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If you dont know anyone personally that fly fishes, how would you suggest an interested person learns? I am very curious about learning how to fly fish...
 

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I plan on beginning to learn myself this spring and especially this summer. I've been reading a little and watching instructional videos on youtube. I don't know any fly fisherman so I am just going to practice and practice until I get the hang of it. I still learn new things about spinning/conventional fishing all the time...its almost like continuing education and I imagine learning flyfishing will be the same. Good luck. PS- Winter seems like a good time to practice at the local lake or even on a grass field, less people to deal with casting.
 

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Llbean in marlton nj does some pretty good fly fishing lessons. Otherwise maybe a member near you can step up and teach. I would be happy to teach you but it's a bit of a hike for us to get together...
 

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Joining a fly club is an easy and inexpensive way. Both South Jersey Coastal Fly Anglers and Atlantic Saltwater Fly Rodders would be good ones. SJCFA meet third Thursday of the month at the Bay Center in Ocean City and ASF meets in Seaside. Not sure of their dates.

Both clubs work with those wanting to learn. Our club SJCFA has casting before meetings once it gets light enough to do it. (probably March Meeting) Our regular meetings start at 7:00 pm and casting starts at around 6:00 pm. We have rods and reels for you to try or you can bring your own.

It isn't all that hard. As I have said before I wish someone got me into it at an earlier age. You will learn quickly enough that you should be able to catch some fish and you will pick up skills the more use your fly rod and hang around others that fly fish. After fishing for awhile you will find you do not even have to think about your casting. You just do it.
 

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X2 on the clubs & yes it is not hard but unlearning bad habits is VERY hard. Way better if you can start with some who are familiar. (Please don't jumb on first example) Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the info...whats the price range on initial start up equipment (ie rod, reel, etc) if you dont have anything???
 

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Fly fishing

There is no question, joining a club or having an accomplished fly angler is THE only way to go. Yes, you can do it on your own but it takes much longer, you develop bad habits that are tuff to break. It leads to frustration and far more "no fish" days than is necassary. Not just casting. Fishing as well. Why and which line? What flies? What kind of presentation? What's line managment? How and why is it so important to "stay in contact" with the fly? Working currents? Working structure? How to get your fly to the "fishy" depth? What's strip strike mean?
I've taught a great many people how to fly fish, both fresh and salt. Having an experianced angler spend a little time and effort with you will cut your learning curve dramaticaly. DRAMATICALY! I've seen it hundreds of times. Put it this way, the most frequently uttered words by the inexperianced fly rodder, as they're being told or shown something is; "Ohhhh, now I get it! I've read that but didn't know what it meant." Or, "jeeeez, I thought that was so hard or complicated, now I understand."

About your rod and reel question. Please let everyone know where you intend to fish and what fish you intend to target. totaly different equipment if you say, Tuna, or Striped bass or Smallmouth bass or trout.

It's all not that hard but experience means a great deal. Not someone that fly fishes once in a while but find someone that lives it and breathes it. A good angler/instructor will have you casting and catching fish the first day out. :thumbsup:
 

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Thanks for all the info...whats the price range on initial start up equipment (ie rod, reel, etc) if you dont have anything???
Depends on what you want/how much you want to spend...I mean you can get a whole rig for 2-300 or you can spend 700 on the reel alone. I would try out a bunch of rods before committing to one, as everyone is slightly diffent, and nowhere is it as apparent as it is in fly fishing. For instance I like a more classic slower action blank like you would find with glass or bamboo, while my wife has a faster cast and uses fast action fly rods

For line do you plan on fishing deep running fish or hunting near the surface, what kind of fish as well as fly choice will define the line weight and style. For instance on the rod I use for dry flies and smaller nymphs it has a longer front taper so I can drop a #20 dry fly without so much as a ripple...but to throw bugs for bass or salmon I use a shorter front taper to punch the flies through the air.
 

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There is no question, joining a club or having an accomplished fly angler is THE only way to go. Yes, you can do it on your own but it takes much longer, you develop bad habits that are tuff to break. It leads to frustration and far more "no fish" days than is necassary. Not just casting. Fishing as well. Why and which line? What flies? What kind of presentation? What's line managment? How and why is it so important to "stay in contact" with the fly? Working currents? Working structure? How to get your fly to the "fishy" depth? What's strip strike mean?
I've taught a great many people how to fly fish, both fresh and salt. Having an experianced angler spend a little time and effort with you will cut your learning curve dramaticaly. DRAMATICALY! I've seen it hundreds of times. Put it this way, the most frequently uttered words by the inexperianced fly rodder, as they're being told or shown something is; "Ohhhh, now I get it! I've read that but didn't know what it meant." Or, "jeeeez, I thought that was so hard or complicated, now I understand."

About your rod and reel question. Please let everyone know where you intend to fish and what fish you intend to target. totaly different equipment if you say, Tuna, or Striped bass or Smallmouth bass or trout.

