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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Survey Indicates Striper Numbers Up
February 2004

A young-of-the-year net survey conducted by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has found that a record number of juvenile striped bass were born in upper Chesapeake Bay last summer. The average haul was 25.8 baby stripers per survey site, more than double the long-term average of 11.9 and the highest count since 1970. For the study, biologists collected 3,399 young-of-the-year striped bass from the fresh water estuaries where they are born. Heavy spring rains and cooler than average temperatures are credited for last year’s bumper crop of baby striped bass. The program, which has been in place since 1954, collects and counts young striped bass from 22 survey sites on four major spawning rivers.
 

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Steve

Thanks for the information but what does that mean for us up here? If we don't really know what the travle of the average bass is then we don't know if this will help us in anyway. Do they do anything like that around here? If they did then wouldn't that help support keeping the slot fish in place?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bill,
This article came from the Saltwater Sportsman magazine. Keep in mind this survey was conducted by the MD Department of Natural Resources, not the NMFS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Originally posted by Get it wet:
Steve

Thanks for the information but what does that mean for us up here? If we don't really know what the travle of the average bass is then we don't know if this will help us in anyway. Do they do anything like that around here? If they did then wouldn't that help support keeping the slot fish in place?
Chaz,
That would be a good question to ask Russ Allen. I would think that NJ does a survey for YOY stripers in the Delaware Bay or River. Not sure how often it is done.
 

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Originally posted by Ugly Mug 2:
Bad news for they're food supply...???
My one quirk about getting rid of the slot. What will these mean for the forage base...
 

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Steve

Or any of you guys have any of you seen or read something on How old a striper has to be to breed. I have been looking for something to read on the subject but can't find anything. Thanks if you can help me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Originally posted by Get it wet:
Steve

Or any of you guys have any of you seen or read something on How old a striper has to be to breed. I have been looking for something to read on the subject but can't find anything. Thanks if you can help me.
Spawning

In late winter and spring, mature striped bass move from the ocean into tidal freshwater to spawn. Spawning is triggered by an increase in water temperature and generally occurs in April, May and early June in the Chesapeake Bay.
Female striped bass may spawn as early as age 4, but a year class may not reach complete sexual maturity until age 8 or older. By contrast, most male stripers reach sexual maturity at age 2 or 3.

Shortly after spawning, mature fish return to the coast. Most spend summer and early fall months in middle New England near-shore waters. In late fall and early winter they migrate south off the North Carolina and Virginia capes.
Incubation, Hatching and Larval Stages

Striped bass eggs hatch from 29 to 80 hours after fertilization, depending on the water temperature. Larvae at this point have an average size of 3.1 mm. The mouth forms in two to four days, and the eyes are unpigmented. The larvae are nourished by a large yolk mass. Eggs produced by female stripers weighing 10 pounds or more contain greater amounts of yolk and oil reserve and have a greater probability of hatching.
The larvae's survival depends primarily upon events during the first three weeks of life. Typically striped bass larvae begin feeding about five days after hatching, depending on water temperature. Eggs and newly hatched larvae require sufficient turbulence to remain suspended in the water column; otherwise, they will settle to the bottom and be smothered. As the larvae grow, they can be found at progressively deeper levels of the water column.
Young stripers tend to move downstream to areas of higher salinity. Some less than 2 years old migrate along the Atlantic Coast, but many do not migrate until age 3, and most remain in the river system in which they were spawned.

I found the above information from a website. A 4yr. old striped bass can be about 21" to 23". A 8yr. can be about 31" to 32".
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Double post

[ 02-18-2004, 03:18 PM: Message edited by: Captblock ]
 

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Steve

Thanks! Where did you find that information. What web site was it?
 

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Steve

Thanks for the link it was good reading.
 
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