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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
County Beach Conference focuses on federal funding

By BRIAN IANIERI Staff Writer, (609) 463-6713
Press of Atlantic City


Ocean water is free.

Sand costs nothing.

But keeping that water from swallowing that sand on New Jersey's beaches costs millions per year.

At the Cape May County Beach Conference, held Monday at the county administration building in Crest Haven, federal, state and environmental officials spoke about the need to protect local beaches and the beaches' importance to tourism, wildlife and the economy.

"It's certainly not about people getting a suntan. It's about jobs and the economy," said U.S. Rep. Frank LoBiondo, R-2nd.

The federal government pays most of the cost for projects critical to maintaining the state's beaches, LoBiondo said.

LoBiondo said a proposed change in the funding for-mula that would shift the major burden to the state and municipalities would not work. "I don't believe state or municipal governments will be able to pick up any projects," he said. "It's just too much money."

The loss of tourist dollars that the beaches attract could devastate the state economy in the way natural disasters do elsewhere, he said.

A presidential budget released in February would cut about $17 million for beach-replenishment projects in New Jersey.

LoBiondo said he expects "good news" regarding the House of Representatives' budget in regard to beach projects.

Assemblyman Jack Gibson, R-Cape May, Cumberland, Atlantic, said funding for dredging projects is unpredictable, and a permanent funding source is needed.

"New Jersey has never had a stable source of funding for dredging," he said.

Where to place those dredge materials is another problem.

Stone Harbor Mayor Suzanne Walters, who has learned firsthand about the problems of disposing of dredge materials, asked a member of the state Department of Environmental Protection, or DEP, about a possible state facility to handle dredge spoils.

John Garofalo, manager of the DEP's Office of Coastal Engineering, said the state is trying to identify and purchase disposal sites to handle the materials. Using the dredge spoils along roadbeds is not feasible, he said.

Just removing all the water from the dredge materials is a complex process.

"Beneficial use of dredge material is extremely expensive," said Bailey Smith, project manager with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

U.S. Sen. Jon Corzine, D-N.J., was scheduled to attend Monday's Beach Conference but was unable to come due to Ronald Reagan's funeral, said Freeholder Director Daniel Beyel.

At the conference, LoBiondo announced a new bill, the Coastal Restoration Act, that he said would strengthen laws that rebuild beaches in New Jersey. Under the bill, he said, changes in administration policy, such as the one that threatens to cut federal beach funding in New Jersey, will not prevent the Army Corps of Engineers from processing feasibility and other studies for beach projects.
 

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wouldnt it be cheaper to take all the sand that has erroded from the beaches from herefords inlet where all that sand seems to be collecting and opening up that channel? i mean the beaches in wildwood are are getting bigger and bigger every year! why not take it back and give us back our channel which they let close
 

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I've been saying this for years.. Every ocean county in NJ should have an inshore and offshore dredge and they should be running 24/7..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Lots of sand coming to Cape May and its neighbors

By RICHARD DEGENER Staff Writer, (609) 463-6711, E-Mail-Press of Atlantic City

CAPE MAY - Sand will be pumped onto city beaches in September, and the dredging company is then expected to begin filling in the eroded nook to the west of town on a strand that extends past the Cape May Lighthouse and into Cape May Point.

Merv Brokke, a spokesman for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, said Monday that the $2.3 million project should begin in September after the endangered beach-nesting piping plovers have vacated the area. The dredging operation will begin at the U.S. Coast Guard base and work its way west.

Brokke said 1.2 million cubic yards would be pumped onto Cape May beaches and another 1.4 million cubic yards would go on the strand west of the Third Avenue jetty that includes land owned by Cape May, Lower Township and Cape May Point. Brokke said that part of the project will probably start sometime in October.

Plans also call for beginning environmental restoration work at the area known as South Cape May Meadows this fall. This is expected to include spraying dense stands of the marsh reed phragmites with herbicides. A controlled burn would be conducted during the winter, in January or February, to clear out the dead stalks.

Brokke said information on the spraying and burning would be put in local and regional newspapers a week or two before any work is done. There was strong public opposition last fall when the pesticide spraying was supposed to begin. It was delayed a year because of an early frost.

Local officials met with the Army Corps, along with representatives from Cape May Point State Park and The Nature Conservancy, which owns much of the land, on Monday at Cape May City Hall for a planning meeting on the project. The meeting was not open to the public.
 

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Originally posted by Dunk:
I've been saying this for years.. Every ocean county in NJ should have an inshore and offshore dredge and they should be running 24/7..
I have also had that same idea for many years. For example, in Cape May County the dredge could just continuously dredge from Ocean City to Cape May. Then we would not have to worry about cuts in federal funding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sand will be pumped onto city beaches in September, and the dredging company is then expected to begin filling in the eroded nook to the west of town on a strand that extends past the Cape May Lighthouse and into Cape May Point

What's This Mean for the CMP Jetty's ?
Will They Be Covered ????
 

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Ocean City used to have it's own dredge and, if I remember right, it pumped sand from the lagoons thru the storm drains to the beach. Worked great. All they need is a couple of them up and down the county moving around from town to town and problem solved.
:D If it makes sense they won't do it. :eek:
 
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