BASS BARN banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been using an A-Series Scott flyrod for two years now (my first flyrod). This is a lower end $$ rod and I has a moderate to fast action. (9wt. rod & line). With the intermediate line that I use I get the sense that it is not loading the rod very well. I really feel the load when I switch to my 350 grain sink tip line. So my question is would it make sense to switch to a 10wt. intermediate line to better help load the rod? Does action of the rod factor in?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,585 Posts
It may be that the rod speed is too fast for your casting style with the 9wt line. Do you feel the road load at all when there is about 30ft of line out the tip?

A 350 grain line, I think, is rated for 10wt. So yes, you might want to go up a size or two on your intermediate line for the extra loading weight.

I cast a 500-gr sinking line on my 9wt, but it "supposed" to be for an 11 or 12wt. I like how the rod sling-shots the line out because it loads so well.

[ 12-08-2005, 01:54 PM: Message edited by: Fly Ty R ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
789 Posts
LS,

I routinely fish a 10 wt. line on my 9 wt. GLoomis. Most of my early fly rodding was done with an Orvis Superfine, which had a relatively soft or slow action. Like you, I cast better if I can really feel the rod load.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,554 Posts
A lot of it has to do with casting style. Super fast rods of any weight do not suit me well. The only way I can do well with fast actions is to double haul with lots of line out. I am much more comfortable with slower tapers. The recent rage of super fast rods prolly hurts more casters than it helps.

[ 12-08-2005, 05:50 PM: Message edited by: Younger ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,585 Posts
Yup! :D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,198 Posts
Not sure I follow all answers but to the original question: Yes a 10 wt would load the rod more fully; you would be the only one to answer"des it make sense". Try to borrow a line before buying. Always the best way & certainly cheaper. We used to exchange lines all the time. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The more line I let out the better it loads, yes, but the sloppier my cast gets. The sink line does load so well with less line. I guess I'm fixin' to get a 10wt. line and slap a big old band-aid on my poor casting style.
Thanks for the info.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
like Dave said, a line should load a rod when about 30 - 35 feet of the line is outside the tip of the rod. if you are trying to cast with only about 20 feet outside the tip, you are not going to feel a rod load, especially a fast action rod.

another problem is rod weight rating. there is no standard in the industry to truly define what a 9 weight rod is supposed to be. so, one manufacturer's 9 wt may be another manufacturer's 10 wt or even 8 wt. flylines on the other hand are standardized, based on a set of standards published by the American Fishing Tackle Manufacturers Association (AFTMA). So, one manufacturer's 9 wt flyline should match another manufacturer's 9 wt flyline.

If you guys are interested, I may bring in to one of the SJCFA meetings this winter a jig that I have that will tell you once and for all what your rod's rating is, regardless of what sticker the manufacturer put on the blank. There is a system called the common cents rod rating system, and you can measure your rod by using pennies to determine the true weight and action of your rod. It's pretty cool, and should help a lot of people get the correct line for their rod.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,198 Posts
Joe You speak wisely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,854 Posts
Joe, sounds like a good thing to bring along to one of our winter meetings. It would be interesting to see just how it works. You told us about it at the rod making mini class that you gave us. I think it would be neat to see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,203 Posts
Rod action will be slowed by the deeper load, but it will function. To increase your casting arms sensitivity, try this:
Santa brought me my first fly outfit some years ago. Being so hell bent to learn to cast, I was on the lawn every night after work. The snow on the lawn made it tought, but learning to cast in the dark helped to heighten the sense on the rod "loading".
Of course, lessons and learning also occered in the daylight, but feeeling the rod load made all of the difference.
Fast action = incredibly tight loops.
Not easy at first, All things in good time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
thunnus, it's called the common cents rod rating system. you can google it and get a lot of info.

basically, you take your rod, level it along the centerline (axis) at a height high enough to allow you to deflect the tip 1/3 of the overall length of the rod. so, for a 9 ft rod, you would have to deflect (bend towards the ground) the tip 1/3 of 9 feet, which is 3 feet. you deflect the tip by hanging a paper clip and plastic bag on the tip of your rod or blank, and then filling the bag with pennies from 1997 or after (after 1997, all pennies weigh exactly the same number of grams). once you deflect your tip 1/3 of the length, you count how many pennies it took to get that amount of deflection. that number of pennies equates to a flyline weighting, which tells you the true weight of your rod.

another cool part to this is that once your rod is deflected 1/3 of its length, your tip will form an angle off of horizontal. this angle tells you whether your rod is considered slow, medium, or fast action. i forget the breakdown of the angles, but i have it written down somewhere.

it's a really cool system that a guy named Dr. Bill Hanneman (sp?) created, and it really gives you a good understanding of your equipment, regardless of what the manufacturer says.

[ 12-11-2005, 08:10 PM: Message edited by: doyle007 ]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I think I follow some of the answers here. Overloading a rod causes the loop to open as the rod is slowed down a bit. A wider loop, of course, is more prone to getting knocked down by the winds and generally is less accurate. While faster action rods may feel odd for some people, I have found fast action rods to be more forgiving of casting errors, while keeping a nice tight loop. Frank also mentioned casting in the dark lets you 'feel' the loading and this is exactly right. It is good practice to try casting in the dark of night and learn more about your rod and how to correct any problems by feel. It is good to get used to doing this. After all, when is the best time to fish for stripers?!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Good Information! Seems easy enough to rig up. We should all post results to see how different manufacturers add up...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
shanks, if you google the common cents system, you should get a website with the address of superbob. on that website there are already hundreds of rods that have been tested, so you may find the rod that you have.

as a matter of fact, i just googled common cents, and it looks like there is a new website dedicated to this issue. pretty cool stuff if you take the time to read thru it and understand it.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top