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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The NJDEP Division of Fish and Wildlife is informing recreational saltwater anglers and commercial fishermen of recent regulatory changes for river herring and tautog fisheries. These actions were taken to comply with Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) management plans for river herring and tautog.

Effective immediately, no person shall take, possess, land, purchase, sell or offer for sale any river herring (alewife and blueback) in the marine waters of the State. Only commercial vessels fishing exclusively in Federal waters while operating a valid Federal permit for Atlantic mackerel and/or Atlantic herring may possess river herring, up to a maximum of five percent by weight of all species possessed.

These regulations were put in place due to concerns about the significant coastwide decline of river herring stocks.

For more information regarding the changes, including season, limit and size information, visit http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/news/2012/herring-tog_regchange.htm on the division's website.


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No shocker on the herring... What's the tog deal ??
 

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TAUTOG RECREATIONAL SEASONS AND LIMITSDATES# FISHMINIMUM SIZEJan. 1 - Feb. 284 fish15"Mar. 1 - Mar. 31CLOSEDApr. 1 - Apr. 30415"May 1 - Jul. 26CLOSEDJul. 27 - Aug. 31115"Sept. 1 - Oct. 17CLOSEDOct. 18 - Nov. 15115"Nov. 16 - Dec. 31415"
 

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Retry

Jan. 1 - Feb. 28 (4 fish) 15"
Mar. 1 - Mar. 31 CLOSED
Apr. 1 - Apr. 30 (4 fish) 15"
May 1 - Jul. 26 CLOSED
Jul. 27 - Aug. 31 (1 fish) 15"
Sept. 1 - Oct. 17 CLOSED
Oct. 18 - Nov. 15 (1 fish) 15"
Nov. 16 - Dec. 31 (4 fish) 15"
 

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Now if we can just get the seabass back in January..............
 

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Eeeeeekkkk.....sucks for the shore bound togger. I haven't had a chance to poke around after the email mentioned nada on the tog regs. Is that official?

Let em spawn, but taking the closure to the end of July?

RyanF
 

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Why is it open for four fish when they spawn in april(observed this diving once)..... WTF!!! Wonder what genius came up with those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Let The House Burn: The Wrong Strategy For Marine Fisheries

Sunday, February 5th, 2012 at 11:41 AM
Tags: Anthony MauroAnti-Hunting GroupsConservationconservation blogConservation CornerConservation NewsHunting NewsShooting Industry News

By Anthony P .Mauro, Sr copyright (c) 2012
By: Anthony P. Mauro, Sr

It’s been nearly a year since I last wrote about the precipitous decline in New Jersey’s fisheries management capabilities, and the trend continues unabated.
Last year it was a free registry that prompted many people to examine the ruinous underfunding of the Bureau of Marine Fisheries (BMF) and this year it is the closure of the river herring fishery.
According to “The Economic Contribution of Marine Angler Expenditures in the United States”,a reportprepared by NOAA Fisheries for the US Department of Commerce, marine recreational fishing in New Jersey is an industry that generates sales of $1.6 billion, provides total tax revenue of $242 million and New Jersey tax revenue in excess of $100 million. In fact, fishing supports 10,000 jobs and provides the highest sales, income and employment of the Northeast region, as well as the highest tax revenues. Fishing also supports a tourism industry worth $16 billion.
Saltwater fishing is not only a recreational and economic engine for New Jersey; anglers and their disposable income are the source of essential conservation initiatives. It is the BMF that is responsible for the administration of marine fisheries management programs that include 127 miles of Atlantic coast and 83 miles of bayshore. The purpose of the bureau is to protect, conserve and enhance marine fisheries resources and their habitat.
With such an important and high profile contribution to New Jersey’s socioeconomic well-being and environmental health one would be forgiven for thinking that the BMF is a formidable competitor for state budget appropriations and is given priority for its potential to expand state revenues.
In fact, nothing could be further from the truth.
Incredibly, BMF operates on an appropriated budget that is less than $2 million while multiple coastal states have budgets that exceed $20 million. New Jersey currently ranks last in total State Marine funding per angler among every Atlantic Coast State. Since 1988, the Bureau’s appropriated budget has increased only by the inflation factor and not in real terms and at the same time federally mandated Fisheries Management Plans (FMPs) have increased from one (1) in 1988 to 22 in 2009.​
In a recent New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection announcement of the shutdown of the river herring fishery blame was assigned to inadequate resources to prove that the fishery was sustainable to the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission. This deficit should concern us since it may be cause for future fishery closures given that New Jersey competes with Atlantic Coast States that are in a better position to justify coast-wide fisheries quotas.
Let the house burn

