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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see some reports where the fish still were full of roe. Are there any telltale signs of this? I would rather release them if I could reasonably tell.
 

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Most of the time, you can see their belly swollen with eggs. If they are slim, they are spawned out
 

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and even if a male, so what? the females are the most important to release

LOL on the cig and martini line... first thing that came to my mind when reading the title :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If it bites on pickles and ice cream, I'll throw the preggo back
 

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No way to really know 100% unless you open the fish up. It just doesnt shrink right back up...
 

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A spawned out female will often have some bruising under the tail up to the abdomen where she has used it to build the nest. That is not 100%, but is generally pretty accurate if you see it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I caught four 50"+ cows on pickles, the ice cream just didn't stay on the hook. Of course I threw them back in ... forgot to take pics, can't believe it!
 

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A spawned out female will often have some bruising under the tail up to the abdomen where she has used it to build the nest. That is not 100%, but is generally pretty accurate if you see it.
Are you talking about a striper? If so, them building a nest is a completely new way of spawning. Spawning happens on the surface of the water with the males ramming in to the females and pushing the eggs out of her
 

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A spawned out female will often have some bruising under the tail up to the abdomen where she has used it to build the nest. That is not 100%, but is generally pretty accurate if you see it.
?????????????????
Striped Bass spawn in water of 55 to 69 degrees from April through mid-June in flowing water of Rivers. Broadcasting millions of eggs without affording any protection or parental care.
During spawning, seven or eight males surround a single large female and bump her to the waters surface. While the males jockey for position they create a lot of splashing sometimes called “rock fights.� Near the surface the female turns on her side with rolling and splashing. The males continue bumping her to release her eggs. As the eggs are discharged and scattered the males release milt turning the water milky white. Spawning can last several days. During spawning, a female can releases between one-half to three million eggs. Striped bass will continue to consume food during the spawning cycle, stopping only long enough to release their eggs or milt. Adult striped bass offer no protection or care for these eggs, and will move on once the eggs are released and fertilized. While the eggs are still in the female, they are only about 1/25 inch in diameter, but after release, they absorb water and increase to about four times the original size and possess a tiny oil globule. The eggs are transparent, making them virtually invisible. This change makes the egg approximately the same density of the surrounding water. The eggs become somewhat buoyant and are easily carried by the water currents. During the spawning act, eggs and milt are released into the water. The milt contains microscopic sperm cells which penetrate the eggs and cause them to develop.Fertilized Striped Bass eggs need to be carried by water currents until hatching (about 48-72 hours) to avoid suffocation. If the egg sinks to the bottom they die. The sediments reduce oxygen exchange between the egg and the surrounding water. This is the most critical period for young stripers.

The water current must be strong enough and the river distance long enough to keep the eggs and young from settling to the river bottom.

 

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Thanks Billo I always wondered how that worked. When they wash down the river I assume they end up in our back bays?
 

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The color of the roe tells the story. Many fish do have eggs but never lay them. They will be a blue or green color which they will procees back into their system.
fishing in the Chesapeake we catch a lot of fat fish. Unless in a tournament , we release everything. Even than we only keep the biggest alive for weigh in & than release after weigh in.
I always wonder why anyone would keep a fish this time of the year. The number of eggs that could be in a female easily out weigh a dinner.
 
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