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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
-Scroll to page 2 to see what I ended up doing.-




Hi all. My name is Rob and I live in Brigantine. I have been lurking on the site since the fall and figured it was time I should join since I need some advice I can't seem to find via searching (most questions I can).

I bought a 21' seahunt triton last summer and had it in a marina in Barnegat last fall. I moved to the north shore of Brigantine in January and I would like to dock my boat at home. It is a rental situation so I am limited on how much I can do and would like to be able to tie up safely. Most houses have a lift, I can not afford that. There is no ramp or floating dock.

Here are two pictures that show the situation better than I can describe.


The terrible boat outlines are what I think are my four options. The BLUE line is the water line at dead low. My original idea was to tie up there as there is 4 pilings. Question 1. Now I am thinking not such a good idea as half my boat would be sitting on bottom, but I dont really know, maybe that's ok?

It is not a no wake area so I am worried about the off the end of the dock location beating the boat into the dock.

Basically the same for the other two positions as well.

I am not well versed with spring lines and have a hard time conceptualizing, not sure if they can be utilized or some other method I am not aware of.

I know my best bet is probably moving the pilings, but lets say I am not going to do that.

BTW I am planning on using either tideminders or tideslides. So the tide is really not my issue.. it is having the boat secured laterally and longitudinally.

Hope someone can help!

Thanks in advance! - ROB


 

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I would pu tit facing out on the inside, left side facing out. Use tide minders and a couple of whips if you dock it 1/2 in the mud you are looking for trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think whips are the product I am looking for... Do you know if its possible to rig them with a pulley and weight to make them tide friendly?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
After researching dock whips I found a product called dock shock by dock calm.. looks like it may also work.

Anybody have experience with Dock Shocks?
 

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Fender boards

I'd put the boat on the right side of the dock, bow out. You don't want to move the pilings because depending on how high the dock is you risk the boat going under the dock at low tide; not to mention its more work than you need to get into. Fender Boards: I don't see many people use this method but it works great! It provides a much larger area for your boat to safely bounce off a piling and I have used them during a hurricane with great success! What you will need is 2-4 medium fenders and a 8-10ft long 2x6. Hang the fenders over the side of the boat so that they are vertical and evenly spaced. Now drill at least 2 holes (1 in each end) and maybe a 3rd in the middle if you like. You will be tying lines to the board through these holes so make sure they are big enough for the line. Attach 4-5ft sections of line to the board. Now hang it over the side of the boat so its parallel with the top of the gunnel and midway down the fenders on the outside of the fenders. Be sure to leave 1.5-2ft of board extending beyond the outermost fenders to allow for movement and so the board doesn't work itself between the fender and the hull. You now have essentially a 8-10ft long fender to protect the side of the boat.
It can be cumbersome and not exactly pretty but it will protect the side of your boat from smashing into the pilings. This is a very effective method when tied up to a fixed dock with pilings outside the framework of the dock. :thumbsup:
 

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Good replies so far. The biggest mistake people make is allowing the boat to get stuck under the dock (or fender board) during the incoming tide. This will mess up the boat and the dock. I made long 2x4 ladders that go between the pilings in key spots and down into the mud to prevent this. Cheap to make and also a good place for the fenders to hit. Make sure the rungs are flush or the boat will hang on them. I didn't want to spend the money on whips, so I made my own with old fishing poles. Stick them in some strong rod holders and they are easy to remove.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Great! I have a lot more options than when I started the day.


I asked the guy from my last marina his opionion. He said he knew a good fiberglass guy.... very discouraging.

I appreciate the help
 

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I looked @ your dock on white pages aerial, http://neighbors.whitepages.com/search/neighbor_search?street=1300 e shore dr&where=Brigantine, NJ.
It looks like the 2 poles & everything to the right of the walkway are your neighbors. It seems there is a ladder @ the end of the walkway and that would be your best location using a combination of the walkway & outer poles. Maybe use standoff lines or tideslide from the outer pole to keep you away from the walkway with weights @ the walkway. Talk to some of your neighbors.
View attachment 54660
Good luck.
 

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That area is generaly calm and tying the boat up wont be a big deal except when we get a NEster. During a serious NE wind that area will sink a lot of boats. Ask the neighbors who have been there for a few years about your specific dock location. Bow out and self bailing should be able to handle some hard winds but if the NE gets realy crazy you want to pull the boat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys..

I don't know how I will do it but I have some options. I will post back.

Also.. Saturday and Sunday low tide took the water out past the end of the dock :huh:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Okay, so here is where i am at. I will definitely be putting the boat on the "right" side (from the house, from the perspective of picture taken above)of the dock at the end of the walkway. The position closest to the bulkhead is way to far up and I wouldn't be able to move my boat very often... plus I think Whaler1 is correct.. those pilings are not mine.

The other 2 positions... "left side" and off the end of the walkway I decided are not best because the pilings end at the level of the walkway. At extreme high tides there is a chance my fenders would be above the top of the pilings. The right side has tall pilings.

I am also quite sure I will be using either dockshock(dockcalm), whips, or/and fenderboards.

My main concern is now the bottom. The strong winds (I think out of the west) last week took the water out past the end of the dock at low tide. On any normal day I think I can at least paddle out from this boat position even at low tide.

Is the boat being grounded in the sand only during extreme low tides something to worry about? If so would putting some "rests" under the boat for it to sit on during such a tide be a good idea?

I was thinking of wrapping something like an old basketball pole in rope and laying it across a 2x8. Make 2 of them and then have something like this: (pictured with dock shock)(no 2x8 involved here just the "rest" itself)


These mock ups would be from the perspective of someone on the water looking at my dock and house.





Thoughts?
 

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TideSlides

Give Mark a call at Tideslide and he can go over the best way of using Tideslides on your case. He designed them and has them all over the world.

Also we are a dealer for them and get people at the shows come up to us all the time and tell us how they love them and how good they work.

If you decide you would like to order them let us know and we can normally save you some money on them.

www.tideslide.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Solved

Just in case anyone is interested. The boat is in the water and the problem has been solved. All in the project cost $330. Much better than whips, slidemoors, tide slides, or any other product I could find.

It is combination of the slidemoor idea with the fenderboard idea. Let me know your thoughts... pics below.



 

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If those two pieces of galvanized pipe are all that the boat is tied to then I dont trust it. That area can get beat up on a hard NE'ster. Why didnt you have piling put in on the starboard side?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for reply,

I am thinking I may want to get thicker pipe.. you may be right on that.

I am renting so I can just put in a piling. The landlord took out pilings that weren't being used because he was being charged extra by the DEP or something.

I am planning on pulling the boat out for big storms. You still think this is not a good setup?
 

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Looks good. Good job using the all-thread thru the pilings to secure the pipes. I would put the fenders on the boat rather than the board. That way if the boat moves some the fenders will stay with it. Nice job!:thumbsup:
 

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It looks like if the wind comes from the starbord side it would just throw the boat up against the galvanized pipe bending it over easily. You need some lines on the starboard side going to something solid like a piling .
 
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