BASS BARN banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,482 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Dont know if anyone seen this episode where they shark fishing in CA Marina del ray i think. Anyway what are these guys doing. Everytime they hook up they run the boat away from the fish!!!! I just dont get it. We hook lots of fish next to boat and give them a firm hook set sevral times. The object is to get the fish closer to the boat not move th eboat away from the fish, I get "maybe the fish will jump in boat" but that could happen at any time the fish is near even in the end of the battle. I just dont understand those west coast guys with all their special chum techniqes and running the boat away just stupid. If the east coast boys fished there we would destroy them. Heres my points

why break the slick by running from the fish?
No chance for double and you reduce your catch numbers for the day

Whats with all the redicoulous size cables they use?
They have so many fish there they still catch but I watching them wait for a fish in the slick to bite. We all know that exactly what NOT to do when you have a fish in the slick, And if they used more mono and short signle strand wire they wouldnt have to wait so long for a bite.

Whats with the ballons?
Anyone say enviroment here. Com on' this is california they invented the enviroment.

Did u see the wiring procedure?
no comment...

The chum system?
Are they still in the seventies...... Frozen chum and a fresh carcass hanging off and a few fresh chunks ocasionally work fine. Who wants to pump the barrel?

more coming.........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
I seen the show.. i thought the pump set up for the chum was interesting but i am with you! A few buckets hanging off the side does just fine!! Lets go west and show them how to catch um up!!:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,819 Posts
i seen the show.. i have it on dvr.. they do things so much different then we do.. i can see running the boat to set the hook.. we have tried it but we like setting the hook reeling in to be honest.. there chumming is crazy and they only fish one rig from what it looked like to me.. but again they are chasing much bigger fish then we get over here.. they had that one big fish then the other that was well over 800lbs from what i seen.. they do things different and im sure people down south fish different.. we were all taught a different way.. also on the WC they troll for sharks and we dont do much of that here
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
One thing i have learned and know for a fact is sportsman TV is still just entertainment. You don't see everything and alot of what you see is out of context to make it more interesting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,068 Posts
I think they run the boat away from the fish when they hook up so it can't freak out and jump into the boat..thought I heard them saying that on the east vs west show.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
West coast makos are much larger fish then what we find on the east coast. I sharked fished for 3 years on the west coast and on the larger makos we always ran away from the hooked fish as the larger ones always charged the boat in defiance or were so fast would go under the boat and break off. Keeping the fish 50-60 yards off the stern helped us a lot, once the fish tired it could be controlled and brought closer. We spot fished in the very clear waters picking out the larger fish, no need to fish 3 setups at once like we do on the east coast as double and triple hookups would be a disaster.

We released nearly all of them so the end game was never an issue thank god as these fish averaged 400 + pounds. When they get this large they act very differently then our 150 pound east coast fish. Perhaps some of the canyon guys could explain this on larger makos caught in the east coast canyons, we only did battle with 3 large makos - 400+ pounds that all charged the boat several times and were all eventually lost. Not many options when sitting on anchor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,728 Posts
We discussed the boat technique after the show aired and agree that it's much easier on the angler to have the fish out and away from the boat rather than straight up and down. Tire the fish out then land or release rather than killing the angler. They had no problem catching two really nice fish so the slick didn't seem to matter or they went right back to their numbers. When your on the hook it's much harder to drop the lines and get some angle on the fish but IMO it's a good technique for landing/fighting big aggresive fish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
That thing they do when they gun the boat to set the hook always was odd to me. So, they let the mako take the bait, then gun it to set the hook?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,482 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
there is no reason to run boat away from fish.

thwy caufgt two fish over 2 days. I have caught 3 over 500lbs in one night off nj without ever running the boay away or breaking the slick.

they dont know what to do when they have a fish in the slick. The cable they use is too heavy. Im telling u they do what we did in the seventies.

