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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Going on our first overnighter and was wondering if anyone might have any suggestions or help setting up, safety tips or storing ice if you have limited space. Figuring on 1lb of ice per fish.
 

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Cabo32 said:
Going on our first overnighter and was wondering if anyone might have any suggestions or help setting up, safety tips or storing ice if you have limited space. Figuring on 1lb of ice per fish.
first off have you ever done any canyon fishing because my first suggestion if you haven't done that much is go with someone that has some experience under their belt if you go 100 mile from home and something goes wrong its a lonely place out there and learning from behind a computer is not a good way to gain experience,the best thing to do is get 1or 2 people that have canyon/boat running experience to go with you
 

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Epirb, Sat Phone or SSB and Life Raft
Charts of area you plan to fish
Good working knowledge of all your electronics and boat's mechanical systems
4 - 6 flats of butters
2 doz Ballyhoos
I'm not sure if you can estimate pounds of ice per fish since you never know how many you will catch, but 1lb per fish is not enough. I would take at minimum 2 large full coolers (162 or 178 Qt).
2 to 3 additonal anglers who are experienced offshore and know your boat a bit.

That's just a start. I know the list can go on forever!!!
 

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Not sure how much offshore experience you have fishing during the day. If not much, then the first advice from waterman is the best. Find someone to take along that has done this before. Other then that the equipment, prep, tools, safety gear and knowledge for an overnight is about the same as a day trip to the edge. Only thing is that it is a longer time offshore and you need to make sure the weather window is good for two days and not just one.
 

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Definitely sound advice to have someone with experience go out with you. It's also a very good idea to team up with several other boats heading out.

I may be misinterpreting, but it sounds like you are taking your boat for the first time. Do you have your float plan ready? Who are you filing it with and will they be able to check up on you?

Go through all of your safety gear and make sure everything is in working order (from fire extinguishers to life vests to flares to your medical kit). If you do not have an ebirp and life raft, reconsider the trip until you get them.

Inspect your boat thoroughly prior to leaving port (bilge pumps, thru hull fittings, fluid levels, etc.) Also, make sure you have extra fluids on board as well as repair items (extra hose, clamps, fuel filter, a good tool kit, duct tape, etc.)

As for the question of ice, the more the better. Get as much block ice as possible, it lasts much longer.

For the fishing, make sure everyone understands who does what when a fish is hooked up whether you are trolling or chunking (clearing lines, gaffing procedures, etc). Also, go over safety and operations rules with your crew prior to leaving port. It's a very good idea to have at least 1 other passenger capable of piloting your boat.

I'm sure I'm missing a lot here, but above all be safe and be smart. Oh yeah, and in between worrying about all of the things above, try to find some time to relax and have fun.
 

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I go all the time on a small 28' boat. My boat is outfitted for it thought. Not to discourage anyone but it takes more than just a run to the store to prepare for long offshore overnight.

Just do what you can with this list of my minimums

1) 6 man life raft ready and Painter secured (Or a dingy of some kind)
2) Epirp (If you can)
3) Fuel 1/3 out 1/3 back 1/3 reserve (Right out of the book, I follow it)
4) Ditch Bag Must have: (Water proof bag like the ones used by kayakers with at min.)
a) Handheld GPS
b) VHS Radio
c) Flairs (As many as you have )
d) Sea sickness pills (no matter how much a old salt you are. You can die without seasick pills from dehydration and anyone can get sick in a liferaft.)
e) Water

You can never have too much fresh water or ice. If you have no genorater Bring a battery jump pack. Never go out with a riseing sea forcast.

Do it! Be smart, have fun and good fishing!

P.S. I bring medical supplies Batodyne,Hydrogine peroxcide, Skin stapler, inflatable neck brace, Guas pads and wraps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
JerseyJeff, NBIJOHN, Waterman, & everyone else, really appreciate everyones concern & feedback. Yes, been out to the Canyon plenty over the last 5+ years. Just our first overnighter.
 

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Don't forget one case of beer per 2 guys.....
Seriously, if you've never gone overnight, or if you have like once or twice, listen to what these guys are saying. It isn't some day trip pulling fluke out of the ICW (and I'm not trying to be smart or imply that's what you think at all). You need to be VERY PREPARED. Night fishing the local bridges is dangerous enough. Being 70-100 miles out isn't something to play around with....
P.S.--if you are going keep everyone inside or on the bridge. Had a buddy in Fla. have a person go overboard at night. They saw him go over, stopped immediately, and it still took them like 10 minutes to find him...
 

