BASS BARN banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help Identify Horseshoe Crab Spawning Habitat
April 29, 2005
The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection?s Division of Fish and Wildlife is encouraging the general public to assist in identifying horseshoe crab spawning habitat throughout the state this spring. Collecting information on potential spawning habitat is the result of an Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) Fishery Management Plan for Horseshoe Crabs adopted in 1998 and is required of all coastal states from Maine to Florida.

While many Delaware Bay beaches and some Atlantic coastal bay beaches are known to support horseshoe crab spawning from year to year, the Division would appreciate current, personal observations from individuals on current sites of spawning activity.

The horseshoe crab spawning season in the mid-Atlantic area usually occurs during May and June when large numbers of horseshoe crabs move onto sandy beaches to mate and lay eggs. Spawning habitat generally includes sandy beach areas within bays and coves that are protected from significant wave action. Male and female horseshoe crabs are coupled during mating and egg laying.

During the May and June horseshoe crab spawning season, migratory shorebirds, especially the red knot, are likely to be present on the beaches feeding on horseshoe crab eggs to replenish their body weight and continue the migration to their arctic breeding grounds. Under no circumstances should survey participants disturb any feeding shorebirds while making their horseshoe crab spawning observations. This is a critical feeding period for migratory shorebirds, especially on the Delaware Bay beaches.

This spring, persons interested in reporting horseshoe crab spawning activity should be alert to the dates of new and full moons: May 8 - new moon, May 23 - full moon, June 6 - new moon and June 22 - full moon. For a few days before to a few days after each of these four dates, horseshoe crab spawning activity is likely to be at its peak intensity.

Individuals may report their observations on horseshoe crab spawning activity by visiting the Division?s Web site and accessing the "Horseshoe Crab Spawning Habitat Identification Form," or by calling the toll free phone number 1-866-NJ-CATCH (1-866-652-2824). When calling, be sure to leave your name and telephone number so that someone can contact you to record your information.

All information received over the next few months will be analyzed, summarized, mapped and reported to the ASMFC and state regulatory agencies so that this critical habitat may be protected.

Horseshoe Crab Spawning Habitat Identification Form

[ 04-29-2005, 11:27 AM: Message edited by: NIGHTSTRIKES ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Yea good idea, tell them where the crabs are at, then they will tell you that you do not belong there,because of the crabs.If we started hunting gulls i guarantee the red knot population would re-bound,there population is declining not because of to few crabs, but to much competition from the gulls fore the eggs they feed on.Next time you see crabs on the beach count how many gulls compared to the number of shorebirds and you will understand what I am saying.You should probably send your info directly to the Audubon Society because they are the ones pushing for this. if you help them you may one day regret it because if they had it there way you will not be allowed on the beaches of Deleware bay in the spring time so that the gulls can gorge themselves on the horseshoe crab eggs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
i always thought the same thing, fred. i believe the gulls alone are more of a menace to the population than any waterman could be. you can always tell when the crabs are here when all you here is thousands of laughing gulls screaming so loud that you cant hear yourself think! i'm not the first one to say this, but i wish there were a season on them damn things!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,058 Posts
Originally posted by Fred81876:
Yea good idea, tell them where the crabs are at, then they will tell you that you do not belong there,because of the crabs.If we started hunting gulls i guarantee the red knot population would re-bound,there population is declining not because of to few crabs, but to much competition from the gulls fore the eggs they feed on.Next time you see crabs on the beach count how many gulls compared to the number of shorebirds and you will understand what I am saying.You should probably send your info directly to the Audubon Society because they are the ones pushing for this. if you help them you may one day regret it because if they had it there way you will not be allowed on the beaches of Deleware bay in the spring time so that the gulls can gorge themselves on the horseshoe crab eggs.
Couldn't agree more.
:D :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,690 Posts
Originally posted by Fred81876:
Yea good idea, tell them where the crabs are at, then they will tell you that you do not belong there,because of the crabs.If we started hunting gulls i guarantee the red knot population would re-bound,there population is declining not because of to few crabs, but to much competition from the gulls fore the eggs they feed on.Next time you see crabs on the beach count how many gulls compared to the number of shorebirds and you will understand what I am saying.You should probably send your info directly to the Audubon Society because they are the ones pushing for this. if you help them you may one day regret it because if they had it there way you will not be allowed on the beaches of Deleware bay in the spring time so that the gulls can gorge themselves on the horseshoe crab eggs.
You are right, it is crazy. In May I am not even permitted to walk in front of my own house on the Delaware Bay, can't fish, kayak, walk the dog, or even take a walk. Last year I was followed back a half mile by two guys with handcuffs saying I couldn't walk on the bay because I might make the birds waste extra energy by flying away. Usually they don't even move they are too busy eating, the gulls are the noisy ones that makes the red knots fly away. In a week or so there will be a rope at the end of my street not letting any humans on the beach :mad: , only gulls.

[ 04-30-2005, 08:56 AM: Message edited by: Stalker Charters ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
570 Posts
i'd be pissed too stalker if i had to put up with that! i remember as a kid we used to pick 'em off reeds beach and no one gave two chits. nowadays they'll lock ya up for just walkin on it! :mad:
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top