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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can't believe it will be June in a couple of days. Hope you guys are getting out. Frank called me to let me know they had a good time the other day with Ray. He also fished later with Chris,REN. Apparently the fish were thick cause they all had bluefish & bass. Some of the bass were caught on poppers & small crease flies in the tide soaked grass. Must have been a blast. Catch-um-up. Ron
 

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It has been three days since I fished and I told my wife, when she got up, if it was calm, wake me I was going to go fishing. With all the company still asleep I left for fishing. Got to boat around 5:30. It was a perfect morning.

Water was like a mirrow. With the top of the tide I decided to hit the back bay. Decided to wake the fish up with a popping plug. It didn't take too many casts and a found a hot spot. Got two on the popping plug and switched to popping fly, (a banger, silver/white) The fish were pretty thick with many swirls and misses. First bass on the fly looks bigger than what it was, my arm just isn't long enought.

The action was great and there were no knats, which I couldn't believe. As the tide went out and the sun came out the surface action slowed. I worked around looking for some action and got a couple of more bass on a popping plug and then when to a sort of bunker type fly with stripes. When I was out with Dave last week they were hitting the same size, but with only a mackeral pattern. Worked a point where the water was deeper with alittle bit of a rip and got one 28 1/2 inch bass and a short.

Around 8:30 the sun was getting bright, I could see bottom clearly and the action was done.

Kept this one for the company to take home and released the a slot and 6 shorts. This morning made may weekend. I wish I could say it was like this every morning. It's not! This was my best morning weather and fish wise of the season and I will remember it as being special. I wish someone else could been there too. My buddies invited me to go offshore sharking, but I didn't want to fish all day and this was 10 times better.

Now that the company is up, they all want to go fishing. I think we will be doing the boat ride, cause the inland waterway was starting to look like an expressway when I was heading back to the dock.
 

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Ray, Savor that morning. Sometimes they dont come often. Well put.
 

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Nice shots Ray! Glad to see you're getting the pic posting down. I really like that one from the dock. Great tequila sunrise :D . Looks like those EP flies are working for you.

I just tied up several nice flies this weekend. I haven't been out since the last time we went on the boat. It's killing me that I can't fish my new home waters, what with the horseshoe crabs and all. It's been too windy to take the kayak out, too. I'm itching to hit the flats. In a few more weeks it'll open up. I may hit Corsons, or some other "super secret spot" tonight, well after dark, if the rain holds out. The only thing I've caught so far was a really big 5ft land eel this morning in my minnow trap.


It's funny that it HAD to go through the little hole in the open trap, which has been sitting open next to my porch for about a month now. Stupid rat snake...
Mean sucker, too. Actually, it was inside my ceiling last week, eating fly squirrels or something, and now it decided to come outside. It's nice living in the boonies... :D
 

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Got back from the around the island tour. Looking at my marina, it looked like hardly anyone was out, but on the water it looked like everyone who owned a boat was there. We idled around Higbees to see if there was any action. There might of been some but it wasn't happening when we were there. Did see a small commercial garvey gill netting. Looked like they were getting herrring, it was hard to see if there were any weakies mixed in.

Back at the dock, fluke seem to be slow, to real slow. Didn't hear of anyone having a good day.

Dave, the ep fibers seem to work, I think because of the muted color. I tried brighter flys and had no hits and those long flys had good action. I think hollow flys would work also. You are so far out in the boonies, those tracks you showed us this winter, well they must be the Jersey Devil.
 

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Ray,

Nice trip, good fish, and great pics. That's the way they all should be!! Congratulations!!
 

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Good to hear from you Ed. Have you seen any weakies where you are? I am only seeing spikes and they are not consistant. Everyone that regularly fishes for the big ones has said it has been super slow and there have been some caught, but not the way they should be.

Bill, nice to of met you and your two sons, Looks like you have two great fishing buddies. See you on the dock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ray Nice report & pictures. Thanks for sharing. Like the fly. Ron
 

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Ray, we haven't seen any Weakfish yet. There are a few being caught here. Hopefully soon!!
 

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The difference is a few miles :D . From Delaware on south, they call weakies "trout", even though they are really drumfish. Technically, spotted sea trout (what they catch way down south) are a different species than weakfish. A few are caught in NJ every year, but not enough to target them specifically. Same with reds. But in general, the rebs call saltwater drumfish "trout" (with the exceptions being red and black drum).
 

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I wouldn't mind getting a big tide runner trout, or weakfish no matter what you call them. Almost forgot what they look like, would like to see one up close and personal. I am tired of looking at last years pictures.
 

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Speckled Trout

Weakfish

Among all fishermen along the South Atlantic Coast spotted seatrout have been the number one target for years. Their populariety is founded on their abundance, wide range, and willingness to strike a variety of baits and lures, plus their fine taste (although they do not freeze well and should be eaten fresh). These fish are sometimes called speckled trout, specks, or simply trout by the anglers who target them. Larger specimens of this species are sometimes called yellowmouths because of the color around their mouths.

