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Is there any difference between the gas you buy at a gas station and the gas you buy on the water? I am pretty sure they are the same grades but my friend is telling me that the gas from the station isnt good for your engine. I hope somebody can clear this up for me.

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Valvetect

The fuel at some marinas may NOT be the same as what you get at a road gas station. Some marinas supply fuel that already contains fuel treatments for boaters. One of the brands is known as Valvetect. I know the fuel at Snug Harbor includes this treatment. For more information, check out http://www.valvtect.com/marine_fules.asp
 

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Some marinas in Maryland sell ethanol free gas. I wish Jersey would do it for boaters. Not that I've had any problems ....yet....but if they increase the amount of ethanol as they are trying to do I may........or you may.....


ethanol is for drinking not burning:D
 

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Why 89 ?

Two Marinas near me sell only 89 or 92.And always up to .70 a gal more

Come on we are not running high compression engines whats the deal?

My Yammi says it will run fine on 87
 

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Valvtect contains an additive blend to help combat ethanol problems and reduce carbon build up. That is a bit different, but the majority of fuel on the water is exactly the same. It's not all 89 octane. I've seen 87, 89, and 92 depending on where you're at.
 

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Valvtect contains an additive blend to help combat ethanol problems and reduce carbon build up. That is a bit different, but the majority of fuel on the water is exactly the same. It's not all 89 octane. I've seen 87, 89, and 92 depending on where you're at.
Capt. My marina sells I believe valve tech. I just looked at a tee shirt and it says marine blend.I rember the owner saying there were additives for the marine envirorment.I would sometimes bring along a can of gas of higher octane from the local gas station plus some of the additives you get in the marine stores and just dump it in but that gets to be a pain in the back.
 

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Don the higher the octane the longer the fuel last before breaking down!!

The higher octane prevents pre ignition in high compression engines. Actually slows the burning rate.

Most 8.5 to 1 compression ratio's run fine on 87.Not till you hit 10.5 to 1 compression ratio's do you need 94 or better.

99 % of Outboards and both Marine/Car/Truck gas engines are 8.5 to 1 or lower
 

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There is a misconception on the octane rating of fuel.
"If it cost more well its got to be better"
Well in this case putting 92 octane in just about anything you own is a total waste of Money.
 

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The higher octane prevents pre ignition in high compression engines. Actually slows the burning rate.

Most 8.5 to 1 compression ratio's run fine on 87.Not till you hit 10.5 to 1 compression ratio's do you need 94 or better.

99 % of Outboards and both Marine/Car/Truck gas engines are 8.5 to 1 or lower
Don is exactly right. In fact most two strokes are in te 6-7 to 1 compression ratio. Re-set the timing and they'll run on 68 octane. They do it all the time in the southern third world countries where less than 70 octane fuel is common.

Any marina you guys are buying fuel from that doesn't have 87 you should ask for it.. On te other hand if you let you boat sit for months at a time without adding fuel you are better off with 89.. Figuring some loss of octane over time.

Fuel that sits in your tank over the winter will be down on octane a few points. My recommendation is to take it easy on your engine till you can put 20-30% fresh fuel into the tank. At that point a shot of 93 isn't a bad idea to get the fuel in the tank back up on octane.

If you store empty like I recommend this is not a concern.
 

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I'm not a motor head so bear with me. For almost 10 years I drove a tanker truck for a major gas company. I have been to several different refineries, they are all slightly different. One ounce of additive to ten thousand gallons of gas is all they have to do to make it there own. This one ounce does almost nothing to the gas but is now called a different name (Sunoco, Texaco, Citgo). I have been to a sun oil plant where they serve the same product and delivered to three different company's. When delivering to the shore communities (yes several marinas) the most important thing is the stations tanks (sludge, WATER, and so on). Never heard of Marine blend, but some of the smaller oil plants could add something to the gas to call it marine blend. The octanes when delivering must be followed by, 89 is 89, 92 is 92. When talking to people in the business they say almost 90% of the motor vehicles in the US are made for 89 octane or less. Diesel and jet fuel is a hole nother thread.
 

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If your engine recommends 92 octane or 89 octane and all that is available is 87, I believe that the engine will run OK on it as the knock sensors on modern computerized motors will retard the timing for the lower octane fuel. You will lose a little power, but won't risk damage due to knocking/pinging/etc.
 
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