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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking into installing Bow mounted trolling motor. Minn Kota Riptide RT 101ST/IP w/ i-Pilot, on my 22' CC Skiff. Here's my question. Which battery should I go with GEL or AGM or it doesn't matter.This unit being a 36v system. Weight not a big problem, space being more important. Any help would be greatly appreicated. Thanks in advance guys.

Haig-CA:wave:
 

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First, you want "Deep Cycle" batteries only.
Both AGM and GEL batteries need chargers designed for their special charging needs. They are easily damaged by overcharging (high charge voltage).
Personally I've had zero luck with GELs. 2 different batteries died within 10 discharge cycles.
The advantage of an AGM is its ability to take a high RATE of charge. IE a 100 amp-hour battery can be charged at 100 amps. If you do not have that kind of charging power, you may as well stay with standard wet cell lead acid deep cycles. The AGM full discharge cycle lifetime is about half of a wet cell lead acid battery. There is no maintenance other than keeping them clean.
Wet cell or Flooded cell batteries cost half and last twice as long as AGMs. Their charge rate is limited to 25% of the AH capacity. Keep them in vented battery boxes and maintain the proper water levels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First, you want "Deep Cycle" batteries only.
Both AGM and GEL batteries need chargers designed for their special charging needs. They are easily damaged by overcharging (high charge voltage).
Personally I've had zero luck with GELs. 2 different batteries died within 10 discharge cycles.
The advantage of an AGM is its ability to take a high RATE of charge. IE a 100 amp-hour battery can be charged at 100 amps. If you do not have that kind of charging power, you may as well stay with standard wet cell lead acid deep cycles. The AGM full discharge cycle lifetime is about half of a wet cell lead acid battery. There is no maintenance other than keeping them clean.
Wet cell or Flooded cell batteries cost half and last twice as long as AGMs. Their charge rate is limited to 25% of the AH capacity. Keep them in vented battery boxes and maintain the proper water levels.
Thanks for the info Archie, my space is limited, that's why I was thinking about Gel batteries. I have two batteries(lead acid) now, one to start & one for electronics with a switch too change them from one to the other. I never had any experience with any other type of battery other than lead acid, to compare about which one lasts longer or has the better cycle time.

Come on guys , I need help here. Batteries isn't my strong suit.

Haig-CA:wave:
 

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Another thing. If you are going to put these batteries in the bow, youre better off with deep cycle AGMs. Wet cells will have acid going everywhere from bouncing.
 

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Another thing. If you are going to put these batteries in the bow, youre better off with deep cycle AGMs. Wet cells will have acid going everywhere from bouncing.
That would be a serious consideration over wet cell. Not only that, but AGMs can take much more beating (shock & vibe) than wet cells since the plates are "packed" together with the glass mat. If the batteries are indeed being installed at the bow, then your decision is easy - AGM:thumbsup:

The US Navy switched from flooded cell to AGM several years ago for many of its backup applications and hasn't looked back since. If you buy a good quality, true deep cycle AGM and charge it correctly it should last a long time. Although, I wouldn't try to charge at 100 Amps:eek:. Most 100 Amp-Hour AGM manufacturers that I have reviewed for navy use recommend a maximum 25 Amp charge rate. Much higher than that and there is a risk of thermal runaway, which is as bad as it sounds.

Compare the weight of each battery in a given class to determine which is the better deep cycle. Heavier weight = more lead = less plate perforation= better deep discharge life, but lower cranking amps. Lifeline is a good brand, but there may be others just as suitable for trolling use.

My boat has gels, but only because I am too cheap to replace the charger that was designed for them. Charge voltage is more critical with gel than AGM. AGM can get away with basically the same voltages as flooded - just don't overcharge. Electrolyte cannot be added back in once it's released due to overcharge. Forget about gels.....

Good luck!
 

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Sears DieHard Platnum or Optima Blue Top are deep cycle AGM and available everywhere.
 

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general, i am actually looking at the same tm for my mako since minn kota has the rebate on now but i want to wait to get the 20% off couponn from cabelas first. since it is a 36 volt system does that mean you have to add 3 additional batteries to your skiff, so you will have a total of 5 onboard?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That would be a serious consideration over wet cell. Not only that, but AGMs can take much more beating (shock & vibe) than wet cells since the plates are "packed" together with the glass mat. If the batteries are indeed being installed at the bow, then your decision is easy - AGM:thumbsup:

The US Navy switched from flooded cell to AGM several years ago for many of its backup applications and hasn't looked back since. If you buy a good quality, true deep cycle AGM and charge it correctly it should last a long time. Although, I wouldn't try to charge at 100 Amps:eek:. Most 100 Amp-Hour AGM manufacturers that I have reviewed for navy use recommend a maximum 25 Amp charge rate. Much higher than that and there is a risk of thermal runaway, which is as bad as it sounds.

Compare the weight of each battery in a given class to determine which is the better deep cycle. Heavier weight = more lead = less plate perforation= better deep discharge life, but lower cranking amps. Lifeline is a good brand, but there may be others just as suitable for trolling use.

My boat has gels, but only because I am too cheap to replace the charger that was designed for them. Charge voltage is more critical with gel than AGM. AGM can get away with basically the same voltages as flooded - just don't overcharge. Electrolyte cannot be added back in once it's released due to overcharge. Forget about gels.....

Good luck!
Thanks SS, also will NOT be putting the batteries in the bow.

Sears DieHard Platnum or Optima Blue Top are deep cycle AGM and available everywhere.
Archie, I'm leaning toward Optima Blue Top

general, i am actually looking at the same tm for my mako since minn kota has the rebate on now but i want to wait to get the 20% off couponn from cabelas first. since it is a 36 volt system does that mean you have to add 3 additional batteries to your skiff, so you will have a total of 5 onboard?
GTTD, what Minn Kota rebate & what 20% off Cabelas:confused: Yes I will have to add three more batteries for a total of 5 :eek:

Haig-CA
 

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i am getting the minn kota 101 st w/ipilot and it says on cabelas website there is a $101 mail in rebate for the 101 st from 2/15/2012-7/1/2012. cabelas always sends out a 20% off coupon on all orders over $150, so i will wait to get it, sometime you can find the coupons on ebay also.
 
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