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Discussion Starter #1

I plan on buying this little guy, then also putting a boat collar on it as well to help make it more stable.Can it take on the bay? Or should I just stick to the river, and stay close to the cost?
 

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Word bay can be very misleading. If you are referring to the Delaware bay I would not take that on it. D. Bay is very unpredictable and can get very nasty very fast
What wave height can it get to? Also I herd to find what wave height the boat can take it is 1/3 * the feet of the boat. Is that correct?
 

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Ugh .....take the advice offered .

Del Bay tide vs wind turns it dangerous real quick ..

If it’s flat calm with marine forecast of winds “ light and variable” all day sure you can mess around a bit — but that boats best kept close to shore and in the river
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wow, yeah, I'll just stay close to the shore and the river!

Still, is that 1/3 * boat length thing real? or just something false I found on the internet?
 

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The bay can get ugly and very nasty in the blink of an eye. Wind gusts can come out of nowhere and really turn things up quick- I have a 17' CC and I have experienced it get nasty twice. I wouldn't take that trailer in the river either- those tug boat wakes can swamp a small floating trailer like that. That thing is meant for calm shallow lakes if you ask me. Not trying to sound rude, I just don't want to see/read about you getting hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The bay can get ugly and very nasty in the blink of an eye. Wind gusts can come out of nowhere and really turn things up quick- I have a 17' CC and I have experienced it get nasty twice. I wouldn't take that trailer in the river either- those tug boat wakes can swamp a small floating trailer like that. That thing is meant for calm shallow lakes if you ask me. Not trying to sound rude, I just don't want to see/read about you getting hurt.
well, if the 1/3 * length rule is true, then the sealander can take 4.5 feet waves. And I plan on putting this on it


Would that help in the river?
 

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I have never heard of the 1/3 rule and I don’t know how a blanket statement like that would be accurate. Boats are built differently for different conditions. 4.5 foot waves in the De. Bay would be miserable in my 21 foot boat and would mean strong winds. The sea lander has a lot of surface area and I think it would be hard to maneuver in those conditions, currents in the bay would also be a big factor.
 

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I have never heard of the 1/3 rule and I don’t know how a blanket statement like that would be accurate. Boats are built differently for different conditions. 4.5 foot waves in the De. Bay would be miserable in my 21 foot boat and would mean strong winds. The sea lander has a lot of surface area and I think it would be hard to maneuver in those conditions, currents in the bay would also be a big factor.
What about the river?


Edit: I found the rule here



"A rule of thumb is 1/3 of your boat length is what your boat can reasonably handle. Obviously, with seamanship, you can take more but the math is against you. Think a boat a boat balanced on a wave 50% of the length. The boat can go down at a 45% angle. So on a 30' boat will take 10' waves. It is the period of the waves that counts though. I have been out in 12' swells in my 30' and had a gentle ride. I've been in 10' dicey and 6' horrible."
 

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I went and read all the posts and I think he was referring to that specific boat, sea ray. Can’t give any opinion on a river
 

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I went and read all the posts and I think he was referring to that specific boat, sea ray. Can’t give any opinion on a river
By river, I meant the Delaware river.

Also, are you sure? Cause I just found this Dangerous waves and your boat - Ocean Navigator


"To determine dangerous wave heights and lengths for your boat, you can use these formulas:
Danger Wave Height
W Height = B Length x 30%


Danger Wave Length
W Length < = W Height x 7 "

Which, gives the same as 1/3 * boat length.
 

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Stability is not the same thing as being able to handle rough seas. Pontoon boats are extremely stable but are only suitable for small bays and lakes. I've never heard of the 1/3rd rule but it doesn't seem credible. The sea state is more than just wave height - it's also about the wave period. In the bay the period is generally relatively short which is much worse than a long period. I have an 18 ft. boat and 2 ft. waves are uncomfortable and approaching 3 ft. waves it's time to carefully head for port. IMHO I would not take the Sealander out in more than 1.5 ft. waves.
 

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I've been told that the Delaware Bay is one of the roughest Bay's in the World. This is due to it being shaped like a wide shallow bowl overall. It can get rocking rough rather quickly.

As an aside, Back in my 20's I went out on my friends Boat in the Delaware Bay, it was a little rough that day and I said to him... Is this as fast as this boat goes? And he said NO, this is as fast as my Hemorrhoids will let it go :ROFLMAO: Hadn't seen him in 20 years since and then I found him here on the BassBarn (y)

As to that Boat only taking a 9 hp motor and reading the website, considering winds & currents, I'd say you'd be better off staying in the Freshwater with it. It looks like a really neat concept, but I'd have better confidence being on flat freshwater lakes and mellow Inland rivers to be safe and fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've been told that the Delaware Bay is one of the roughest Bay's in the World. This is due to it being shaped like a wide shallow bowl overall. It can get rocking rough rather quickly.

As an aside, Back in my 20's I went out on my friends Boat in the Delaware Bay, it was a little rough that day and I said to him... Is this as fast as this boat goes? And he said NO, this is as fast as my Hemorrhoids will let it go :ROFLMAO: Hadn't seen him in 20 years since and then I found him here on the BassBarn (y)

As to that Boat only taking a 9 hp motor and reading the website, considering winds & currents, I'd say you'd be better off staying in the Freshwater with it. It looks like a really neat concept, but I'd have better confidence being on flat freshwater lakes and mellow Inland rivers to be safe and fun.
Do you think it would be OK on the delawere river?
 

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The River can be just a crazy. Our Marinia is by Boeing. On a nice day things can be great then the tide shifts against the wind and lookout.
 
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IMO No anybody that has any experience on the Del. river knows when the tide is running out and the river is ( as always running out ) that water is moving fast and a 9.9 hp motor will not push that boat against the water moving at best you will be sitting in one spot while you have the motor at full rpm and chances are if the wind is in the same direction as the current with the motor flat out rpm you'll still be going backwards.
 
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Do you think it would be OK on the delawere river?
Yes ,
On very nice calm days .
You have to watch the weather and check the tides.
If you motor somewhere go with the outgoing tide , but remember to get back ,you will need the help of the incoming tide .
Better yet , mabey just stick to going on big lakes ,
the element of risk and danger is much lower to consider .
 
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