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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking about taking a run out of GE inlet on Sunday looking for Mahi. Would the AC ridge be a good place to start. I have never went for Mahi but really want to learn this year.
 

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I usually don't find Dolphin until you're out in the cleaner blue water 馃挦 and that's Prolly near 30 miles off the Coast. Think of the Pelagic fish as a race car... They can't handle inhaling the dirty green water. They need the clear blue for their performance engines. Once you get a color change to the water look for anything floating on top of the water... Anything including the weed lines, they hide and congregate under the shadows. Even a plastic bag or a piece of lumber, they'll be under it if they're around.

Cast a Deadly Dick towards the flotsam and see what hits. If they're there try a big minnow. Once you hook your 1st Dolphin, reel it close to the Boat BUT, don't reel it in... Leave him behind the boat and use every rod you have to catch the rest 馃ぃ. Bring the whole School to the Cooler 馃槑

Also if you can look at the Temperature charts and see where the warm water Eddie's are that come closest to you, that's where the blue water is. Temp charts can be found on NOAA and a couple other places to get you in the right neighborhood for Blue water, whenever you see the eddy (like a river of warm water branching off of the Gulfstream) coming towards the beach, that's the closest you'll find your target fish 馃悹. It moves so 1st look for the color change in the water 馃挦 then watch your temperature changes on your fishfinder, then look for signs of life above and below the surface. Then you also have to be ready for Trigger's, Tuna, Wahoo and the rest of the Pelagic crowd.
 

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last year i saw Mahi around the pots Rutgers has on LE reef- Usually i see them right around the time fluke season closes. All small - did not see any over 3 or 4lb. Gotta have the warm clear water around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I usually don't find Dolphin until you're out in the cleaner blue water 馃挦 and that's Prolly near 30 miles off the Coast. Think of the Pelagic fish as a race car... They can't handle inhaling the dirty green water. They need the clear blue for their performance engines. Once you get a color change to the water look for anything floating on top of the water... Anything including the weed lines, they hide and congregate under the shadows. Even a plastic bag or a piece of lumber, they'll be under it if they're around.

Cast a Deadly Dick towards the flotsam and see what hits. If they're there try a big minnow. Once you hook your 1st Dolphin, reel it close to the Boat BUT, don't reel it in... Leave him behind the boat and use every rod you have to catch the rest 馃ぃ. Bring the whole School to the Cooler 馃槑

Also if you can look at the Temperature charts and see where the warm water Eddie's are that come closest to you, that's where the blue water is. Temp charts can be found on NOAA and a couple other places to get you in the right neighborhood for Blue water, whenever you see the eddy (like a river of warm water branching off of the Gulfstream) coming towards the beach, that's the closest you'll find your target fish 馃悹. It moves so 1st look for the color change in the water 馃挦 then watch your temperature changes on your fishfinder, then look for signs of life above and below the surface. Then you also have to be ready for Trigger's, Tuna, Wahoo and the rest of the Pelagic crowd.
Thanks so much! This is new to me so I guess it鈥檚 a give it a try thing and learn from each experience! Last year we found a lot of trigger fish near the 3 mile mark around pots so I hope to find more out farther. ocean has to cooperate for me to go Sunday but I do plan on taking Aug 27-30th off so maybe I will get some slick calm days during that period. Again thanks for the help
 

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Apart from getting lucky on a stray mahi, I think the ticket is to get out early on those inshore pots, once the sun comes up and boats start going by it seems they go down deep and stop feeding. Inshore pots seem to have a more limited window compared to the canyons
 

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we may me heading out sat for something-pushing out a bit from TI Reefo_O
 

