay and on its eastern shore, according to Mason Weinrich, executive director and chief scientist of the Whale Center of New England, based at Gloucester's Harbor Loop.
"We see them occasionally get up here," he said. "They travel the warm waters of the Gulf Stream, but their distribution really goes down about the cape (Cape Cod), coming to the north. When we do see them its usually in Stellwagen Bank."


The next step will be they could get caught fishing both recreational and commercial so shut down Stellwagen to all fishing. Another back door approach and blaming fisherman.


I liked one fisherman's take, "not enough undisturbed beaches and too many lights, time to move the people back away from the nesting sites and stop blaming the fisherman".



Capt Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here is another quote from the story it explains their take on "Threatened and endangered" Yes they were listed threatened but now are going for endangered. The quote says it all,


"It tightens the regulations," said Gib Brogan of the environmental group Oceana, which sought the endangered listing. "When a species is threatened, there are some exemptions (for human activities). But when a species goes up the list to endangered — meaning it's in danger of extinction — those loopholes go away."


I like the use of the term "loopholes", meaning we are using a backdoor or semi illegal way to circumvent the laws which is not true in any way.
 
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