They do have better quality fish but i can tell u if they spent a few seasons here they would double their catch there in ca
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,936 Posts
West coast makos are much larger fish then what we find on the east coast. I sharked fished for 3 years on the west coast and on the larger makos we always ran away from the hooked fish as the larger ones always charged the boat in defiance or were so fast would go under the boat and break off. Keeping the fish 50-60 yards off the stern helped us a lot, once the fish tired it could be controlled and brought closer. We spot fished in the very clear waters picking out the larger fish, no need to fish 3 setups at once like we do on the east coast as double and triple hookups would be a disaster.

We released nearly all of them so the end game was never an issue thank god as these fish averaged 400 + pounds. When they get this large they act very differently then our 150 pound east coast fish. Perhaps some of the canyon guys could explain this on larger makos caught in the east coast canyons, we only did battle with 3 large makos - 400+ pounds that all charged the boat several times and were all eventually lost. Not many options when sitting on anchor.

Thank you for the input. I love learning new things. After your explanation, it makes sense to me a little more now. They also troll them up much better than we do here on the East Coast, do you think the size of the fish has to do with the better trolling results???. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Stirring the pot, I see. Is it that time of year Val? I know that as soon as March gets hear i start to DREAM also.. Anyway good luck this season, I would love to go to West side and check things out, I almost went one time with a former employer to fish a tourney, and havent stopped thinking about it since....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,892 Posts
Those guys aren't stupid or doing anything wrong, they just fish a bit different then we do. As far as running the boat to set the hook that is the way alot of the veteran sharkers do it and it requires some skill to do, if we feel like we have a good fish on we definetly get the engines running, we keep a high flyer on our main chum pot set-up and just leave it, keep the track line on and and have never had a problem finding it and we haven't broken our chum slick we move away from the shark for the battle. We've had many a mako get pissed off once hooked and run right at the boat where they can easily get tangled in your running gear. I think alot of the guys who have sharked for a long time also do the same thing, we don't keep it to far but ussually at least 50-60 yds away from the boat until we feel it is tired enough to set it up for a harpoon shot or to release it. I remember when we first started sharking in the early 80's we lost a few nice mako's that came right toward the boat to see what was yanking on them. Guys would often think they lost the fish but it was hooked and just comeing right at the boat. We've had Swordfish do the same exact thing, so we do use a balloon for swordfish and put several of the small glow sticks inside so we can see if a balloon starts moveing toward the boat. Some guys say just harpoon them if they do that, one thing I most definetly know is to avoid trying to land or release a green mako or thresher, your just asking for trouble. Us personally never had a Mako or thresher land in our cockpit but most definetly saw a few boats that did and not something you want to deal with. We did come close while flukeing at the OG';s we had a 200lb Thresher come right out of the water and grabbed a fluke my friend was pulling in, that shark went airborn and when it came down it hit our gunnel and luckily went back into the water and soaked everyone. That could have been a real dangerous situation, every bit as dangerous as a mako since that tail covers such a large area it would have beat the hell out of a few of us. The guy who had it eat his fluke had never fished in the ocean before, and he looked like he was in shock. I went in the cabin to grab a shark set-up we keep rigged when fishing those areas. He asked me what I was doing and I told him once you change your shorts we're going to try and catch him, we're going to WHAT?? He was still amazed from what had just happened, but my dad and other regular were tossing chunks of fish in as I was getting the rod ready. John had a 2 lb bluefish we had caught earlier ready togo and we set up our buddy and went thru what he needed todo. About 20 mns later we had our bite, I set the hook several times, Pop had the engines fired up and moved away from the shark, I kept it closer then normal since we were near the fish trap pots once we got clear of them we set our buddy up on the rod and he did a great job fighting it. One thing that seems to help when fighting threshers is they just fight until they have nothing left, after a nice fight and 4 or 5 nice jumps we set-up on him got a good angle and stuck him . Our buddy could not have been happier, we put a slug in his head ( the shark not my friend) and had a nice 200lb thresher for the grill. As far as the trolling aspect which alot of West coast guys do, there are quite a few guys doing it on the East coast with very good results and just keep it quiet. I'm sure just like us many of you have had sharks grab a lure while offshore trolling, it seems at least out of Cape May they're ussually rat size makos, or if we get a bigger