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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK I'm on my 6th rod and getting better with each one I make. My wife, well that's another story all together (I just keep blaiming all you guys on the Bass Barn as the impetus of this addictive affliction of mine :p ). I should have a sufficient arsenal come fall run of stripers. I want to start tying my own flies. Can anyone recommend a good book (lots of pictures and step by step instructions :eek: ) on tying saltwater flies. I would appreciate it.
Thanks in advance,
Joe
 

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Joe:
"Popfleyes" by Bob Popovics and Ed Jaworski. Well illustrated with step by step instructions for various flies. Should cover almost any bait fish that you'd run into on Long Island Sound.
 

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Just start tying clousers and deceivers. They catch anything all the time. Chartreuse and White. By the way, Clouser has a great book out that looks to be made by the same company that did pops book.
 

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What FFsaid.
 

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Got to give you guys credit who make your own rods. With chartering I have had 4 rods broken. TFO and Diamond Backs. Send your money in with rod for shipment and you have it back by the weekend. The one that broke a week ago they sent me a new one as they couldn't fix it.
 

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Joe, I too got into building fly rods first, and found tying to be a natural progression once I couldn't convince my wife that I needed another fly rod. I just went through the Newbie process a few weeks ago, and perhaps my struggles will be able to save you some aggravation.

Many guys get into tying saltwater flies with a lot of experience tying freshie flies. I had no tying experience of any kind, and really started from zero. If you're in the same position, I'd recommend the following:

- Buy Introduction to Saltwater Fly Tying by Scott Sanchez. I got it from Amazon. It is a great beginning tying book. I tried a few other books, but they all assumed you had some knowledge about tying, and said things like "whip finish the fly," and I had no idea whatsoever what the hell they were talking about. Sanchez doesn't assume anything, and gives you comprehensive instructions on every step, even stuff that seems obvious.

- Pick a simple but effective pattern; I recommend a simple deceiver in your favorite color (I chose white/chartreuse). You can even go to a fly shop and pick up a fly whose looks you like, and try to emulate it at home. Pick up a decent supply of the materials you'll need (Sanchez gives you a detailed list), and follow the instructions. Your first one will look like a something that got swept from underneath the sofa, but you will improve a bit with each try, and by the third or fourth or fifth you should be able to produce something that looks like you would actually want to fish with it.

- After you're satisfied with how your "learning pattern" flies are ending up, buy two more books: a saltwater fly pattern book (I like Lefty Kreh's Saltwater Fly Patterns, and Popovich's Pop Fleyes. Go through them and pick a few more patterns that look interesting, and try to tie them.

Right now, I'm at the point where my focus is on producing three types of flies: deceivers, clousers, and half-and-halfs. I may move on to other, more exotic stuff in the future, but for now I'm going to stick to relatively simple flies that are proven fish-catchers.

Whatever, good luck. Tying your own flies is loads of fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone once again. Belmo, I will buy that book to start as it seems more my speed right now.
Take Care,
Joe
 

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Joe,
There is no greater compliment to the fly fisher than to catch a fish on a fly that he tied.
a WHOLE new dimension is about to be undertaken by you. The challenge and the satisfaction experience are worth all of the effort in the world.
The earlier advice on tying books from Belmo is true.
There are many small techniques that apply to tying that you have been working on through your rod building. Others are very easily learned by spending a few hours with someone who has done it for a while.
Hair tricks, hackle, general how too's really.
If you have a buddy who ties, hook up with him for a few hours.
If not, shoot me an email or give me a call and we will get together an do some tying. The shorter your learning curve becomes, the easier it will be for you to enjoy success.
Normally this is a winter time thing. I make a pot of chili, a few buddies come over and we have a blast tying. But every now and then, we do it in the summer as well...but we BBQ instead!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Frank,
Thanks for the feedback and the invitation. Unfortunately NJ is a trip for me. I appreciate all that you said.
Take Care,
Joe
 

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Sorry Joe, confused you with another member with a similar screen name.
Ask around, I am sure there are some tyers who would enjoy a tying session.
 
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