Metaphorically speaking, the tacit message sent by policy makers and legislators has been clear; let the house burn. The metaphorical house is the Bureau of Marine Fisheries. The arsonist in this figure of speech is the angling community that has lit the flame with apathy and fear.
My definition of the angling community includes the individual angler that has refused to hold our state government accountable for adequately funding BMF, and saltwater fishing organizations that have allowed the situation to dilapidate in order to avoid the conflict that will be created by addressing the problem – conflict that might cause a potential loss in membership rolls and associated fees. However, to let the house burn makes both government representatives and the angling community accomplices in negligence.
During the past decade attrition and the forfeiture of institutional knowledge has crippled BMF and it might take an equal number of years to reverse. While finding a solution to funding BMF may be difficult the first course of action is clear – it will take an honest assessment of the problem and the development of a viable solution. To accomplish the task requires angler involvement, leadership from saltwater organizations like the New Jersey Outdoor Alliance and all 23 NJOA (CF) council members including NJSFSC and JCAA, and the courage to do the right thing.
I think it is appropriate to end this commentary with a quote from Izaac Walton, renown for celebrating the art and spirit of fishing, “Rivers and the inhabitants of the watery elements are made for wise men to contemplate and for fools to pass by without consideration.”
Color The Green Movement Blue

Ant


About: Anthony P. Mauro, Sr, (also known as “Ant” to friends and associates) is Chairman and co-founder of the New Jersey Outdoor Alliance, New Jersey Outdoor Alliance Conservation Foundation, and New Jersey Outdoor Alliance Environmental Projects. Ant’s commitment to the principles of sustainable use of natural resources and environmental stewardship helped to create the New Jersey Angling & Hunting Conservation Caucus (NJA&HC). The NJA&HC is the first outdoor caucus of its kind in New Jersey and is designed to educate opinion leaders and policy makers about the principles of conservation; the foundation for healthy ecosystems, fish and wildlife. Related Articles:
 

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>> The arsonist in this figure of speech is the angling community that has lit the flame with apathy and fear.

So what Anthony is saying here is that the reason that our state government is not allocating enough money to marine fisheries is the fault of the anglers themselves? We’re the ones to blame for a fiscally mismanaged bureaucracy? Typical of an organization which claims to be “the NJEA of the outdoor community.” Instead of fighting to protect the interests of the students, the organization is blaming the mentors of the private sector while providing cover for an inefficient public sector bureaucracy.

Cute.

>> My definition of the angling community includes the individual angler that has refused to hold our state government accountable for adequately funding BMF, and saltwater fishing organizations that have allowed the situation to dilapidate in order to avoid the conflict that will be created by addressing the problem – conflict that might cause a potential loss in membership rolls and associated fees.

So, instead of representing the interests and opinions of its “membership” Anthony’s response is that some “saltwater fishing organizations” should run counter to its own mission and stand up for the state bureaucracy instead of the actual “membership” that pays its “associated fees” to have their rights heard? In other words (perhaps to paraphrase), he’s saying “forget about what your members want, the right thing to do is to stand up for the fiscal well-being of the public sector government agencies because that’s the right thing to do.”