It's all not that hard but experience means a great deal. Not someone that fly fishes once in a while but find someone that lives it and breathes it. A good angler/instructor will have you casting and catching fish the first day out. :thumbsup:
Mr. Yank is so right with the lessons or someone to guide us through casting a fly rod and understanding fishing with a fly rod. I started out on my own with no supervision but a VHS tape, no youtube at the time and no money for lessons. 30 years later still learning! But we learn something new every day. Not to get off topic but if you try to play a round of golf for the first time and then take lessons from a pro, you cut 30 strokes off your game. My suggestions to all is get your self a fly rod outfit get familiar with it and take lessons if you have the time and money. Remember fishing is fishing what’s the worst that can happen.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Are there any places close to Cape May County that sell fly fishing gear (rods, etc)? I would like to check it out as I have many questions
 

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BigMac Most fly clubs have free books and videos available to their members. Our South Jersey Coastal Fly Anglers as a good amount. If you would like to check our club out our next meeting is this Thursday night at 7:00 pm at the Bay Center in Ocean City. You are welcome to come as a guest. See what we are about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
BigMac Most fly clubs have free books and videos available to their members. Our South Jersey Coastal Fly Anglers as a good amount. If you would like to check our club out our next meeting is this Thursday night at 7:00 pm at the Bay Center in Ocean City. You are welcome to come as a guest. See what we are about.
Thanks it sounds good, unfortunately I am unable to make the meeting? Dont have a lot free time right now but im hoping things start looking up by spring
 

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Something that you also may want to check is the individual brands of fly poles. If you visit The Promenade at Sagemore in Marlton NJ there is also an Orvis store in the same shopping center Both offer casting classes, but also allow a chance to see on how a pole feels. Suttle differeneces can be felt. From there you could start with one of their beginner sets. (~100 for a full set up of rod, line & reel) A trick that I learned and works for me is to go one line weight up of what the pole is rated for.
 

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Usually lining up is a crutch for poor casting, take a lesson from a good instructor, most fly shops or fly fishing clubs can do the job. If fact most shops will be happy to instruct you if you buy a rod from them. Support your local shop, the knowledge and help they can give you, is worth much more than what you save buying on line or from a catalog.
 

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No one really touched on what rod/ reel to get. I have a 9wt 9' rod that I feel is a good all around stick for the salt. I have used it to catch everything from bone fish to striped bass. In my opinion get a good quality reel but spend your money on the rod. Just my 2 cents
 

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If your targetting big fish I would start with an 8weight-But If you really want to learn, get yourself a 5 weight-there are many awesome set-ups you can get for around 100$ for rod and reel-then there are many books you can get to teach you how to cast-just remeber, call directly overhead 12 oclock-dont let your rod dip past 1:30 or 10:30, keep your left hand stationary at your left hip, and never let your loop cross in the air-I'd start by catching blugills-then black bass-then trout then saltwater- a lot of guys find the salt too challenging and give up lol learn the difference between all the lines-sinking, sink tip, intermediate,floating weight forward and double taper, and cold water/warm water line--learn about the different casts-like the double haul and roll cast-most salt guys use intermediat I find floating the best choice because of quicker line pick up-good luck:thumbsup:

p.s. kepping your left hand stationary is everything!!!
 

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If your targetting big fish I would start with an 8weight-But If you really want to learn, get yourself a 5 weight-there are many awesome set-ups you can get for around 100$ for rod and reel-then there are many books you can get to teach you how to cast-just remeber, call directly overhead 12 oclock-dont let your rod dip past 1:30 or 10:30, keep your left hand stationary at your left hip, and never let your loop cross in the air-I'd start by catching blugills-then black bass-then trout then saltwater- a lot of guys find the salt too challenging and give up lol learn the difference between all the lines-sinking, sink tip, intermediate,floating weight forward and double taper, and cold water/warm water line--learn about the different casts-like the double haul and roll cast-most salt guys use intermediat I find floating the best choice because of quicker line pick up-good luck:thumbsup:

p.s. kepping your left hand stationary is everything!!!
Correction my friend. Most salt guys use a sinking line. It's a far less common experience to find striped bass high enough in the column that a floating line would be my choice. Wave action, current and depth dictate (in most cases) a sinking line. Even an intermediate line is primarily used in the back, less wave action and less depth. One exception is Albacore fishing where you could use an intermediate out front. These fish are generaly higher in the water column. I still use a sinking line in this case, fact is, for Albies, I strip so fast the sinking line never gets a chance to really sink all that much. Standard sinking line grain weights are; 8 wt = 300 grain, 9 wt = 350 grain. This is a general guide line for fairly high modulas rods.
I also find that using a "double haul" is very rarely neccesary. About the only time I use it or see it used is when casting big, wind resistant flies like poppers. When I'm doing this type angling, around jetties at night for instance. I'll choose my GL Loomis 10 wt cross current with a Monic 11 wt floating line. Yes....this is an instance that I jump up one line wt. Here's why, a 10wt Loomis Cross Current is an extremely stiff rod. Arguably the stiffest rod per rated wt there is. The whole Cross Current series is super stiff. That fact and that I'm throwing 6 - 8 inch poppers dictated a line wt jump. In fact, I initialy bought that Monic for my 11 wt Loomis but found it worked best on my 10. It would just not load that Cross Current properly.
The stated "line wt" on a rod is a generalization really. Rods are very different even though they may be 8 wts or whatever. The tapers are different, the modulas' are different etc. They cannot all perform optimaly with the same line head weight. Not possible! Certainly the manufacturers recomended line weight is a satisfactory starting point. Once you get used to casting, you'll be able to determine what line weight or grain weight line will optimize that particular rods performance. A couple of my guys and myself have honestly cast so many different lines and so many different rods for so long, we can pick up someones rod, cast it and know, it's overlined or underlined, regardless of what is written on the line spool. It becomes a very personal choice.
I agree with Frank. To arbitrarily over line a rod is a mistake. Case in point, my 8 wt zero gravity. I throw a 300 grain sinking line on that rod almost exclusevly. A heavy line for sure, but, in the keys, it's lined up with an Orvis 8 wt bonefish line and it could not function more perfectly. A 9 wt line would simply overload the rod. :thumbsup:
 
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