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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys (Gals):
I’ve been lurking around this board for awhile, reading and definitely learning a lot. Mostly I’ve read the board to keep tabs on the stripers as they approached the Delaware Bay area. However after reading some posts here and elsewhere online, I want to give the Big D a shot. I’ve tried it in the past, half heartedly and with limited success.

I have several questions, which I’m hoping to get some help with. First off, my boat is a 17 foot flat bottom Tracker with a 30HP jet motor. The man who I bought the boat off, during my first year of college, used the boat for shad fishing around Trenton. At least that is what he told me. I kinda believe him when he gave me the boat with several large anchors, downriggers, etc… So my question, am I ok fishing in the Yardley area of the river and points North? My second question regarding the boat aspect, what is the bottom composition? So I know what type of anchor I should be looking at. I assume that I want to anchor to do my live lining or casting? After reading on this board I understand I will be required to have the NJ boating license in addition to the PA boat license. Which I’m working on the NJ portion, already have the PA.

Next segment of my questioning is bait/lures. I think my first and easiest way to start would be to use live bait, FF rigs with herring. My question though, since I’m more an artificial guy, can you use these instead of live bait? For example, swimbaits, eel, sandworm, bloodworm imitations, rattle traps, etc…

Any help anyone can give, I would appreciate it. If not on this board, my email is [email protected]

Thanks a bunch,
Matt
 

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First welcome to the Barn I think you will like it here.:D :D
Don't know if I can answer all of your questions but I suggest that you also post these questions in the Freshwater forum. Many of the people on that forum fish the Yardley section of the river.
It sure sounds like you have the correct type of boat for that section of the river. It also sounds like you already have the correct type of anchor most people use grappling hooks usually made of rebar to caught the rocks in that area. Which helps me answer another part of your question, bottom composition. It is generally rocky with some arear of hard pack and that is why the rebar anchors work so well.
Live lining is the thing to do once the herring get here but I am pretty sure you are going to have to go a bit south to catch them. I am sure that blood worms would work and have heard of people getting stripers with plugs but once the herring get here they are most certainly the bait of choice.

Good luck
 

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As Gabtrid stated the grappling hook style anchor is the best for the river. And yes you do have the correct boat to be able to run the Yardly area but I would advise you to find someone who knows that part of the river and either have them show you the proper route or follow someone up. Scudders falls can be a little tricky later in the season. And there are a few spots that can get pretty shallow north of there. It will be a little hair raising the first few times you do it. You WILL run out of water a few times, ding your boat, bend grates on your intake but that is just part of the learning curve. Just keep an eye on the water in front of you and you will be fine.
As far as live lining, mix it up. You can drift live herring without weight or you can anchor up and use a fishfinder rig. Just remember, inline circle hooks!
I do not do much with artificials but know people who love it. Just find a spot that looks fishy and plug away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the welcome and information guys. Maybe you can't answer, but whats a safe level (on the gage) to run these areas. Maybe a better way to put it, when can I not run these areas.

Yeah, I've been stock piling circle hooks, sab....rigs, weight, leaders, etc...Good thing rebar is in stock at work!

Thanks again for the info. I appreciate it!!
 

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"After reading on this board I understand I will be required to have the NJ boating license in addition to the PA boat license. Which I’m working on the NJ portion, already have the PA."
My understanding is that if your a PA resident, and only boating in NJ waters incidently, (less than 90 days) your PA boating license is all you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Imcap10ED said:
"After reading on this board I understand I will be required to have the NJ boating license in addition to the PA boat license. Which I’m working on the NJ portion, already have the PA."
My understanding is that if your a PA resident, and only boating in NJ waters incidently, (less than 90 days) your PA boating license is all you need.
I think just CYA, I'll have both on board. :)
 

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mkoloch said:
Thanks for the welcome and information guys. Maybe you can't answer, but whats a safe level (on the gage) to run these areas. Maybe a better way to put it, when can I not run these areas.

Yeah, I've been stock piling circle hooks, sab....rigs, weight, leaders, etc...Good thing rebar is in stock at work!

Thanks again for the info. I appreciate it!!
Later in the summer it gets kind of sketchy. Just try to spend as much time on the water as you can and you will learn it pretty quick.
 

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here is my advice to a newbie running a jet. I was there once and this is what I learned.

when in doubt, don't back off the throttle or your dentist will be replacing teeth. if you think you are going to run out of water - you probably will. if you think you are going to run out of water and you slow down, the boat will drop lower in the water and more than not, it'll be can opener city. Might as well send your boat down to the campbell soup factory in Camden. They are always on the look out for more tin cans.

Look, I am not trying to scare you. Rather trying to let you know it is better to hit a rock expecting to glance off her rather than stop and bottom out. Use your head up there and you'll be fine. the guys that scare me are the ones that get all excited over big fish and begin loosing perspective. those guys get the horseblinders on and that is when bad things happen. I see it year after year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Chris,
I appreciate the REAL deal report. I have been running my jetboat for roughly six years. I am pretty good at knowing whats its capable of. Hitting is part of the game in river fishing.

I fully expect to do some serious scouting prior to making any runs through rapids. Spending time on the water is the best learning tool. Since everyone seems to be confident my boat will be ok for this area, I'll definitely be putting my time in. I just was not sure how 'open' the area was. I've been on the Susquehanna Flats before, Turkey Point and that wind kicks up, YICKS!

Thanks again for the information.
 

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I navigated by treetops that day because the last time that happened my track trail got me into trouble. I don't trust it anymore.

see you on the water

chris
 
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