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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, wanted to see what your opinions are on this. I have a 12' fishsing raft (yeah I know haha) and a Minn Kota 30lbs trust trolling motor.

My question is, I take it in lakes and do freshwater stuff now. The motor is alittle overpowered for the boat and it flies in lakes. Do you think I would be able to use this in the back bay area or around the atlantic city inlet/bay area for some fishing? That motor should be strong enuff to get me out a few feet and back right? It is a 5 speed variable motor that in fresh water I rarly go over 1st gear because it dosen't need any more power.

Let me know what you guys think.

Thanks,
Al

 

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Originally posted by Al Jr:
Hey guys, wanted to see what your opinions are on this. I have a 12' fishsing raft (yeah I know haha) and a Minn Kota 30lbs trust trolling motor.

My question is, I take it in lakes and do freshwater stuff now. The motor is alittle overpowered for the boat and it flies in lakes. Do you think I would be able to use this in the back bay area or around the atlantic city inlet/bay area for some fishing? That motor should be strong enuff to get me out a few feet and back right? It is a 5 speed variable motor that in fresh water I rarly go over 1st gear because it dosen't need any more power.

Let me know what you guys think.

Thanks,
Al

Fresh water lakes and moving tidal waters are very different boating conditions. They make electric trolling motors just for saltwater. Check with manufacturers about use of your motor in saltwater as I have been looking into them lately and checking info on them.

Be safe
Mike
 

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Absecon Inlet has very strong currents. I would try your raft out on the other side of the of the AC/Brigatine bridge. I have a Brigatine beach buggy pass and watched a small underpowered and overloaded boat just barely make it back towards where they were coming from. The tide was outgoing and they had no problem (6 guys in a 15' glass bowrider and about a 10 hp outboard and plenty of beer!)heading out with the tide. Coming back aginst the tide was another story. They could barely move and were panicing! They are very lucky they did'nt swamp it trying to manuever against the strong inlet current/tide!

Same goes for all inlets! Longport, Corson's may all look nice and calm a few feet from shore, but a few feet farther the crrent begins to rip and getting swept away in that raft when you get out into the main current would be very, very easy. Best bet is to stay iside and stay away from the inlets!!!!!

I think you'd do fine in the back waters behind the barrier island towns like the ICW. You have a lot less current and could always go cross current and tie up to a sod bank if tides started moving too much for the power you have.

I have had some similar expeience trying to bass fiah in the Deleware River with a small aluminum boat with 10 hp outboard and a 50lb thrust trolling motor. The outboard had enough power to get me to my smallmouth spots above New Hope. The trolling motor could hold me in position for an area I wanted to fish just fine. It was fine manuevering the boat downstream with the electic too. But trying to get back to ramp going against the current with the electic..."forget about it"! If I had to though I could have dragged it back up along the shoreline. Pretty much the same as fishing the back bay waters. Good Luck. Be Safe!

[ 07-06-2005, 03:06 AM: Message edited by: finaddict5 ]
 

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I had the same boat and no motor. all rowing for me. Like you said it's great for the lake. I loved being able to get in and out on lake in a matter of a few minutes (for blowing up boat). I took it to my shore house in Sea Isle City. I loaded it with 3 kids with vests and myself in boat. we were on the bay side near Avalon bridge and we got over to sand bar not too badly..going with tide... Waves and a rubber raft make for a fun ride...LOL

Sand bar is about maybe 100 yrds from dock..
it can be done. But I suggest going with current or across it to a safe outta the current spot.. that boat will fly on the rip currents in and around most of the back bay areas.
Also.. Bring oars good aluminum ones.. not the cheap plastic kind..they's break TRUST ME!! long story... but funny.. just trust me get aluminum ones or Real heavy duty plastic ones..

If you think you have found a spot that looks calm enough to try it in...Wait for the tide to change.. then see what it looks like at it's worst.. it looks all good when the tide is in middle of changing directions .. then Boom next thing you know your 300 yards down from where you started and running low on battery and rowing strength.

