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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2000 Aquasport 225 Explorer. The boat has a variety of cosmetic issues, some bordering on serious, and I'd like to try to fix most of it myself.

I care more about it being done in such a way that it will hold, and not so much about whether or not it looks brand new.

I know it's real hard to accurately gauge something like this by looking at poor pics, but thank you in advance for your best guess and any suggestions.

First issue: Above the rub rails there are some cracks where the outer coating has chipped away and I can see fiberglass underneath. Doesn't look like a big deal, but I want to fill the hole with something just to try to keep water out and prevent it from further chipping. I believe this is mostly cosmetic.

5200 in the hole? Won't look perfect, but would that inhibit further chipping/peeling?








Second issue: An ugly gouge in the hull above the water line. This is through the gelcoat, through the paint, maybe 1/16 inch deep and you can see fiberglass underneath. The surrounding gelcoat/paint seems unaffected, but I don't want to let this become a problem. It's about the size of 2 quarters side by side.

Matching paint I don't really care about that much. I'm willing to take a "best guess" on the paint and am willing to use anything from real paint to nail polish. The bigger concern is then filling/sealing/sanding the hole.

Any recommendation on a specific type of resin/epoxy to use? And then how to sand it down and buff it out or smooth it out?








3rd issue: This looks ugly and I think it looks a lot uglier than it really is, but it still is really bad looking. The boat scrapes against the front crossmember when loading/launching. I have added a roller to prevent this from happening next season, but the boat needs some sort of repair.

Looking at the area fore and aft of the gouge, the believe the bottom of the hull used to be rounded in this area, but now it is flat for about an inch wide and about 2 feet long.

I have had some suggestions made about using an epoxy that mixes thick and gets applied with a putty knife. Sounds good, and that is the plan as of now.

Sand the whole area down, scuff it all up a little, mix it, put it on, shape it a bit, sand the whole again to smooth it out, then paint it. Sound right?







Again, thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 

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Wow Joey the last pic looks bad. Glass is gone. Marine tex for the other ones but I do not know about the last one. That might need a fiberglass guy on that one.

Good luck
 

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Those look worse then the way you described them to me :eek:

I would probably get the guy you had quoted come out and repair everything. If you want to do it yourself you best bet would be the West Systems stuff like we talked about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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The first two look like you could Marine-Tex or fill them with epoxy. Let it set up a couple days and then hit it with a palm sander till smooth. The last one looks like a fiberglass pro would be required. I'd say that's beyond the expertise of a first time, inexperienced DIYer. Just my thoughts.

That's an awful lot of damage from a trailer crossmember.
 

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Aside from the last one, those others are a pretty easy DIY'er.
I fixed two old screw holes in my transom two years ago and I was shocked how good it came out. I used Formula 27 and some Parker gel coat, came out darn near perfect for my first time ever trying something like that.

Youngs would have that thing looking new again if you wanted to trailer it down there. There is another guy (non-sponsor) in West Creek that did some work for a friend of mine last year and he is mobile. Does nice work.
I could send you his # if you want.
 

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Don't mean to high jack the post but does anyone know a good glass guy in the Camden Co area?

Good Luck with that Joey, I agree the last one you really need to bring someone in to at least look at it and give you advice on fixing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Joey is that really from the trailer and nothing else????
As far as I know. There is black paint on the cross member, in both directions (launching and loading).

It's pretty scary looking. Best I can describe it is that the bottom is VERY smooth. I assume from numerous slow grinds as it's being cranked up/down.

The sides are very rough. It's all chipped away. I guess the bottom coat of epoxy was thick enough that it chipped as it scraped the trailer instead of just grinding away slowly/smoothly. :huh:
 

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As far as I know. There is black paint on the cross member, in both directions (launching and loading).

It's pretty scary looking. Best I can describe it is that the bottom is VERY smooth. I assume from numerous slow grinds as it's being cranked up/down.

The sides are very rough. It's all chipped away. I guess the bottom coat of epoxy was thick enough that it chipped as it scraped the trailer instead of just grinding away slowly/smoothly. :huh:
I am guessing the "bottom coat of epoxy" is the gelcoat layer. It is very brittle when compared to the adjacent fiberglass laminate.

I'd have Dan Young or Scott Brown look at that. Both good glass guys. I've seen trailer cross member damage and it isn't nearly to that degree(unless that is WAY zoomed in and looks worse than it is). Can you pan back and take a more scaled picture?
 

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Marine-tex for the minor ones will work great.
I actually repaired my dads wellcraft with similar trailer damage and it held up for
A season and a half using marine tex. If it wasn't on and off the trailer every other weekend it may have lasted longer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I am guessing the "bottom coat of epoxy" is the gelcoat layer. It is very brittle when compared to the adjacent fiberglass laminate.

I'd have Dan Young or Scott Brown look at that. Both good glass guys. I've seen trailer cross member damage and it isn't nearly to that degree(unless that is WAY zoomed in and looks worse than it is). Can you pan back and take a more scaled picture?
It is way zoomed in. The gelcoat is completely gone and the pink fiberglass mesh you can see is about an inch wide.

What I don't know is if just the gelcoat is gone, or if the fiberglass has been worn flat as well.

I also don't know how long the hull has been like that, as I've only had the boat 1 year. It could have been like that all along and just bottom painted over.

I do have a local guy I'll try first, but if he doesn't have time, then I'll be back here looking for recommendations.
 

