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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok gang, this thread is not about whether I should or should not tie or fish this pattern, but more a question surrounding how to tie it.

what type of feathers should I choose/look for and what is "beard style" or any other tips for tying it.

I've tried a couple (pics later) and am not satisfied at all!

Skok's Pheasant Phlounder


Hook: #2 Tiemco 811S or 800S


Thread: 3/0 Monocord, brown or tan


Eyes: small or medium lead dumbbell eyes, tied in 1/3 of the way back from the hook eye


1st Wing: cream or tan coyote guard hairs from the belly or tail, pushed down to have a flattened appearance


1st Collar: two mottled grayish-blue pheasant feathers followed by a 3rd pheasant feather of a brownish coloration, the 1st being the smallest of the 3 feathers, tied in back of the lead eyes and wrapped – the fibers should be gathered and tied in a “beard” style so that all the fibers are on the hook point side of the shank


2nd Wing: brown or tan coyote guard hairs from the belly or tail, pushed down to have a flattened appearance


2nd Collar: a brown marabou-like pheasant feather, followed by a smaller golden-brown pheasant feather, tied in front of the lead eyes and wrapped – the fibers should be gathered and tied in a “beard” style so that all the fibers are on the hook point side of the shank


Note: Any pheasant feather or other plumage (including feathers from grouse, dyed partridges or roosters or hens) may be used so long as they are reflective of the natural coloration of a juvenile flatfish.

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any and and all help is much appreciated!
 

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Guard hairs are the long stiff hairs not the soft fluff between the hairs. You'd cut the hairs close to the skin, hold on to the tips and pull the soft underfur away.

beard style, think goatee style hair on your face. Small clump of hair.

marabou style feather, it's a feather similar to the soft marabou feather but of a different bird with the same look of that feather.
 

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Hope this helps & comes through. I did not do this. Found & copied. Looks very good to me.

Pheasant Phlounder







Hook: #2 Tiemco 811S or 800S
Thread: 3/0 Monocord, brown or tan
Eyes: small or medium lead dumbbell eyes, tied in 1/3 of the way back from the hook eye
1[SUP]st[/SUP] Wing: cream or tan coyote guard hairs from the belly or tail, pushed down to have a flattened appearance
1[SUP]st[/SUP] Collar: two mottled grayish-blue pheasant feathers followed by a 3[SUP]rd[/SUP] pheasant feather of a brownish coloration, the 1[SUP]st[/SUP] being the smallest of the 3 feathers, tied in back of the lead eyes and wrapped – the fibers should be gathered and tied in a “beard” style so that all the fibers are on the hook point side of the shank
2[SUP]nd[/SUP] Wing: brown or tan coyote guard hairs from the belly or tail, pushed down to have a flattened appearance
2[SUP]nd[/SUP] Collar: a brown marabou-like pheasant feather, followed by a smaller golden-brown pheasant feather, tied in front of the lead eyes and wrapped – the fibers should be gathered and tied in a “beard” style so that all the fibers are on the hook point side of the shank
Note: Any pheasant feather or other plumage (including feathers from a hen pheasant, grouse, dyed partridges or roosters or hens) may be used so long as they are reflective of the natural coloration of a juvenile flatfish.
[HR][/HR]Step 1Using brown or tan 3/0 Monocord and a #4 – #1 standard shank hook, tie in a set of small or medium dumbbell eyes with figure-eight wraps, two eye lengths back from the hook eye.
Step 2Tie in a bunch of tan or cream coyote tail or grey fox tail guard hairs as long as twice the hook length or slightly longer on the hook point side of the shank, two eye lengths in back of the lead eyes. Guard hairs with dark tips are acceptable. Tie the guard hairs in with two or three loose wraps and then flatten the fibers down with thumb pressure. Trim the butts and continue to bind the guard hairs down with at least 6 tight turns.
Step 3Attach the first of three pheasant body feathers at the coyote hair tie-in point. Wrap the feather forward (you will only get two or three turns out of the feather due to its small size) and tie down. Form a beard by grabbing the pheasant fibers and pulling them down under (hook point side) the hook shank and tying them down. Flatten the fibers with thumb pressure and secure the fibers in place. Trim out any fibers that would not swing around to the hook point side of the shank. Repeat (3 or so feathers) with increasingly larger feathers until you are tight to the lead eyes.
Step 4Tie in another bunch of tan or cream coyote tail or grey fox tail guard hairs on the hook point side of the shank directly in front of the lead eyes. The hair should only go to the length of the bend or slightly beyond. Again, tie the guard hairs in with two or three loose wraps and then flatten the fibers down with thumb pressure. Trim the butts and continue to bind the guard hairs down with at least 6 tight turns making sure that you don’t build any thread bulk near the hook eye.
Step 5Attach the first of two pheasant body feathers at the coyote hair tie-in point. The first feather should be slightly larger than the other feathers you have selected and should have a marabou-like quality of fluff on the first thin section of stem. Wrap the feather forward (you will only get three or four turns out of the feather due to its small size) and tie down. Form a beard by grabbing the pheasant fibers and pulling them down under (hook point side) the hook shank and tying them down. Flatten the fibers with thumb pressure and secure the fibers in place. Trim out any fibers that would not swing around to the hook point side of the shank. Repeat with a smaller, less fluffy feather until you are tight to the hook eye.
Step 6Whip finish and apply head cement to the entire bottom portion of the flounder (lead eyes, exposed feather stems and head).BACK to F
 