Strange that the vast majority of the herring fishermen in New Jersey who are impacted by this closure fish up the rivers near Batsto and areas like Forge Pond in Point Pleasant where a freshwater fishing license is required to harvest herring. With those license dollars, why wasn’t more resource dedicated to herring studies to protect these license holders? Also, why are other states which DO have both saltwater fishing licenses and freshwater licenses also shutting down their own respective herring fisheries (Virginia, Maryland, Massachusetts, etc.)

The answer of course is because the herring fishery is in trouble, has been for years, due to environmental factors and mid-water trawlers who have decimated the fishery. It’s true that there’s not enough research or enforcement being directed towards this valuable fishery, but to say it’s the fault of the anglers or angler organizations is disturbing. Individuals have already gotten involved in the Save the Summer Flounder Fishery Fund (SSFFF) and are working through the Partnership for Mid Atlantic Fisheries Science (PMAFS) as well to meet these types of issues.

Perhaps Anthony is unaware of the fact that responsible fishermen have already been working together through the Coalition for the Atlantic Herring Fishery’s Orderly, Informed and Responsible Long-Term Development (CHOIR) since 2002. Perhaps instead of chastising the fishing public, Anthony could visit www.choircoalition.org and put his money where his mouth and foot meet.

It should also be noted that RFA has been a frequent attendee at budget hearings over the past 16 years in the state of New Jersey, appealing to legislators along with past and present governors to allocate more funding for marine fisheries. No one in from our office remembers Anthony in attendance for the March 14, 2011 NJ Senate Budget Committee hearings where RFA-NJ officially requested that $3.5 million be budgeted for management of shell and marine fisheries for Fiscal Year 2012. RFA's official comments were addressed to the Chairman of the New Jersey Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee, Sen. Paul Sarlo (D-Wood-Ridge), but were directed towards the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) which is responsible for managing the state's marine fisheries. You can take a look at the RFA-NJ bulletin here (www.joinrfanj.org/prod/docs/press/rfa_nj_20110315.pdf) or perhaps Anthony has a similar letter in his files which he might’ve sent to Budget Committee Chair Sarlo in making a similar appeal for additional funding (www.joinrfa.org/press/NJSenateBudgetFY12_RFA.pdf).

Sad state of affairs when a bloated DEP trivializes its marine division by starving it of funds, yet a public sector lobbying organization hurls arrows and insults at members of the saltwater recreational fishing community making it seem as if WE anglers are to blame for continued bureaucratic neglect.

Stick to canned hunts, shootin’ bears and providing cover for a mismanaged public sector Anthony, and leave marine fisheries to the saltwater fishermen.
 

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You know what would be really nice, if both of your organizations stopped bickering and spewing your rhetoric and actually help the nj marine fisheries administration get the budget issues addressed so they can do their jobs. Can you imagine having a united front and putting pressure on the state legislature to resolve this. One thing a career politician wants is to get re-elected, they'll listen if they get threaten on losing their seats.

United we conquer, divided we fall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
NJOA: What NJ Saltwater Fishing & Fisheries Can Be

NJOA
Release
Belmar, NJ
2/9/12


I received a number of emails regarding the article "Let the house burn: the wrong strategy for marine fisheries." Most of the emails had a common question about what other states are doing with their fisheries, the programs they support, the value they bring to natural resource conservation and recreational saltwater fishing.


Below is a recent article that speaks to North Carolina. NC has issued 14 grant approvals in the amount of $1.99 million, which is approximately the entire state appropriation for New Jersey's Bureau Marine Fisheries.


The purpose of providing the article is not to highlight "what New Jersey is not" but instead "what New Jersey can be" when the issue of adequate funding is finally resolved.





http://www.jdnews.com/news/fisheries-99902-grants-fishing.html



Fisheries announces 14 grant approvals
January 26, 2012 7:59 AM
DAILY NEWS STAFF


The N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission announced Tuesday the approval of 14 grants, totaling $1.99 million, for projects to help provide coastal fishing access and support fisheries and habitat research.


