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Also know as getto sharking . Tld25's through 50's depending on where at what for . For the delaware bay channels , 25's with 50lb PP should be fine . 5'-10' single wire or 250lb mono , nothing fancy for the hard hat crew . Inshore for threser same would be fine till you hook a 150 lber and wish you had the 50's . Just get off the ball quick and stay on top of it . Good luck .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Da summed it up pretty much. Ill be basically dealing with brown and dusky sharks. But its a good possibility of running into some hammerheads and threshers. Id like to stay on the lighter side so I can have some fun with the browns, but id also like to be able to handle a thresher if need be.
 

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i wrote this a few years ago

Brown Shark Fishing – The Secret is Out

Catching the Fish of a Lifetime is Closer than You Think.

There is no need to run miles for good shark fishing. Why go to those far offshore locations when large predators are in your neighbor hood. Just make a short run a mile or two out of most NJ inlets for line screaming brown shark fishing.

Understanding the Brown Shark
The brown shark, Carcharhinus milberti is slate gray to brown while its lower surface is normally white. Its fins do not have any conspicuous black markings. Sexual maturity is reached at a length of about 6 feet while its maximum length is approximately 8 feet. Next to the sand shark, the brown shark is the most numerous of the larger sharks along the Jersey coast. In NJ, the sharks occur in highest concentrations during the summer months of July and August. Estuaries, bays and coastal areas are the preferred habitats of the brown shark. Their diet is varied, consisting mainly of fish and crustaceans. A large fishing industry has developed for the brown shark and they are considered one of the most economically important species on the East Coast. It is not currently, fished heavily in NJ but it is reported to be the most abundant commercially valuable shark taken off the southeastern coast of Florida.

Shark Tackle
When targeting brown sharks, I normally use a medium action rod combined with a reel spooled with at least 200 yards of 25lb. monofilament. Use a reel which can hold a good bit of line for those long runs. It is not a good feeling to see the end of your line then you hear “snap” and the shark is gone, along with all of your line and tackle. At the end of you line, tie on a swivel, then 2-3 foot of fluorocarbon leader in the 80-100 lb range. The amount of lead you choose will be based on the size of your bait and the current. I have found 2-3 ounces should be enough for most situations. The bait should not sit on the bottom, which means a large amount of lead is not needed. The last thing is a 6.0-8.0 hook attached to a wire leader. Pre-packaged bluefish hooks are a good choice.

Shark Bait
A brown shark cannot resist a fresh filet of fish. Most anglers who target sharks, will swear by a fresh filet of bluefish. This oily fish is a shark staple. An even oilier fish is the bunker. Always keep a few weighted treble hooks on board for bunker snagging.
If you are lucky enough to find a pod of bunker then snag enough to fill your live well. Put the whole live bunker on your hook. How could a hungry brown shark pass-up a wounded bunker ? It may be hard for some to believe but last season I hooked a 5 foot hammerhead shark while using a live bunker, 3 miles off the coast of Sea Isle City. Catching a variety of sharks off the NJ coast is common since many species of shark are present including browns, threshers, makos, blues and even hammerheads.

Croakers on the Menu
Another excellent bait for brown sharks is the croaker. Huge schools of croakers migrate up the NJ coast each summer. On their heals are hungry brown sharks. Find the croakers and you will find the sharks. No need to filet the croaker, just put the whole live croaker on the hook. When fishing in waters which are holding large amounts of croakers, there is no need to chum the water. A live croaker will be all that is needed for consistent shark action. Brown sharks will swallow a small 6-8 inch croaker in a flash but if you are using the larger 12-15 inch croakers then count to 10 before setting the hook.

Balloon or No Balloon
Balloons are often used by shark fishermen to keep their bait in the correct spot in their chum slick. The size of your balloon will depend on the size of your bait. Using different color balloons will help you and your crew when a shark hits. It will cause confusion, if you yell “it is hitting the red one” and all of your balloons are red.
I normally run 1-3 rods with balloons. Each at varied depths. After you start chumming the water, observe where the pieces of chum are drifting, so you can determine where your baits will sit in the slick. The balloon closest to the boat should hold your bait approximately 3-5 foot under the surface. The next bait which should be 20 feet away from the first balloon. This rig should hold your bait approximately 8-10 foot under the balloon. Repeat this process if more rods are used. To sum it up, the further away from the boat, the deeper the bait should be to make sure it sits in the chum slick.
Shark fishing without a balloon and chum is the easiest type of shark fishing. Grab your rod which is spooled with at least 25 lb. test. Put a live bunker or croaker on an 8.0 hook with wire, most tackle shops sell this type of “bluefish” rig which works just as good with brown sharks. Next put 2-3 ounces of lead on to make sure your bait does not swim on the surface. Drop your line down about 40-50 feet, put it in the rod holder and wait. When using this technique, you can fish for other species such as fluke on lighter tackle until the sharks arrive. If you hook a fluke, remember to bring the fish to the boat as quick as possible since a brown shark will make an easy meal out of a 5lb fluke.
When fishing more than one rod, make sure and reel-up all the extra rods when a shark hits. Sharks easily tangle lines and can make for a long day on the water when trying to untangle them.