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But wait, there's more=

Size: 2
Heavy or Light
From Dave: I’ve finally figured a way to tie the Pheasant Phlounder quickly: delete the pheasant! These little flatfish are spun up with coyote tail guard hairs and grizzly hen back feathers (dyed tan) and are dead ringers for one of the striped bass’ favorite little delicacies. Tied either on a #2 Tiemco 800S with a medium size lead dumbbell eye to get down and dirty fast, or a #2 Tiemco 811S, with small lead eyes, for skinny water “skitterfish”. Also a good bonefish / permit fly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks, guys.

I'll post up my pics / attempts at some point and perhaps you can give some constructive feedback based on my feeble attempts :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Sparse,

Parts of this still don't make much sense to me (given the picture for example):

- Tie in a bunch of tan or cream coyote tail or grey fox tail guard hairs as long as twice the hook length or slightly longer on the hook point side of the shank, two eye lengths in back of the lead eyes. Guard hairs with dark tips are acceptable. Tie the guard hairs in with two or three loose wraps and then flatten the fibers down with thumb pressure. Trim the butts and continue to bind the guard hairs down with at least 6 tight turns.

Q: what am I actually doing here (the bold above)? I mean, I get a bunch of coyote tail, snip, pick out under fur, lay it on the hook side of the shank,
2 or 3 loose wraps.

all good.

What is happening with the thumb pressure/flattening? just squeezing it into 2 clumps on either side of the shank to give a little more split around the bend
of the hook? Or am I expecting as I tighten this for the hair to flair like bucktail (which I don't see happening with coyote guard hair), then flattening this down
and back?


to highlight my question: look at the "quick" tie picture... near the eye, looks like the hair is flaired around??
so, am I, in effect, "spinning" the hair and then pulling it all to one side of the hook?

that's what I don't get (that, and a few other things)
 

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Rob, the loose wraps are used to lightly hold the material and give you the ability to manipulate materials without them falling out. Once you have have them where you like them you'd increase pressure on the thread and wrap tighter the next few times to secure them.

The hair and it's look at the hook isn't a spinning effect. The hair will flare up a bit because of the amount of material behind it. As you bring the final wraps of thread closer to the existing material it digs in and the material pops up a bit too.
 

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Good question & answers. As I stated, this is not my tie or instructions. Pure plagiarism.
 

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I don't post much but saw this thread and wanted to show 2 flounder flies I tied. They were both tied with kinky fiber, then shaped.
The one with 2 eyes, I just applied a mallard flank feather on the top of the kinky fiber body.
I found these pretty easy to tie. I saw this pattern tied by Steve Farrar some where on the web but can't remember where.

Insect Organism Lymantria dispar dispar Invertebrate Moths and butterflies

Porcupine fishes Fish Fish Blowfish Organism

The positive thing with these was there isn't many materials needed.
 

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I don't post much but saw this thread and wanted to show 2 flounder flies I tied. They were both tied with kinky fiber, then shaped.
The one with 2 eyes, I just applied a mallard flank feather on the top of the kinky fiber body.
I found these pretty easy to tie. I saw this pattern tied by Steve Farrar some where on the web but can't remember where.

View attachment 124634

View attachment 124642

The positive thing with these was there isn't many materials needed.

Charlie. I really like that flounder done with the kinky fiber. If you don't mind I saved the picture and will in the future be making a copy of it.

That even looks great to fish with a sinking line for seabass. Slow twitch retrieve.
 

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Both flies look like they will catch, as every saltwater fish eats anything that is small enough to get into their mouth, including fluke eating their own young. Have cleaned many fluke with small fluke in the bellies. Interesting to see different flies that people use or like to tie. I am sure they will catch as I believe if you put a fly in front of a fish and it looks alive they will eat it up, no matter what pattern, especially stripers as they are the seagulls of the ocean they pretty much eat anything. Will be interesting to see how they turn out and catch. Keep us up to date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
well this is about the best I can tie Skok's version. Not real happy but, eh, it was worth a try.

Also a pic of some with squirrel tail and a couple of bucktail deceivers





nothing pretty but perhaps can fool a fish... maybe :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
btw (not that anytbody cares) but it seems I need to use a lot more coyote tail to fill out the "Phlounder"

also fyi that red bucktail deceiver actually has a long white tail that didnt show up in the pic... its not as ugly in person :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'll keep this alive for a little while longer.

I received a response from Dave Skok with some suggestions on how to fix my tie. First thing I need to do is get some better feathers, which I just ordered.

When they come in, I'll share more about his tips... AFTER I successfully apply them :D
 

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The more you tie the better you get at it. Try and save some of your first flies that you have tied, if the fish don't chew them all up. It is fun to see where you started. As long as your fly looks alive in the water it doesn't matter that your fly is not perfect. You will find after catching a few fish on a perfect looking fly that it will start to get pretty messed up and look like an ugly tie, but it will still keep catching. Don't be afraid to use those first ties. You will catch on them.
 
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