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For the voids on topside, grind to solid glass all around and in the void with a dremel and fill with thickened West Systems. West publishes great repair guides (one was free and the other less than 5 bucks) that will tell you everything you need to know about all kinds of repairs. Be aware that epoxy doesn't hold up well when exposed to UV, so you'll need to coat the repair with gel or paint. All epoxies need to be cleaned with water after cured to remove amine blush. Otherwise no finish coat will stick. Use a fairing filler or a mix of fairing and structural to allow easier sanding. Structural fillers alone are not easy to sand fair, and you will most definitely damage the surrounding gelcoat by trying.

As for your bottom, it looks to me like the only fibers exposed are chop mat or gun roving. This layer is typically not structural, but is used only to provide a smooth gelcoat finish. Take a look more closely to determine if you can see any wear into the woven fabric that should reside beneath the chop strand. If the woven is compromised then the repair is much more critical than simply adding chop mat or surfacing putty alone.

Whatever type of fibers that are exposed, they should be re-saturated and sealed to avoid water absorption and more potential damage. Epoxy is the resin of choice for any secondary repair, but be aware that some chop mat is not compatible with epoxy. Chop mat typically is held together with a binder that is only soluble in polyester or vinylester resins. If there are dry chopped fibers exposed I would try to grind back to solid resin or wet out with something other than epoxy.

If damage is truly into structural layers then there is a lot more required for correct repair.

Good luck!
 

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For the voids on topside, grind to solid glass all around and in the void with a dremel and fill with thickened West Systems. West publishes great repair guides (one was free and the other less than 5 bucks) that will tell you everything you need to know about all kinds of repairs. Be aware that epoxy doesn't hold up well when exposed to UV, so you'll need to coat the repair with gel or paint. All epoxies need to be cleaned with water after cured to remove amine blush. Otherwise no finish coat will stick. Use a fairing filler or a mix of fairing and structural to allow easier sanding. Structural fillers alone are not easy to sand fair, and you will most definitely damage the surrounding gelcoat by trying.

As for your bottom, it looks to me like the only fibers exposed are chop mat or gun roving. This layer is typically not structural, but is used only to provide a smooth gelcoat finish. Take a look more closely to determine if you can see any wear into the woven fabric that should reside beneath the chop strand. If the woven is compromised then the repair is much more critical than simply adding chop mat or surfacing putty alone.

Whatever type of fibers that are exposed, they should be re-saturated and sealed to avoid water absorption and more potential damage. Epoxy is the resin of choice for any secondary repair, but be aware that some chop mat is not compatible with epoxy. Chop mat typically is held together with a binder that is only soluble in polyester or vinylester resins. If there are dry chopped fibers exposed I would try to grind back to solid resin or wet out with something other than epoxy.

If damage is truly into structural layers then there is a lot more required for correct repair.

Good luck!
I agree except I think epoxy resin will bind/seal those exposed fibers. Then lay a thin layer of glass cloth over it then sand smooth. Bottom paint.
That top pic looks like an air bubble in the lay up. Chip around it to see how big it is. But all those repairs should be done with epoxy and cabosil. Cabosil will sand the smoothest. Matching that blue will be tough.. Compound that blue before you try matching it.
 

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Joe,

If you have a good or bad experience when you are all finished with whomever, shoot me a private mail and let me know if you have a recommendation, if you are willing....

I had to get sea towed in and my boat ran wrong on the trailer and I had some damage, not like yours, but needs to be addressed. Something I need to handle
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Joe,

If you have a good or bad experience when you are all finished with whomever, shoot me a private mail and let me know if you have a recommendation, if you are willing....

I had to get sea towed in and my boat ran wrong on the trailer and I had some damage, not like yours, but needs to be addressed. Something I need to handle
One way or another I need to address all of this in the next few weeks, so I will let you know.

And if I forget, remind me.
 

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I agree except I think epoxy resin will bind/seal those exposed fibers. Then lay a thin layer of glass cloth over it then sand smooth. Bottom paint.
That top pic looks like an air bubble in the lay up. Chip around it to see how big it is. But all those repairs should be done with epoxy and cabosil. Cabosil will sand the smoothest. Matching that blue will be tough.. Compound that blue before you try matching it.
x2 on most of what our surveyor friend said

lay up bubbles are common in corners and such when the workers get a bit lazy and dont roll the air out of the glass layers. in addition to thickened epoxy, i have had good luck with epoxy putty- very similar to marine tex...but its not pink :D

but i do think a pro would be warranted on that keel! more importantly, fix whatever is causing it! my keel rubbed occationally on my crossmemebers, and i scraped off some gel coat. i put a bunch of extra keel rollers- no problems now. i then got my bottom fixed. by a pro since its not bottom painted. (bottom paint hides alot)
 

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did this happen while u owned boat? just askin. my thoughts through experiance maybe b this. this is just a thought. maybe whomever owned boat had a roller fall off the arm that holds it and washer and arm did that damage. maybe guys were drinking a little much and just winched it on not knowing how to fix before loading boat or didnt notice. just an opinion. i had a roller come off in the back and it scrapped the crap out of bottom. didnt notice till i got hom which did more damage bouncing around. and this happened twice but caught second time and smashed washer down and rapped arm in 3 t shirts to protect bottom.jmo but that what it looks like kinda.
 
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