The grants approved for the 2012 cycle are under three catagories (headings in bold type):



1. People (public education and public water access)

* Take a Kid Fishing -- $25,000
One-year funding for a multi-year grant to provide disabled and disadvantaged youth an opportunity to go saltwater fishing while teaching them about ethical fishing practices, conservation and the ocean environment.



* Long Bay Artificial Reef Association -- $220,622
One-year grant to place reef material on Artificial Reef-430 off Brunswick County to enhance the effective and responsible development of artificial reefs for long-term fishery enhancement.

* N. C. Division of Marine Fisheries' Saltwater fishing Tournament -- $25,727
Year-one funding for a multi-year grant to enhance and support the program, which produces citations that recognize recreational anglers for exceptional catches of marine finfish common to North Carolina.

* Friends of the N.C. Maritime Museum -- $28,620
Year-one funding for a multi-year grant to develop and implement a public exhibit with related educational materials centered on North Carolina's recreational fisheries.

* Wildlife Resources Commission's Brick Landing Road Boating Access -- $350,000
One-year grant to design and construct one new concrete ramp, floating docks, 24 paved parking spaces and Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, features.

* Wildlife Resources Commission's ADA Coastal Boating Access, Year-One Funding -- $140,000
Multi-year grant to make all of the commission's coastal boating access sites ADA compliant.

* Town of Oriental -- $67,400
One-year grant to enhance the Oriental Artificial Reef-396 by purchasing and deploying reef balls and other materials.

2. Fish (fisheries research projects)

* University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Acoustic Tagging of Southern Flounder -- $161,874
Year-one funding of a multi-year grant to evaluate the migration dynamics and within-estuary habitat use of southern flounder.

* East Carolina University Cooperative Winter Tagging Cruise -- $238,836
Year-one funding of a multi-year grant to tag striped bass and Atlantic sturgeon in the Atlantic Ocean, and sample all species encountered, to assist in assessing fishing mortality on coastal migratory stocks of striped bass, including the Albemarle-Roanoke stock.



3. Habitat( habitat protection and research)

* N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries' Oyster Shell Recycling Program -- $28,000
One-year grant to increase public exposure to the program to increase participation and provide additional shell material that will be used to enhance fish habitat, reduce solid waste in landfills and increase awareness of the importance of a healthy oyster population.

* N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries' Inshore Fishing/Oyster Reefs -- $469,427
Year-one funding of a multi-year grant to increase easily accessible and high-quality angling opportunities by creating three coastal recreational fishing reefs in close proximity to coastal towns and public boat ramps.

* University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Ecosystem Function of Oyster Shoreline Stabilization -- $87,501
One-year grant to study the impacts of oyster reefs on shoreline stabilization, specific parameters of oyster health and condition in created reefs, and the ecosystem benefit from oysters.

* University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, Defining the Critical Depth for Intertidal Oyster Reef Restoration -- $39,491
Year-one funding of a multi-year grant to evaluate restored oyster reef evolution and sustainability across various water depths and determine the critical elevation threshold at which future restoration will likely be most successful.

* University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, Acoustic Tracking of Adult Red Drum and Sheepshead -- $107,847
Year-one funding of a multi-year grant to track adult red drum and sheepshead to evaluate restored habitat function.




###########







Anthony P. Mauro, Sr

Chair
New Jersey Outdoor Alliance
New Jersey Outdoor Alliance Conservation Foundation
New Jersey Outdoor Alliance Environmental Projects
 

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The only thing Anthony got right is the fact that the fishermen pay an exorbitant amount of money now to the state and the state only budgets $2 million to Fish and Wildlife. What a crime that is. Until the state uses the money they now receive properly I will not agree to another penny out of my pocket for the politicians to squander away at their whim.