fish they often bite thru the mono, but we have landed a few nice makos while trolling for other gamefish. I like trolling for sharks and have been doing a bit more each season. you don't have to buy buckets of chum and baits, you can concentrate on the best structure and/or areas where your seeing alot of life. We do it a bit more each year, if we're haveing a slow day while ocean flukeing, wreckfishing or offshore trolling, it's not something you need to have buckets of chum on the boat, we run three lines one a few feet below the surface, one down about 50 ft an another on top. and we also put a fender bumper Teaser about 40' off the stern. the way they dig into the water and then explode seems to really attrack sharks, considering I had to make 3 of them in the last 5 yrs they definetly do the job. It always helps to keep an open mind when it comes to fishing, it may very well put more fish in the box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
292 Posts
Those guys aren't stupid or doing anything wrong, they just fish a bit different then we do. As far as running the boat to set the hook that is the way alot of the veteran sharkers do it and it requires some skill to do, if we feel like we have a good fish on we definetly get the engines running, we keep a high flyer on our main chum pot set-up and just leave it, keep the track line on and and have never had a problem finding it and we haven't broken our chum slick we move away from the shark for the battle. We've had many a mako get pissed off once hooked and run right at the boat where they can easily get tangled in your running gear. I think alot of the guys who have sharked for a long time also do the same thing, we don't keep it to far but ussually at least 50-60 yds away from the boat until we feel it is tired enough to set it up for a harpoon shot or to release it. I remember when we first started sharking in the early 80's we lost a few nice mako's that came right toward the boat to see what was yanking on them. Guys would often think they lost the fish but it was hooked and just comeing right at the boat. We've had Swordfish do the same exact thing, so we do use a balloon for swordfish and put several of the small glow sticks inside so we can see if a balloon starts moveing toward the boat. Some guys say just harpoon them if they do that, one thing I most definetly know is to avoid trying to land or release a green mako or thresher, your just asking for trouble. Us personally never had a Mako or thresher land in our cockpit but most definetly saw a few boats that did and not something you want to deal with. We did come close while flukeing at the OG';s we had a 200lb Thresher come right out of the water and grabbed a fluke my friend was pulling in, that shark went airborn and when it came down it hit our gunnel and luckily went back into the water and soaked everyone. That could have been a real dangerous situation, every bit as dangerous as a mako since that tail covers such a large area it would have beat the hell out of a few of us. The guy who had it eat his fluke had never fished in the ocean before, and he looked like he was in shock. I went in the cabin to grab a shark set-up we keep rigged when fishing those areas. He asked me what I was doing and I told him once you change your shorts we're going to try and catch him, we're going to WHAT?? He was still amazed from what had just happened, but my dad and other regular were tossing chunks of fish in as I was getting the rod ready. John had a 2 lb bluefish we had caught earlier ready togo and we set up our buddy and went thru what he needed todo. About 20 mns later we had our bite, I set the hook several times, Pop had the engines fired up and moved away from the shark, I kept it closer then normal since we were near the fish trap pots once we got clear of them we set our buddy up on the rod and he did a great job fighting it. One thing that seems to help when fighting threshers is they just fight until they have nothing left, after a nice fight and 4 or 5 nice jumps we set-up on him got a good angle and stuck him . Our buddy could not have been happier, we put a slug in his head ( the shark not my friend) and had a nice 200lb thresher for the grill. As far as the trolling aspect which alot of West coast guys do, there are quite a few guys doing it on the East coast with very good results and just keep it quiet. I'm sure just like us many of you have had sharks grab a lure while offshore trolling, it seems at least out of Cape May they're ussually rat size makos, or if we get a bigger fish they often bite thru the mono, but we have landed a few nice makos while trolling for other gamefish. I like trolling for sharks and have been doing a bit more each season. you don't have to buy buckets of chum and baits, you can concentrate on the best structure and/or areas where your seeing alot of life. We do it a bit more each year, if we're haveing a slow day while ocean flukeing, wreckfishing or offshore trolling, it's not something you need to have buckets of chum on the boat, we run three lines one a few feet below the surface, one down about 50 ft an another on top. and we also put a fender bumper Teaser about 40' off the stern. the way they dig into the water and then explode seems to really attrack sharks, considering I had to make 3 of them in the last 5 yrs they definetly do the job. It always helps to keep an open mind when it comes to fishing, it may very well put more fish in the box.
X2 ^^^^^ Been trolling for makos for 3 years.