Spotted seatrout are found all along the southern Atlantic seaboard, from North Carolina's sounds to the Florida Keys. Throughout this range they can be found along beaches, particularly in the fall and winter, but are much more abundant in tidal creeks, rivers, and bays. They are common on shallow sea-grass flats as well. With the exception of some migratory fish that move south from Chesapeake Bay into the Carolinas in the winter, seatrout are relative homebodies. Research has found that they spend most of their lives within a mile or two of the estuary where they were spawned.

Though there are several related species that resemble this rather slender-framed member of the drum family, the seatrout's hallmark sports make it easily identifiable. These round black spots occur in random patterns along the back and sides of the fish, and are also found on the tail and dorsal fin.
The very similar weakfish [shown above] is also found along the South Atlantic Coast and is the fish most commonly confused with the seatrout. The weakfish, however, has only faint speckles on its sides and no spots at all on its tail or fins.


Throughout its range the spotted seatrout is abundant in sizes of up to 6 pounds. Any fish larger than this is considered a trophy catch and is often referred to as a "gator trout." In the southernmost portion of the waters inhabited by seatrout - and particularly in Florida's Indian River Lagoon in the vicinity of Cocoa, Melbourne, and Vero Beach - fish of more than 10 pounds are taken regularly. The all-tackle world record for this species is held by Craig F. Carson for a 17-pound, 7-ounce spotted seatrout caught at Fort Pierce, Florida, on May 11, 1995.

Speckled trout are excellent quarry to challenge with a fly-rod. They readily attack brightly colored streamers; many fly-casters favor red-and-yellow or red-and-white color combinations. But seatrout will strike any number of fly hues, particularly when they are actively feeding. These fish feed at varying depths, from the bottom to the surface, making it possible to attract them to topwater popping bugs in a variety of colors.

Seatrout do show a preference for a fly that is retrieved slowly, whether a streamer or a popping bug. When you spot a fish approaching your fly, however, you should speed up your retrieve to resemble a fleeing baitfish. Seatrout are noted for their proclivity for making quick dashes at a fly near the boat or shore, just as an angler is about to pick it up for a new cast.

[ 06-01-2004, 08:02 PM: Message edited by: FISHNFOOL ]
 

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Bad night turns into a good one. Had to pull boat out tonight to take it in for service check. Called my fishing buddy this morning and said let's fish the high tide tonight and help me pull the boat. Well right around 5:00 the skies were getting ugly looked like nasty storms. It was windy raining and it looked like the party was over that it would last all night. Called buddy and said I would pull boat in the morning.

About a hour later the skies cleared, the wind totally stopped and it was like a new day. We rushed our dinners and got down to the boat at 7:30. Realized it was a full moon tide. The whole back bay was flooded over the banks. Had to use the gps to try and work back to the area we usually fish cause you could see any sod banks anywhere. It was really weird and the tide was still comming in. We both started out with popping plugs to see if we could located some fish. Within 5 casts each we both hooked up. I had a bass and Tom had a nice blue.

I went straight to floating line and banger fly, silver/white. Action was nonstop. I got three on popping fly, biggest was 27 inches and lost two hooked fish and alot of missed hook ups.

Tom had 8 bass and 2 blues on the popping plug.
Some of the fish were hooked way up on the top of the sodbanks in the grass. Picture of Tom landing a small one and holding his biggest.

Then the tide changed and started going out. What a mess all the grass and junk was comming off the banks making it impossible to fish. We tried moving and finally found a couple of spots where the junk was minimal. By that time it was getting dark and the moon was out strong. The bite shut down without a strike for over an hour.

I put on my bunker type fly and Tom put on a swimming plug and we worked a small rip line where the junk wasn't too bad. We were just about to give up when I hooked a bass. Tom thought my bass crossed over his line but he had a hook up too. Since we still had to pull the boat we headed in about 10:30. The moon was out so bright you could see like it was daylight.

Verified that full moon nights are okay untill the moon comes out. It has happen too many times. When the moon comes up strong the fish just stop hitting. It was a super good night both of us. Tom said he will try catching some on the flyrod next time. The glass conditions only lasted till the tide changes, and with the change the wind filled in, but those glassy conditions were perfect of using surface lures and flys.
 

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Backwater,
Yeah, they are both in the drum family . They are different species , though. Sorry I didn't clarify. I keep forgetting not everyone is caught up on the Linnean system of classification :D .

Trout, or Sea Trout, is a generic southern term for weakfish, spotted sea trout, and other saltwater drumfish (not including red and black).

Ray,
Looks like a great trip. Glad to see they're hitting consistently now. I guess I'm not allowed on the boat now until next year.....

Jinx killer!!


[ 06-02-2004, 10:10 AM: Message edited by: Fly Ty R ]
 
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