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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am board today. Here it is.

Why do most boats have the steering wheel on the right side of the boats and Car have it on the left side?

CC are not the boats I am talking about.
 

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The Rules of the Road (COLREGS) require all vessels to keep to starboard (the right) when negotiating narrow channels and entrances. Having the steering position on the right-hand side allows for better visibility for judgement of clearances.

2.)Most skippers prefer to take advantage of the "paddle wheel effect" of right-turning propellers and come alongside "starboard side to" (right side against the quay).Therefore the wheel is placed on the right for better visibility of the (hard)quay/other vessel when the skipper is busy with the hazardous manoeuvre of coming alongside.

Most engines are traditionally manufactured to turn clock-wise (to the right) when viewed from aft. The propeller is therefore right-turning and this causes a sideways force to the right (called transverse thrust) which helps the bring the boat over to the right.

Tranverse thrust is also known as "prop walk" or "the paddle wheel effect" because the twist in the prop blades means they are scooping water to some extent from the right. On twin -screw boats they sometimes try to eliminate prop walk by using counter-rotating propellers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Googles answer:

The origin of term comes from old boating practices. Before boats had rudders on their centerline, boats were steered by use of a specialized oar. This oar was held by a sailor located towards the stern (back) of the boat. However, like most of the rest of society, there were many more right-handed sailors than left-handed sailors. This meant that the right-handed sailors holding the steering oar (which had been broadened to provide better control) used to stand on the right side of the boat. The word starboard is a corruption of steering board, which in turn came from the old Norse language word st�ri, in the language of the vikings.

Similarly, the term for the left side of the boat, port, is derived from the practice of sailors mooring on the left side (i.e., the Portboard side) as to prevent the steering boards from being crushed. Because the words portboard and starboard sounded too similar to be distingued under windy sailing conditions, portboard was shortened to port.

The starboad side of most naval vessels the world over is designated the 'senior' side. The officers' gangway or sea ladder is shipped on this side and this side of the quarterdeck is reserved for the captain. The flag or pennant of the ship's captain or senior officer in command is generally hoist on the starboard yard.

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Port was also called larboard, from ladebord: the side the ship is laden or takes cargo on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have seen some Italian boats with the wheels on the port side :huh:
Some lobster boat have the wheel on the left side. That is why I asked the question.

Boy I am board:wave:
 

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My boat, a 1985 21' CaboMarine Cuddycon, has the steering wheel on the port side. It also has a 1999 counter-rotating 200 HP Evinrude Ficht hanging on off the back. Love my boat!
 

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The Rules of the Road (COLREGS) require all vessels to keep to starboard (the right) when negotiating narrow channels and entrances. Having the steering position on the right-hand side allows for better visibility for judgement of clearances.

2.)Most skippers prefer to take advantage of the "paddle wheel effect" of right-turning propellers and come alongside "starboard side to" (right side against the quay).Therefore the wheel is placed on the right for better visibility of the (hard)quay/other vessel when the skipper is busy with the hazardous manoeuvre of coming alongside.

Most engines are traditionally manufactured to turn clock-wise (to the right) when viewed from aft. The propeller is therefore right-turning and this causes a sideways force to the right (called transverse thrust) which helps the bring the boat over to the right.

Tranverse thrust is also known as "prop walk" or "the paddle wheel effect" because the twist in the prop blades means they are scooping water to some extent from the right. On twin -screw boats they sometimes try to eliminate prop walk by using counter-rotating propellers.
Actually you want to dock port side to (in most situations) with a standard right hand propeller...that's because you are looking for the paddle wheel effect when putting the boat in reverse when approaching the dock.

Prop walk can be used in either situation...but I would say more commonly used to dock port side to when coming in at an angle then backing to slow and swing the stern in.

here's a passage from the following link....

Docking to a Pier: In a low wind situation it is often easier to dock to a pier on the port side if your sailboat has a right-hand prop and to the starboard side if your sailboat has a left-hand prop. When reverse is applied, this will allow the prop walk to swing the stern of the boat toward the pier . (Note: In sailing ships of long ago, the right side of the sailboat had a steering board instead of a rudder. This side came to be called starboard. The left side was always used to approach the port and thus came to be called port. )

http://www.cruising.sailingcourse.com/docking.htm
 

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"Most engines are traditionally manufactured to turn clock-wise (to the right) when viewed from aft." phish4fun

Most if not all are Left Hand (Counter Clockwise Rotation) when viewed from aft. This is the standard rotation for Single engine and Port engine (most)twin installs. Now with the transmissions that are full power fwd or reverse, twin engine installs have both engines left hand and the starboard transmission is set to turn opposite rotation.
 
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