I have seen 1 boat that had a live mako in the pit. What a mess...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,925 Posts
Why do the barn experts always think different....means wrong?


Those guys on the west coast consistently catch larger Mako's than we get.........but we criticize their techniques without understanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,482 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Why do the barn experts always think different....means wrong?


Those guys on the west coast consistently catch larger Mako's than we get.........but we criticize their techniques without understanding.
Just because they have a bigger fish population doesnt mean they know more. Look what happens when the Florida fleet goes to mexico . The outfish the locals. I totally UNDERSTAND. They fish the way they do because they dont have to fish as hard.

I critize their techinques because every one can be proven that it can be improved on. Not because I know better, but just due to common sense and evolution. Maybe if we had the fish population they did we would be less skilled as well because there is no reason to develop better skills when the LAKE is FULL of fish. WHen their population is overfished wacth how things will change. BTW I hope for theor sake it doesnt.

We on the east coast have be forced to advance our skills so we make every fish in the slick count. We work on double headers and multiple fish days. We rig in a manner to be more stealthy because we have too. The local enviroment forced us to improve our skill set. Theirs skills dont improve because they have so many fish. I make fun of them because it looks like the seventies shark fisherman on the east coast.

We have to better at everything we do here becase there is more competition and less resources.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,925 Posts
Just because they have a bigger fish population doesnt mean they know more. Look what happens when the Florida fleet goes to mexico . The outfish the locals. I totally UNDERSTAND. They fish the way they do because they dont have to fish as hard.

I critize their techinques because every one can be proven that it can be improved on. Not because I know better, but just due to common sense and evolution. Maybe if we had the fish population they did we would be less skilled as well because there is no reason to develop better skills when the LAKE is FULL of fish. WHen their population is overfished wacth how things will change. BTW I hope for theor sake it doesnt.

We on the east coast have be forced to advance our skills so we make every fish in the slick count. We work on double headers and multiple fish days. We rig in a manner to be more stealthy because we have too. The local enviroment forced us to improve our skill set. Theirs skills dont improve because they have so many fish. I make fun of them because it looks like the seventies shark fisherman on the east coast.

We have to better at everything we do here becase there is more competition and less resources.
I respectfully disagree.

Their methods and tactics have evolved to match what works best out there......as have ours.

To assume that what we do here is inherently better, everywhere.....is naive and ignorant.

Unless you have spent equal time fishing in both areas.....and using both tactics.......its not accurate to assume one way is better or the best method for everyone, everywhere.

I agree that they have larger sharks, and a larger population - BUT - they also release a lot (from what Ive seen and read).

Without spending time out there (SIGNIFICANT TIME) and try to understand their reasoning.......but feel knowledgable enough to judge.....seems wrong.


Remember they consistently see and catch larger fish and their tactics have adjusted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
881 Posts
Val- with this mild winter and water temps not plummeting as low as usual- do you have any predictions when the first makos will show up in south jersey this season?? (Of course I heard abt Over/Under taking one several weeks ago locally which was awesome but I'm talking abt the regular mako run and not an eddy)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28,819 Posts
Val- with this mild winter and water temps not plummeting as low as usual- do you have any predictions when the first makos will show up in south jersey this season?? (Of course I heard abt Over/Under taking one several weeks ago locally which was awesome but I'm talking abt the regular mako run and not an eddy)
its going to be early this yr.. tons of bait out there now along with tuna from what i hear
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top