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Don't forget to bring a pint or quart of killies. They are like crack to the mahi, trust me. Mahi are rather smart and can change preferences for certain baits, particularly when they notice their brothers and sisters are going missing from being caught. Throw the deadly dick out there first and catch a few, once they lose interest, throw a handful of small chunks at the pot and a hooked chunk in the mix. When they lose interest in that, move to another type of lure. Lastly, throw the killies. You can even throw a handful of killies at the pot and watch the water boil and a handful off the side of the boat. The killies will congregate under the boat due to the shadow it casts for safety. The mahi will now rush the boat to get em' underneath. This works great when you have a mahi hooked and swimming next to the boat to attract the others. The killies will just add to the attraction. Utter chaos at times. Enjoy your fish tacos at the end of the day. Oh, keep your eyes peeled for cobia as you approach the pots or buoys. They cruise the surface like a destroyer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Don't forget to bring a pint or quart of killies. They are like crack to the mahi, trust me. Mahi are rather smart and can change preferences for certain baits, particularly when they notice their brothers and sisters are going missing from being caught. Throw the deadly dick out there first and catch a few, once they lose interest, throw a handful of small chunks at the pot and a hooked chunk in the mix. When they lose interest in that, move to another type of lure. Lastly, throw the killies. You can even throw a handful of killies at the pot and watch the water boil and a handful off the side of the boat. The killies will congregate under the boat due to the shadow it casts for safety. The mahi will now rush the boat to get em' underneath. This works great when you have a mahi hooked and swimming next to the boat to attract the others. The killies will just add to the attraction. Utter chaos at times. Enjoy your fish tacos at the end of the day. Oh, keep your eyes peeled for cobia as you approach the pots or buoys. They cruise the surface like a destroyer.
Thanks so much! Probably going to push sundays trip back a week now. Weather is so so and I do t want to make the trip only to turn around in rough water. I鈥檓 pretty cautious but I鈥檒l post as soon as I get out. Like I said before I already have the 27-30th off so hopefully weather permits me to go out those dates. I might make it down next weekend if all looks good. Thanks to all of you and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Finally got out this weekend. We had a blast at the cigar. Caught a nice catch of Mahi and really just had a lot of fun hanging with some friends. Not sure I鈥檒l make it down Again this year but I鈥檒l certainly try. Thanks for the advice!

good luck to all.
 

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I usually don't find Dolphin until you're out in the cleaner blue water 馃挦 and that's Prolly near 30 miles off the Coast. Think of the Pelagic fish as a race car... They can't handle inhaling the dirty green water. They need the clear blue for their performance engines. Once you get a color change to the water look for anything floating on top of the water... Anything including the weed lines, they hide and congregate under the shadows. Even a plastic bag or a piece of lumber, they'll be under it if they're around.

Cast a Deadly Dick towards the flotsam and see what hits. If they're there try a big minnow. Once you hook your 1st Dolphin, reel it close to the Boat BUT, don't reel it in... Leave him behind the boat and use every rod you have to catch the rest 馃ぃ. Bring the whole School to the Cooler 馃槑

Also if you can look at the Temperature charts and see where the warm water Eddie's are that come closest to you, that's where the blue water is. Temp charts can be found on NOAA and a couple other places to get you in the right neighborhood for Blue water, whenever you see the eddy (like a river of warm water branching off of the Gulfstream) coming towards the beach, that's the closest you'll find your target fish 馃悹. It moves so 1st look for the color change in the water 馃挦 then watch your temperature changes on your fishfinder, then look for signs of life above and below the surface. Then you also have to be ready for Trigger's, Tuna, Wahoo and the rest of the Pelagic crowd.
i caught a blue marlin On the fourth of july a bunch of years ago in nasty looking green water at the trunk.
 

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One year most of the ocean city white marlin invitational boats were on the 30 line where we were bft fishing. We had at least a dozen in our spread that day and hooked 3 or 4 w/ are bft spread. The boats that went way deep (1000 line) chasing warm water only caught a few each. Ya never know
 

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Not sure it meets the inshore criteria on here, but we trolled the 30 line out of LEI on Tuesday looking for tuna and came home with Mahi. No complaints.
 
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