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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
than k you for that great article on the wooden minnow box. Ii was always wondering why my father and grandfather prefer that bucket to my brandnew bucket with the swing lid.

From reading on that subject I saw that many of you dont use minnows as bait very often. If not minnows waht are you using. thanks
 

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For FLUKE....Bucktails tipped with bacon ;) ...Or herring,mackerel,squid or anyother kind of striped bait :D
 

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Bucktail tipped with shedder crab,or herring strip for fluke.Bucktail tipped with small peanut bunker got the job done on wk.fish last year.I don't use shedder after mid july too many small sea bass in bay.
 

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in the back i usually have minnows with me but i always have some kind of strip bait, whether it be herring and mackeral early in the season or squid, sea robin or doggie. that's the best part about "trash" fish if they're to ugly to eat use em for bait. i sually drift with two rods one with a bucktail tipped with a nice strip of whatever and the other with a three way rig a log leader and a minnow. and if one is clearly outperforming the other usually the bucktail, i'll switch the other rig.
 

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FROM Early April until Early June all I used were 1/4 oz white or chratreuse bucktails with small pc of fresh herring
the peice was 1 1/4" long and 1/2" wide
Produce bigger fish more consitently during that time than any other combination
 

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Make sure you give bunker a try on them bucks.
Had great luck with a pink buctail tipped with a fresh strip of bunker.

Also, surprisingly did real well with a hi-minnow rig this year.
 

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I do the 1/4oz bucktail with herring early in the season. I also use 1/8 oz when I can get away with it. It's a big fluke magnet.
 

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I use a white bucktail and have 1/8 - 2 ounce assortment to choose from.

If the bite is on then it's the 2 ouncer. If they are just messing around then I go to the 1/8.

My favorite bait is salted herring strips. I cut them with a scissors because a knife tends to tear away too many scales.

I tried other strip baits but nothing seems to work as well for me as the herring. Big scales reflect a lot of light.

Another favorite is a nice big minnow. One problem I always had with minnows is the hole the bucktail left in their mouth. From constantly jigging the bucktail the hole made by the hook will grow in size. First time a flounder hits and the minnow could bounce right off. My fix was to take a pack of white plastic worms and cut them into small pieces. I put the minnow on the bucktail then slip on a piece of the worm to act as a stopper. No matter how big the hole in the minnow gets it cant be bounced off the hook.

I have tried just about every strip bait you can think of and I stay with the herring. When salted it is very firm and I just love those big scales.

When fishing bucktails for flounder remember this. Most flounder move in and inhale the jig. The gills open along with the mouth and the bait and most likely the hook is in it's mouth. Now it may sit there for a short time holding it. The jig head may still be sticking out of it's mouth. This is where I set the hook. It's about four seconds after I feel the bite.

I have to say that about 90% of my flounder are hooked in the corner of their mouth. Last year I didn't have one gut hooked flounder on a bucktail.

By letting them go too long you can run into two problems. First is that they can still get the bait off the jig. The longer they have it the better the chance that they can remove it. Then you just pull in an empty bucktail.
Second. If you set the hook when the entire jig is in the flounders mouth you may never actually set it. The flounder holds it's mouth shut tight. You try to slam the hook home. All that may happen is the head of the jig may be pulled to it's teeth but the point doesn't penetrate.

Try it sometime. Take a bucktail and hold it with the hook against your finger. If it's sharp you can see where just a slight tug could break the skin. Now take the bucktail and hold it in your hand while tightly gripping it by the line ahead of the lead head. Pull hard and all you feel is the head against your grip. The hook point is doing nothing.

Now picture a flounder with it's mouth closed over the jig head. It will stay on only as long as it keeps it's mouth shut. If it opens it's mouth there is a good chance that the jig will just pop out. You just need to give it enough time to get the hook point into is mouth.

If I miss a few fish on the count of four I figure it's because they are more into an attack mode and not realy feeding. By moving to a smaller bucktail I reduce my missed fish. Sometimes flounder grab things from reaction rather than hunger. If they ain't serious about eating then we ain't seriously catching.