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Oh, that's easy then. Just bring 2x the amount of [email protected]! you'd bring for a full day trip... :eek:
 

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Do you have someone experienced going with you? Definitely a must.

Our formula for ice is take as much as you can fit in the coolers. You can never have too much ice.
 

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One piece of advice form a guy who has been several times but hasn't got a boat for it... This goes for 15 - 16 hr day trips as well as 24 hrs or more at sea, but especially for an overnight trip.

Take at least 4 guys, 5 or 6 preferably.

I have been to the edge a couple of times with 3 guys and while it was still a good trip, I found recently that 5 guys on the boat made it a heck of a lot more enjoyable.

You get more sleep.
Work gets distributed among more guys.
There is never one guy left alone to do anything.
Others are readily accessable if help is requried with a fish or anything else.

I'm the last guy to comment but this wasn't mentioned.
 

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a quick read didn't expose these,
Flashlight -(You lose power you'll need to signal)
Glo sticks - (If you anal have everyone wear them as a necklace)
Coffee - (Even if Starbucks iced)
WEATHER - MUST BE RIGHT!! If it is rough forget it until more experience. Know how to read the weather this applys to all trips though.
Head lamps - If you don't have a generator
Generator - I consider this a must also be able to recharge your batteries if so needed.
Anchor - with enough rope to reach bottom w/ appropriate scope If in the deep a sea anchor
SAT phone is nice
 

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All good advice. Bring all the ICE you can. Your fishbox is insulated but add some tape around the edge for the run until the first fish to keep it as cold as possible. I prefer block ice since it will usually last longer. You may have some extra space in the lazarette under your fishbox to fit an additional cooler of ice. Store some of your butterfish flats in the livewell if needed. You might consider cutting up some of your butters before you leave. Otherwise, you've got the generator and all the other safety gear. Enjoy and happy hunting.
 

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Bring some warm clothing, gets chilly at night. Found out the hard way, thank God for rain gear, it's just not comfortable! It is very lonely out there, the radio gets quiet you may hear a little bit of chatter but not like day time.
 

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StickEm said:
All good advice. Bring all the ICE you can. Your fishbox is insulated but add some tape around the edge for the run until the first fish to keep it as cold as possible. I prefer block ice since it will usually last longer. You may have some extra space in the lazarette under your fishbox to fit an additional cooler of ice. Store some of your butterfish flats in the livewell if needed. You might consider cutting up some of your butters before you leave. Otherwise, you've got the generator and all the other safety gear. Enjoy and happy hunting.
No block ice if you want good tuna meat! Don't mean to get technical on you but block ice beats up the meat if its getting banged around all night or on the ride home and block ice doesn't let you get into all the cavities you need to cool down fast! You don't want to eat bruised up tuna it gets mushy. Chipped ice or cubed ice only if you want the best tuna! Block ice may last longer but its only an overnighter and cubed ice or shaved ice will last 24-30 hours no problem if you plan right and pack right. Block Ice under the bally bait tray only.

Bleed all your tuna, and collar them if you want extra room. You want to take care of them fish right and not sitting with their hot guts in them cooking from the inside out. If you're not collaring bleed 'em out in the corner with a tail rope, after they're all bled out a quick way to gut 'em on an overnighter is take a knife from the anus all the way up to the chin in one cut with a serated knife. Stick your hands up in 'em and rip everything out you can thats lose. Check their belly always to see what they are snacking on. May help you catch more. Shoot the cavity with salt water and pack em in ice for the rest of the trip and leave alone best you can.
 

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overnight canyon

Years back the only reason we stayed out overnite in the deep was "Swordfish"! During the late sixties to mid eighties probably made one overniter per 30 day trips ,fishing was that good. The last decade or so I made more nite trips than I cared to do. I agree with most said ,in a small boat iffy weather stay home. Running in solid six footers or bett:cool:er for 60 + miles is no fun, if anything happens you are alone. Early on, no loran, GPS, only radio's and your compass. Today you have the best of everything try to include most or use the buddy system, preferbably with a guy that has gone several times. Somehow a boat you know on the horizon always made me feel a lot better! Come to think of it today that's probably not a problem. Items on my boat for offshore, extra fire extingishers, known fuel usage, epirb, radio to go, and a good raft! I've always felt if anything happens at nite your gonna be your own first line of safety!
 
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