Drifting vs. Anchoring for Brown Sharks
Drifting and anchoring each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. Obviously, drifting will allow you to cover more water and if a large shark is hooked when drifting, it is much quicker and easier to chase with the boat. The time it takes to pull your anchor or attach to an anchor buoy could cause you to loose a large shark. Covering more water while drifting can be an advantage but this could become a disadvantage if you are wasting time drifting over unproductive waters. I have found the best areas to catch brown sharks are around schools of bait and over structure. I mainly fish the waters outside of Townsend Inlet. Anglers who fish the waters off of TI, Sea Isle, Avalon and Ocean City have several areas to choose from when looking to anchor over structure. Aside from several wrecks, there is the OC reef and now the TI reef. These areas hold many species of fish which the predator brown sharks feed on. Find the bait and you will find the sharks.

Catch and Release
Ok, the shark is at the boat, now what do you do? On my trips, a thresher or mako will go in the boat. Nothing like a fresh mako steak for the table, but the browns go back in the water to fight another day. The small ( 10-30lb) browns can be boated. It is not much of a problem to bring one of these smaller sharks in the boat so the hook can be pulled but remember these sharks have teeth and must be handled with care. The larger brown sharks should not be boated. These sharks can be very dangerous. Once you are certain that the shark is tired, put on a good pair of thick gloves and cut the leader with a set of wire cutters. Try to get as close to the hook as possible, but don’t be a hero, getting an inch or two closer to the hook is not worth a trip to the emergency room. Before you target large brown sharks and decide on keeping one, please read previous articles in The Fisherman magazine on tail roping, gaffing or other techniques for boating large sharks.

Final Words
How many times have you hooked a fluke, sea bass or croaker and when it is almost at the surface your line starts screaming off the reel? This normally means a hungry shark or sharks have set-up shop under your boat. You could move to another location or you could stay and catch the fish of a lifetime. The choice is up to you.
 

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Brown Shark Fishing – The Secret is Out

Catching the Fish of a Lifetime is Closer than You Think.

There is no need to run miles for good shark fishing. Why go to those far offshore locations when large predators are in your neighbor hood. Just make a short run a mile or two out of most NJ inlets for line screaming brown shark fishing.

Understanding the Brown Shark
The brown shark, Carcharhinus milberti is slate gray to brown while its lower surface is normally white. Its fins do not have any conspicuous black markings. Sexual maturity is reached at a length of about 6 feet while its maximum length is approximately 8 feet. Next to the sand shark, the brown shark is the most numerous of the larger sharks along the Jersey coast. In NJ, the sharks occur in highest concentrations during the summer months of July and August. Estuaries, bays and coastal areas are the preferred habitats of the brown shark. Their diet is varied, consisting mainly of fish and crustaceans. A large fishing industry has developed for the brown shark and they are considered one of the most economically important species on the East Coast. It is not currently, fished heavily in NJ but it is reported to be the most abundant commercially valuable shark taken off the southeastern coast of Florida.

Shark Tackle
When targeting brown sharks, I normally use a medium action rod combined with a reel spooled with at least 200 yards of 25lb. monofilament. Use a reel which can hold a good bit of line for those long runs. It is not a good feeling to see the end of your line then you hear “snap” and the shark is gone, along with all of your line and tackle. At the end of you line, tie on a swivel, then 2-3 foot of fluorocarbon leader in the 80-100 lb range. The amount of lead you choose will be based on the size of your bait and the current. I have found 2-3 ounces should be enough for most situations. The bait should not sit on the bottom, which means a large amount of lead is not needed. The last thing is a 6.0-8.0 hook attached to a wire leader. Pre-packaged bluefish hooks are a good choice.