My best rig for producing flounder is the good old hook and minnow. I can outfish the bucktail in numbers but not in size. I keep it as simple as I can and tie my own. I take a four foot piece of MONO leader and tie a dropper loop near one end. At the short end I tie a basic loop for my weight. The other ends gets a 4/0 gold plated hook and depending on how I feel I may slide a white bead on the leader before I tie the hook.

This rig is so simple to use and very effective. If you are on a crowded boat or trying to manage a few kids then this is as easy as it gets. A minnow and a weight and you are good to go.

Unless a trip was a last minute deal I will always take herring and minnows for bait. It's always good to have more bait than less. :D
 

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Backbays around OC most effective lure was a 1/4 to 1/2oz.jighead with motor oil B2 Squid tipped with SPEARING. That worked great except we used a bunch of bgs of those little frozen spearing. They were fluke candy!
In deeper water ocean or Del. Bay my favorite rig consisted of a 4/0 Gammi tied to 36" of FLOURO. Just above the Gammi is a small chartreuse bead then a clevis to hold a small chartreuse spinner blade with another small bead on top of that. Put a chartreuse squid skirt on the Gammi. Use a swivel and fish finder and as light a sinker as possible and there you have the most deadly fluke rig I have ever used. For bait I like the old squid/minnow combo or either bait by themselves depending on what they want. Spearing or mackeral also works great too. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
how do you hold bottom with a 1/8 bucktail? seems to be that tail would just be flying with the current
 

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Minnows are fine for the back bay fluke as minnows are part of the menu there. With the big boat, most of my fluking now is relegated to the deep water. Offshore fluke are usually feeding on larger baits, so LARGE strip baits are in order here, on a skirted fluke rig, spinner, etc.. someting to add to the profile of the bait and create some flash is best with a good drift, or when trolling forward. 2 hook rigs work good as long as the bait doesn't spin. Strip baits work great on a bucktail with calm days when sitting still over structure and jigging. Doubleing up strip baits or splitting the tails adds to their action. If you want to spice up strip baits in the ocean you will find that fresh frozen spearing and sandeels will outproduce minnows on a good drift or trolling. If sitting still, or drifting slowly a live bait usually works best, but for the Ocean on a slow day rather than a minnow i'd like some live snappers, squid, tinkers, sardines, butters, peanuts and even bergals fished naturally on a rig w/ no hardware. However, catching these baits and keeping them alive is another challenge alltogether. So, I find it best to just imitate these live baitfish with a bucktail or skirted rig dressed with fresh strip baits and to entice the fish into beleiving it's the real thing by jigging which i do both when I'm bucktailing over fish holding tight to structure and drifting or trolling scattered structure with conventional fluke rigs.

[ 02-05-2004, 04:39 PM: Message edited by: CaptG ]
 

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Hey Verse.

I can get away with light bucktais because I run my motor to slow the boat down.

I want to keep my jig vertical. The only way I can do that is to bring the boat to a dead crawl.

I can use very light bucktails and tackle plus it keeps the bait in front of the flounder longer so you get the fish that aren't real active.

I don't think I have drifted with the tide in about sex years. :D :D
 

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Early in the season there are a lot of bluefish in the back waters.
A strip of fresh blue is also a producer.
Plan on bringing mackeral or herring along with the minnows. If you get a blue try some super fresh bait.

As far as using light bucktails.
I use 1/4 and 1/2 oz. The smaller the better.
Generally if its a tight area like Ludlums Bay I only fish there with other serious fisherpeople.
No kids since the drifts are so short.
But if you set you drift drop down right away and find the bottom you should be fine. Outside the channel in Ludlums is very shallow so the bottom is easy to find. As you drift keep the engine on and occasionally put it gear to slow down.
You'll be letting out line as you drift to deeper water. The light bucktail doesn't really sink to the bottom its more of staying on the bottom.
I big minnow helps since its got more weight.
Braided line also helps.

Good Luck
 

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my personal best was in back using a 2 oz bucktail "eyes" with a half a strip of mackeral 8lb fluke slammed it!!! ronbo was there too
 
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