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Last Friday bringing the boat out of WW, my bud and I were approached by a CO...

I was damn excited to see him...!!! :D

We didn't have much to speak of (7 blues and 1 keeper flattie @ 18)...
But he checked the cooler, joked with us about the lack of flounder and wished us a good season...

In conversation, he told me something I thought was shocking...

He said out of 50 COs for the state only 12 do maritime...

Personally, I'd like to see more of them...!!!

That's a lot of coast for 12 people...


Anyway...

Just curious if anybody else ran into them this weekend...???

Best Wishes and Tight Lines as always...


Muddy
 

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The coast guard and the marine police patrol Sea Isle. Have not been boarded "this year" yet. But it is only a matter of time. Normally, I fish with 3-4 guys in their 30's. We are a target.
 

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There used to only be 8. They can pul people from other area's when they need them.

[ 06-02-2004, 09:03 AM: Message edited by: Bob ECT ]
 

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I run from them......errrr...into them all the time during waterfowl season. :D
 

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I saw the CO's on friday behind NWW, but we werent stopped...the Troopers have been visible every trip I have taken this spring...both on the ICW and patroling beach creek...glad to see them out and about..
 

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NJ's Marine Conservation Officers Using Progressive Techniques to Protect Wildlife

By Capt. Joe Meyer
5/26/2004/NJ Fish&Game


There's a saying among long-time sportsmen -- just because you don't see the game wardens doesn't mean they aren't watching. That bit of wisdom is even truer today.

Undercover law enforcement has become an integral part of managing New Jersey's natural resources, particularly along the state's ocean and bays. The guy clad in jeans and fishing gear aboard your party boat might look like just another angler, but he could be a state conservation officer in plainclothes. Now more than ever, members of Bureau of Law Enforcement's Marine Region within Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP) Division of Fish and Wildlife are using non-traditional surveillance methods to net serious offenders who often go to great lengths to break laws and regulations that protect the state's fish and wildlife.

Such undercover operations are proving to be particularly effective. In the past year alone, plainclothes conservation officers cracked two significant cases involving the illegal harvest and unlawful sale of marine species.

In one case, the owner of a Middletown tavern was charged with selling large quantities of undersized lobsters. Several reliable sources informed state marine lawmen that the tavern was being used as a clearinghouse for undersized American lobsters. Acting on the information, officers went undercover, frequenting the establishment and gathering and documenting evidence during a 12-month investigation that included purchases of more than 1,400 undersized lobster tails.

Harvesting undersized lobsters removes them from the ocean before they have a chance to reproduce. The case represented the first time the Division of Fish and Wildlife and the state Attorney General's Criminal Justice Division prosecuted a New Jersey business owner for knowingly selling undersized lobsters.

The tavern owner, indicted on charges of unlawfully selling wildlife, pleaded guilty and agreed to pay a $50,000 penalty.

In the second case, officers issued more than 100 summonses in connection with a party-boat operation illegally harvesting and commercializing tautog, a variety of fish popular in sushi restaurants. In all, 22 defendants, including the vessel's captain and the corporation that owns the party boat, either pleaded guilty or were found guilty on charges stemming from the 18-month undercover investigation. The defendants faced penalties totaling more than $40,000.

Marine conservation officers also keep a close eye on established fish markets, where some dealers are only too anxious to give law-breaking anglers a place to peddle their illegal catch. During February, lawmen conducted inspections at 18 fish markets in Jersey City and Newark, issuing written warnings and summonses for illegal sales of blue crabs and striped bass, and other violations.

New Jersey's law-abiding anglers can assist conservation officers in their efforts to protect fish and wildlife resources by reporting marine fish and shellfish violations to 609-748-2050. Or, call the 24-hour, DEP hotline at 877-WARN-DEP.

Capt. Meyer is a member of Fish and Wildlife's Bureau of Law Enforcement's Marine Region.

[ 06-03-2004, 01:18 PM: Message edited by: NIGHTSTRIKES ]
 

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I see the State police every trip and the CG every other. I have to say they are gentlemen. Two troopers motor within 4 feet to read my Reg. Orange is good for PA. Very courteous and it's great to see them out there especially with all the guys and girls who do not know what they are doing out there. Be careful!

Tight lines!
Cheers

Pround RFA member
 

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i was stopped at fort. 2 weeks ago at the aa.
they checked our fish and asked a few questions.
i asked him, "where's all the fish at". he said,
"there ain't none, u guys did better than most
with two keepers"

i was happy to see them out there checkin.

andy
 

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i have a problem with only one part,

WHY take 12 or 14 months to bust someone? don't you think it can be done faster ? why let em go on selling illegal fish or lostbers for so long...it seems just plain worng. pop em & stop em! and go on figthing crimes some where elese...

sure i can see building a case helps to get a larger fine,but if the crooks are doing it for a month or two it's not a one time deal or just one load of undersize/illegal game. sorry but a year or more just seems a waste to me! dosen't anyone see it this way ? my.02 cent

freedom ots.
 

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Originally posted by Fred81876:
should we be more concerned about Homeland Security instead of short fish???? I do not get along with the CO's very well.
wha was the problem??most are good guys.

freedom---that's the first thing i thought of also.
 

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Freedom/ As soon as it is clear to f and w that the case involves comercial sale of wildlife then it becomes a much more serious crime. Now the priority is not to just catch the fisherman but the people down the chain of possesion who are profiting from the poaching. This takes a lot more time and manpower but when you put the buyer's out of business you put many poachers out of business even those that werent caught.
Fines for comercial violations are much higher than for a recreational fisherman caght with the same violation.
Barrell
 

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About 3-4 weeks ago, I had a woman CO approach my anchored craft, from my stern, right through my chum slick. It was a little choppy out, and as she came along my port side (into the wind), her bow swung around and slammed into my boat. I was pissed, but said nothing. If they are gonna harrass people, they should at least learn how to handle a freakin' boat.
 

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NIGHTSTRIKES i have battled with the CO's on more than one occasion with high attorney fees, I was a coom. fisherman for a long time and have many problems with them, although there is one that i get along with and his name is Scott Risher, as far as the rest of them go they are more concerned with writing tickets than with consevation, i could tell you some very interesting stories....
 
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