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Do the lowrider guide system like used on the st.croix mojo & legend help to prevent wind knots with braid? thanks!
 

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Do the lowrider guide system like used on the st.croix mojo & legend help to prevent wind knots with braid? thanks!
Not really. At least not in my opinion.

Wind knots, as least from what I've seen, are not caused by the rod, and have nothing to do with guide type or guide location. The ones I've seen have almost entirely been caused by the reel, specifically by retrieving line in a manner that allows loops to be wound on the spool. For example, closing your bail by turning the handle, rather than closing the bail manually, is a sure-fire way to get a loose loop on the spool. And then the next time you cast, this loop comes off the spool, with all 50 yards of braid spooled on top of it, and you end up with a gigantic bird's nest at the first guide. There's not a guide system in the world that can prevent this: what does prevent it is making sure the line gets spooled on the reel correctly in the first place.

The Fuji Lowrider guide system was developed for a very specific setup: for long (12 foot and up) rods being used to deliver extreme high-velocity casts with spinning reels. This kind of thing is evidently pretty common in Japan, where Fuji is based and where lowriders were developed.

When casting at these velocities, it is evidently common, when using traditional guides, for braid to bunch up at the guide, or, even worse, for braid to overrun the guide, where the line coming off the spool slows down enough passing through the guide that the line coming off the spool behind it keeps on moving and passes by the guide, on the side (it's hard to describe this; to get a mental image of it, imagine, as line is flying off the spool of a spinning reel, what would happen if you put your thumb over the guide ring, and prevented the line from passing through the guide). Lowriders, which are so named because they resemble the American motorcycle with the same name, have a design that eliminates these concerns. I know when they came out, a lot of surf guys swore by them, saying that they work better than anything they'd ever tried before.

I don't know anything about tournament casting, or about fishing with the same kind of velocities those guys can achieve. But for the surf rods I've built, I've found little use for lowriders. They have very long frames, and are heavy, and I've been able to get good results with lighter guides (and on all rods, lighter is always better, with guides and with everything else). Plus, I rarely build rods longer than 10 1/2 feet, and you really need at least 11 feet or more to get the most out of a lowrider setup.

For what it's worth, I've heard from a few guys that Fuji's new K guides have made lowriders obsolete. I've even heard a rumor that because of the Ks, Fuji will be discontinuing lowriders. I have no idea whether it's true or not. But if you're interested in lowriders, the Ks are worth a look.

The St. Croix rods that feature lowriders have a lousy setup. St. Croix took lowrider spacing, which is very specific and which is designed for longer rods, and shrunk it down to fit the shorter rods they'e selling. This has everything to do with looking cool, and appealing to fishermen who think that fishing a rod with lowriders makes them Serious Surfmen, and nothing to do with optimizing casting performance. The reason the Mojos and the legends cast so well is the blanks; they cast far in spite of, not because of, the fact that St. Croix used lowriders on the rod.
 
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