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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have been playing with the camera with diff results. Not sure how to get the best clarity. The editor has saved me with the lighting.







[ 05-19-2006, 12:02 AM: Message edited by: Bill Couch ]
 

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Very ice Bill - I like the bottom shot/lighting alot

I see we use the same vise - the fancy Italian ones who starts With the letter R are nice but I like the Regal better.
 

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Nice shots Bill. I think I remember an article on photographing flys in one of the mags not too long ago. If I find which one I'll let you know.
Dave
 

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Nice Bill Most cameras have a Macro setting but sometimes you get a better shot shooting in further away and then crop it.

I like the yellow black fly as a fish catcher.
 

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splash,
I'm not sure which issue but I think it was fly fisherman and the article was by a.k. best. I think they archive their articles online.
 

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Bill If you ever want to "field test" any of these in the Keys, let me know. :D Nice work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys, I think I better start writing down the steps that I used for better results. I don't get the chance to play with the camera much and I'll forget.

Sparse let me know what you want I have more stuff tied now then I will use. Tying up some Florida amo would give me something new to tie.
 

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Bill, I read the article Splash is referring to. It was by a professional photographer who takes lots of pictures for the fly tying magazines. I don't remember much about the article, but I do remember that he said that he gets the best results using an entirely black background, and I believe a very bright flash. You can see in the three pictures above that it's easiest to see detail in the one with the darkest background.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Belmo I agree, that does seem to work the best. I took one of a gurgler in blue after hearing someone say that color works. I think I like the black better.



[ 05-23-2006, 11:53 AM: Message edited by: Bill Couch ]
 

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Best results, put the fly in the foreground and the background in the background. That may sound simple, but in fact it's easy to forget. See in your last pic the shadow on the background from the flash? That can be removed by simply moving the fly forward enough (or the background back far enough) so the shadow won't reach the background. You did that in two of your first pics. Take a look at this shot to see what I mean:



I had the book so far back there, and the camera so focused in on the fly that you can't see any shadow. Plus, the background is blurry, making your eye focus on the subject in the foreground.

The best thing to get for taking close up shots is diopter lenses for point-n-shoots, or a macro lens if you have an SLR camera. These will allow you to practically put the subject right against the lens, and it will keep them in focus. Some point-n-shoots have ring adapters that go over the lens so you can put filters and such on there. Your's might not.

Here are some more examples:




You don't always need to have the fly in a vice or stand, either. Sometimes putting it in context, like on your tying bench, or even flat on a plain T-shirt is cool too.




And sometimes, the best way to shoot your fly is in the best place of all...



;)

[ 05-23-2006, 12:14 PM: Message edited by: Fly Ty R ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Those are some nice shots Dave, I hope I can take some with that quality in the near future. I'll try some with the background in the background tonight. :D
 

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Hey guys, I'm not a fly tie guy, however I have taken a few photos over the last 22 years. Try bouncing the flash off a white ceiling or white panel of some sort. You would eliminate those harsh shadows that fall behind the subject making for a cleaner image. Most pro shooters that do product photography use lightboxes which soften the light and remove those nasty shadows. You can get really good results doing the bounce thing. Another simple way to do it is by taking a white index card and placing it above the flash head at 45 degree angle with a rubber band bouncing the light into the card which then reflects down on to the fly itself. Now, if you are using those little snappy cameras with a built in flash...you're kinda screwed. Good luck.
 

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Good advice Rage! I use a speedlight on an extension cable for my Nikon, so I can place it anywhere for adequate lighting. Usually all I do is mount the flash on the camera and angle it upward, so there is an indirect flash. You can also get similar results with two regular desk lamps, one placed to the side and one exactly opposite on the other side, for adequte fore and backlighting. Or you can mass with their locations to get weighted lighting. You're right, those cheap built-in flashes screw it up royally!

There are so many little variables with photography, that it takes a while to get the hang of it. Once you figure it out, it's like "DUH, why didn't I think of that before???" :D
 
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