Good luck and let us know how you make out if you do try it.

[ 07-06-2005, 05:10 AM: Message edited by: BigdaddyGB ]
 

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Al,

Welcome to the Barn.

In New Jersey, once you motorize your raft, it must be registered. That includes numbers and stickers.

Your setup will be fine for slack tides, but the 30# thrust will not be able to push that raft against a strong inlet current. There are many areas in the back bays where your raft will be fine.

Good luck and don't forget the PFDs.
 

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Originally posted by Al Jr:
[QB] Hey guys, wanted to see what your opinions are on this. I have a 12' fishsing raft (yeah I know haha) and a Minn Kota 30lbs trust trolling motor.
I would suggest you go to a kayak.
 

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I have the same exact raft and trolling motor. You're right, that set-up does fly in ponds. I had a very small trolling motor (20lb, I think) that pushed a good wake from the raft.

In saltwater, though, I'd be very careful. It is nowhere near as aquadynamic as a kayak, so paddling or motoring it against the current would be tough at best. And if the wind kicks up, like it likes to randomly do in large water situations like the bay, you might not be able to get back to the ramp/dock.

I still have my raft in the garage, but I have since "traded it in" for a much sturdier kayak, and now an honest to goodness boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the info guys, I appreciate all the feedback. The boat is rated at 1200lbs and 6 persons, i think that limit is alittle crazy, as are probibly all boat limits, but the most I would ever have on it is 3 persons, ~600 lbs, or 2 persons ~450lbs so hopefully that will help out a bit. I know the back bay area a little bit from offshore fishing but could anyone recommend a good location I could try first to see how it holds up? I really dont need a dock or ramp or anything since it is a raft, just somewhere to walk up to the water that is public. Thanks for any suggestions.

P.S. I think my motor may be designed for freshwater, but as long as I clean the motor and rinse it off well when I'm done is it ok to try it in salt water?

Thanks,
Al
 

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Al, I have used my one man pontoon boat in the back at CISP without a motor. It works great, but you have to go with the tide. As long it's not to w!ndy.




[ 07-06-2005, 06:16 PM: Message edited by: ALL FLUKED UP ]
 

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I may be out of order posting to this...
But a man should know his limits - try a few trips solo or with a competant friend - don't take gear!!
See how you do- if the shizzle hits the fan - be prepared with the proper lifevests and other critical gear for a boater - your in the back you should be able to get to shore - at least by swimming :D
Safety is first and only you can decide at that critical moment
Play the tides/moon/winds in your favor and work from there.
Take this from a guy who owns no boat or raft ... but I've been in barnegat inlet full moon cruisin a'ight in a yak
Test her out see how YOU feel
PS don't call me if you get sucked out to sea


[ 07-09-2005, 12:31 AM: Message edited by: RedAtNight... ]
 

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Stay out of the inlets. Too much water moving too fast! I use my Yak with a motor that flies on lakes but very different on tidal water. You think your moving because of the wake but look at a point of reference on sometimes you are standing still. I thought one night I was going to make it under the Ship's Channel Bridge. Also watch out for rips. They will turn you fast. Remember you are sitting on top of the water and not cutting it. This takes away your stability. Stay in the back water.

[ 07-09-2005, 09:10 AM: Message edited by: Bgsdad ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hey guys, thanks again for all the info. I have a update... I just found a 1956 Evinrude 3hp 2 stroke motor in my dad's garage. I spent the day cleaning it up, replacing the rope, tuneing it up and cleaning the carb. It is in good condition, has compression, turns over, recoils, and kicks. Tomorrow I'll probibly go for the barrel test. If all is good this motor is probibly 10x as strong as my electric. My boat recommends a 2.5hp gas motor, so this will be a bit overpowered, but I think it will work well. Lemme know what you guys think.

Thanks,
Al
 

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If the 3HP runs reliably, it will have enough power to push your raft against an inlet current if you keep the total weight of passengers under 400lbs.
 
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