Directly from Anthony's statement:

According to “The Economic Contribution of Marine Angler Expenditures in the United States”,a report prepared by NOAA Fisheries for the US Department of Commerce, marine recreational fishing in New Jersey is an industry that generates sales of $1.6 billion, provides total tax revenue of $242 million and New Jersey tax revenue in excess of $100 million. In fact, fishing supports 10,000 jobs and provides the highest sales, income and employment of the Northeast region, as well as the highest tax revenues. Fishing also supports a tourism industry worth $16 billion.
Incredibly, BMF operates on an appropriated budget that is less than $2 million while multiple coastal states have budgets that exceed $20 million. New Jersey currently ranks last in total State Marine funding per angler among every Atlantic Coast State. Since 1988, the Bureau’s appropriated budget has increased only by the inflation factor and not in real terms and at the same time federally mandated Fisheries Management Plans (FMPs) have increased from one (1) in 1988 to 22 in 2009.
The budgeting problem is what needs to be fixes, not the income source. The state already has plenty of income from the fishermen to use. They just use it for everything but the fishing industry.
 

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Question??????

Let me ask a dumb question if fishing the Big D and launching and being from Pa can you use hearing , on the Delaware River that is??
 

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Who is the RFA?
"The board and staff of the RFA is dominated by fishing-boat builders, fishing-gear manufacturers, advertisers fronting as fishing writers, party-boat owners and charter-boat owners who call themselves sport fishermen but who, under Magnuson’s definition, are commercials because they retain and sell their clients’ catch.
The RFA would get more respect if it was honest and called itself a trade association.
http://www.flyrodreel.com/node/14680
Must be winter........... Benny's back. And going a woman moniker. Nice touch. And probably appropiate.

Im on the RFA-NJ board and I dont build boats, sell gear, run a charter boat, and barely ever boat fish. I do however consider myself a fisherman, surf to be precise, and one thats more involved than most. Sole goal is to ensure my two (soon to be three) young boys have the same oppurtunites Ive had in my fishing travels.

At no point has my efforts or opinions been diluted or ignored by anyone at rfa. The more involved you get the more you see how powerful we, rec anglers, could be if we ever got our act together.
 

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The more involved you get the more you see how powerful we, rec anglers, could be if we ever got our act together.
This could not be more true. For the amount of people who b*tch online about the charter boat captains/party boat captains/commercial interests, very few of them realize that all the meetings are full of these guys. Their livelihoods depend upon this so they are there.

I talked to a guy at the AC boat show about the RFA. He said that he just wants to enjoy his time on the water, and that he will rely on the guy next to him to take up the fight for him. Us individual recs need to get more involved. We are a selfish and greedy bunch, full of people who are quick to b*tch and moan with little interest in trying to get involved beyond blindly forwarding a pre-drafted letter when someone makes it so easy as to click a link on a forum.

I am a young dude and haven't been involved very much. I could definetaly be more involved as well, but the amount of interested recreational anglers on the forums just does not translate into the number it should be who are actually doing anything......we are our own worst enemy.

The least everyone should do is join a group or two. The RFA, the NJOA, the CCA, NJBBA, whatever.

Not sure if the tog/river herring thread is the best place to put this, but has anyone shared their ideas with the MAMFC: http://www.mafmc.org/vision/

Just like everything else, I am sure they are hearing from plenty of party and charter boat captains, commercial guys and environmental groups. Probably only a handful of individual recs, so where will we fall in this new "vision"???

RyanF
 

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Saltwater License

I object to any saltwater license because its just the same governmnent grab as Social Security has become. Even if the wording of the license stipulates the money only be spent on saltwater fisheries we all know the government will figure a way to get their dirty mits on the money. No, the solution is a complete removal of all sitting members of the government. Without that threat we have lost our voice in any and all future legislature. We need to get these greedy ********* out of office now. The only power we have is our vote with the threat of re-election our weapon. I've lived long enough to be one of those miserable old farts that has no faith in government to do the right thing. The government of the US and it's states is for sale to the highest bidder.
 

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Some of us are already paying , those of us that have to pay for Delaware boat license ! And i don't have problem with it .
But i can see down the pike when others states that have the money and do there surveys will start to get more share of the pot cause they do homework , and we get less i hope it never happens but i can see it
 
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