Shark Bait
A brown shark cannot resist a fresh filet of fish. Most anglers who target sharks, will swear by a fresh filet of bluefish. This oily fish is a shark staple. An even oilier fish is the bunker. Always keep a few weighted treble hooks on board for bunker snagging.
If you are lucky enough to find a pod of bunker then snag enough to fill your live well. Put the whole live bunker on your hook. How could a hungry brown shark pass-up a wounded bunker ? It may be hard for some to believe but last season I hooked a 5 foot hammerhead shark while using a live bunker, 3 miles off the coast of Sea Isle City. Catching a variety of sharks off the NJ coast is common since many species of shark are present including browns, threshers, makos, blues and even hammerheads.

Croakers on the Menu
Another excellent bait for brown sharks is the croaker. Huge schools of croakers migrate up the NJ coast each summer. On their heals are hungry brown sharks. Find the croakers and you will find the sharks. No need to filet the croaker, just put the whole live croaker on the hook. When fishing in waters which are holding large amounts of croakers, there is no need to chum the water. A live croaker will be all that is needed for consistent shark action. Brown sharks will swallow a small 6-8 inch croaker in a flash but if you are using the larger 12-15 inch croakers then count to 10 before setting the hook.

Balloon or No Balloon
Balloons are often used by shark fishermen to keep their bait in the correct spot in their chum slick. The size of your balloon will depend on the size of your bait. Using different color balloons will help you and your crew when a shark hits. It will cause confusion, if you yell “it is hitting the red one” and all of your balloons are red.
I normally run 1-3 rods with balloons. Each at varied depths. After you start chumming the water, observe where the pieces of chum are drifting, so you can determine where your baits will sit in the slick. The balloon closest to the boat should hold your bait approximately 3-5 foot under the surface. The next bait which should be 20 feet away from the first balloon. This rig should hold your bait approximately 8-10 foot under the balloon. Repeat this process if more rods are used. To sum it up, the further away from the boat, the deeper the bait should be to make sure it sits in the chum slick.
Shark fishing without a balloon and chum is the easiest type of shark fishing. Grab your rod which is spooled with at least 25 lb. test. Put a live bunker or croaker on an 8.0 hook with wire, most tackle shops sell this type of “bluefish” rig which works just as good with brown sharks. Next put 2-3 ounces of lead on to make sure your bait does not swim on the surface. Drop your line down about 40-50 feet, put it in the rod holder and wait. When using this technique, you can fish for other species such as fluke on lighter tackle until the sharks arrive. If you hook a fluke, remember to bring the fish to the boat as quick as possible since a brown shark will make an easy meal out of a 5lb fluke.
When fishing more than one rod, make sure and reel-up all the extra rods when a shark hits. Sharks easily tangle lines and can make for a long day on the water when trying to untangle them.

Drifting vs. Anchoring for Brown Sharks
Drifting and anchoring each has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. Obviously, drifting will allow you to cover more water and if a large shark is hooked when drifting, it is much quicker and easier to chase with the boat. The time it takes to pull your anchor or attach to an anchor buoy could cause you to loose a large shark. Covering more water while drifting can be an advantage but this could become a disadvantage if you are wasting time drifting over unproductive waters. I have found the best areas to catch brown sharks are around schools of bait and over structure. I mainly fish the waters outside of Townsend Inlet. Anglers who fish the waters off of TI, Sea Isle, Avalon and Ocean City have several areas to choose from when looking to anchor over structure. Aside from several wrecks, there is the OC reef and now the TI reef. These areas hold many species of fish which the predator brown sharks feed on. Find the bait and you will find the sharks.

Catch and Release
Ok, the shark is at the boat, now what do you do? On my trips, a thresher or mako will go in the boat. Nothing like a fresh mako steak for the table, but the browns go back in the water to fight another day. The small ( 10-30lb) browns can be boated. It is not much of a problem to bring one of these smaller sharks in the boat so the hook can be pulled but remember these sharks have teeth and must be handled with care. The larger brown sharks should not be boated. These sharks can be very dangerous. Once you are certain that the shark is tired, put on a good pair of thick gloves and cut the leader with a set of wire cutters. Try to get as close to the hook as possible, but don’t be a hero, getting an inch or two closer to the hook is not worth a trip to the emergency room. Before you target large brown sharks and decide on keeping one, please read previous articles in The Fisherman magazine on tail roping, gaffing or other techniques for boating large sharks.

Final Words
How many times have you hooked a fluke, sea bass or croaker and when it is almost at the surface your line starts screaming off the reel? This normally means a hungry shark or sharks have set-up shop under your boat. You could move to another location or you could stay and catch the fish of a lifetime. The choice is up to you.
Very nice article I even learned a few things.:thumbsup:
 
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