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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Being it's the season for respooling reels and going over lures, just wanted to see what some other guys are using on there offshore lures. On my islanders, I have them rigged with 150 fluorocarbon and most of my other feathers and small jets have 150 mono. Bigger chuggers and large green machines are rigged with 200 mono. Just curious what others are using, line, mono or fluorocarbon. Also what hooks for ballys and lures, single or double hooks? Spring can't get here soon enough!
 

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Keep in mind that I have to offer things other than what I use myself. Thats just the nature of the business. I learned quickly that people WANT what they see in magazines and newspapers.

When targeting yellowfin, I use 80#, maybe 100# on most of my single lures here in Jersey. If its a bigger lure, I may go to 150#, but I do not go higher than that unless we have other fish in the area. Most times we are looking at lower drag settings out there.

150# on my center/hook line on my bars, 80# on the other outside teaser drops. I find that the lighter line will create more action on the bar. I know a few big names use lighter line as well, for the same reason and IMHO they are absolutely right. When I watch video in slow motion of the bars swimming, I can see a big difference that I cant see with my eyes when we are fishing. ( video taken from the bridge or tower).

There are times when I will go a little heavier, but not often. I know the lighter line will result in more rigging and replacing, but I do feel it works better. If I am selling the stuff out of my shop, I usually go heavier, unless somebody requests the lighter line. I do not want a bar failing after a couple of fish because it was rubbed and damaged. I never know who is buying it and how they fish.

So if your experienced, your careful, have a knowledge of what is swimming in the area....I say go light as you can. It makes a pretty big difference in the action. :) I do not feel flouro is needed 80% of the time. Flouro is more of a chunking/jigging thing for me. Your tossing a metal bar in the mix with spreader bars, I really don't think flouro is making that much of difference? Just my 2 cents. But......if somebody says so in black and white.....it must be true!! :D
 

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Leader-Spreader bars

I attach spreader bars right to the main line, with good sucess. Is that a no-no in your opinion?
 

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You should have a length of leader equal to half the overall size of the bar attached to the spreader and then attach the end to the main line.

If you have a 36" bar then the leader should be about 20". The size should be at least the same as the center line of the rigged bar.

This prevents your main line from being cut off by the end of a flying bar hitting it when you have a fish on etc. We put vinyl caps on the end of our bars to help prevent this and also help prevent scratching the boat or your eyes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The only ones I run flourocarbon on are my Islanders, I think that if I am trolling pretty slow for BF they might pick up the mono..
 

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Illanders slow trolled w/bally for BFT = 120 fluoro

Illanders trolled at the edge = 120 regular for standard sized hoo, 200-220 regular for larger/select sized hoo, 300 on up for horses rigged for Marlin, etc.

Spreader bars 6"-9" squid = 200 down the center, 120 on the arms

Spreader bars Jumbo squid = 200-220 all around

Single big lures (bigeye, yft lures) = 200-220

Single large Marlin lures = 300 on up

Cedars/feathers = I run these on 100# as they're usually an inshore bait and fish can be leader shy

I use Mustad 7691 on my bars and bally rigs. I prefer 7/0 for normal/small sized hoo, 8/0 for normal medium sized hoo, 9/0 up for selects-horses.

I typically run 8/0 sized stingers on my 6-9" bars. 9/0 and up on my stingers for larger bars.
 

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We usually use 125 to 150# mono for all single lure rigs targeting tunas, and 100# to 125# mono for ballyhoo rigs targeting tunas. While fluoro has better abrasion resistance, with the cheaper cost of mono we just cut and re-rig anytime we see fray or abrasion. These leaders would seem a little light for blue marlin, but our view has been that we don't usually target blues and they tend to be our incidental (or accidental) catch on most canyon trips. The other thing we have done has been to systematically keep all our leaders on single lure/baits to 6 to 7 foot max, this way when landing fish we just have anglers reel right up to the swivel, keeping the fish on the rod instead of hand wiring the fish, right up to the waiting gaff. Especially in mayhem when covered up with multiple fish, it eliminates the need for a wire guy and a separate gaff guy. We do not find any diminished action with the shorter leaders, and they are so much easier to handle at boatside!
 
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