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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm still new at all this, and I have a really basic question. When casting heavier flies such as clousers and decievers, should I be slowing my casting motion down to prevent tangling? Last time I was down I couldn't get the deciever out at all, but had no problems slinging a popper 50-60 feet. Seemed like the deceiver wasn't following the cast as easily. It's much bulkier than the popper so I'm wondering if I might be starting the forward cast too soon? Any thoughts would be appreciated. I'm going back down to the shore for only the third time this summer and don't want to waste valuable fishing time unwinding knots! Thanks for any help.
 

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Reckoning, remind yourself of the most basic rule that you can't cast a line that isn't straight and it is not against the law to look at your line in the air. If you watch your line you will not be able to move the rod too fast, because you have to wait for the line to straighten out. Start with some smaller patterns and work your way up. Bill
 

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Reconing That must be a whaling deceiver if it is harder to cast than a popper. My guess would be you are starting the forward cast too soon. Watch the line & possibly get to the club meeting. I understand that there is casting before the regular meeting. Get with some people who know how to get the line out of the guides. Good luck & don't despair. Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to both of you. I suspect the forward cast timing is the issue. Unfortunately I can usually only get flyfishing at night, so I can't actually see the cast when I'm doing it. I guess I need to bring the rod home with me and cast in the yard. (the neighbors already think I'm nuts so what the heck?) I'm going to be joining the club soon and will have to arrange it so I can get down for a meeting before the fall striper run!
 

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Reckoning, the yard casting is a good idea, or if not enought room a park area. Sounds like you should be able to work it out and it is just a matter of timing.
 

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I agree, it's timing. I know exactly what you're talking about, too. The popper has more inertia than the bulky deceiver, so it tends to lob more and straighten out the leader moreso than the deceiver at the end of the cast. I do that, too. Practice is the key. On the grass, wait for the backcast to straighten out, even hit the ground behind you, then cast forward. This doesn't work too well on the water, though, unless you can water haul on the forecast, which I don't recommend until you know what you're doing ;) . You'll feel the rod load much more than if you start the forecast too early. It's all about the feel of the cast.
 

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On the bright side at night you really don't need to cast very far, if you can get 30 - 40' out you'll do just fine. Most of my fish hit as the fly is swinging down current as opposed to when stripping back (Blues being the exception). Get as much line out as you can cast W/O STRAINING. work the swing a few times and move down whatever structure you are working and work the swing again. If there is something there you'll find it! I imagine during daylight being able to get those booming casts out would be more valuable and possible.

GoodLuck
Wasteman
 

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Distance comes with practice. A long cast is a good thing simply because you cover more water.
As earlier said, many fish are caught "in spittin' distance". So don't despair...
Maybe casting lessons from Ed Jaworowski could help? I'm taking them.
 

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The old saying is the biggest fish are at your feet. At night keep casts short.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm pretty bummed out now. I was all set to go with short casts along the sod banks, but the wind didn't cooperate. The good news? Next Saturday we're planning on heading offshore so I'll have a go at some tuna. Now that should be interesting. What are the odds that if I'm fortunate enough to hook-up that I'll be able to bringa keeper in without a: getting spooled b: breaking my rod, or c: soiling myself?!?!?!
 
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