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mako -- comments like this really encourage everyone to ask questions. good job on the info.

Welcome Full Boat -- skinny water is just a term used by some that means water depth and location. I use this term to talk about water far in the back that is fairly shallow (8-12 ft). This is my opinion everyone can chime in and you will see what I mean. Good luck.

BTW Mako it is posts like yours that prevents me from posting more in this forum. You are prob. proud of that though.
 

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why is everyone here so sensitive? not a criticism, just an observation.
it is a brief answer, but not rude. what's the big deal? at least he took the time to answer.

i would go even further in defining "skinny" water. yes, it is often found in the back bays,
but i would say it is even less water than bob described above.

on some flats, when certain bait are present, decent size fish, especially bass,
can be caught in less than 2 feet of water.

i nabbed these schoolies in less than 1 foot of water...
http://img108.imageshack.us/img108/2859/striper164yc.jpg
http://img65.imageshack.us/img65/227/striper172xj.jpg

as for fluke in skinny water, as you mentioned, once these fish find a comfortable spot,
it is common to find them piled up on top of each other.
look for areas that have water moving quickly against structure, but allows for eddies.
for example, the large cement footings of bridges often hold large amounts of fluke,
in my experience.
 

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I thought my answer was perfectly legitimate, to the point,.
and what I consider skinny water. Just because your info is different than mine and more long winded does not make my info bad.

[ 06-03-2006, 02:26 AM: Message edited by: Makojoe0317 ]
 

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I fish mostly shallow water. I would say it is anyplace you can catch fish during higher water but where at low tide you can't float your boat or any area where you have to watch so you don't wreck your prop or lower unit. There are many times at night that bass will feed in one to two feet of water and stay there for quite awhile, where during the day they won't be there. Blues and Fluke would be the exceptions the light doesn't bother them as much.
 

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Originally posted by Makojoe0317:
Anywhere the boat does not float.
I have to defend your post also, b/c your answer was pretty much right on. Skinny water is basically the shallows, the shallows that are really only fishable at high tide. Out of the way creek openings, coves, places where you won't find many shoobies in the summer. They can be very productive and at the same time a real pain in the a-- if you try fishing them at any other time other than high tide or close to it.
 

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People probably consider it different for fishing, but personally, from a navigational standpoint I consider skinny water that point around 3 feet deep where I say to myself, "uh, oh," and start tilting the motor up and keeping an eye on the depth finder. I also caught some nice fluke in that depth in the earlier part of the spring (keeper size, but had to send them back home 'cause they weren't in season yet)
FULLBOAT- welcome and good luck.
 

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during the spring and fall for bass, i find the daylight isn't as much of a factor as the moon phases.
also, i'm targeting any bass, not just trophies.

i find, the more tidal activity, the better the bite. the period after the new moon seems to limit opportunities the most.
while as, larger periods surrounding full moons will produce best.

please keep in mind, these are only tendencies for my channel creeks on the south-western end of long island.

i never try to force a spot i know is holding if conditions don't allow me to make my presentation properly.
 

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Alot of places I fish at high tide are dry at low. And at low tide you can almost count on running aground. I think, I run aground about 20 times this week. I look for quick moving water, that's smooth and has little rippels on the surface. Once you know what your lookin for it's alot more simple. Fish bustin the surface that's a dead give way!
P.S. A pole helps heaps!
 

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I think, I run aground about 20 times this week.


Sitting here LMFAO !
And i thought after all these years i was the only one who had to replace the jellcoat on the bottom every year :D

But 20 times this week :eek:
You want some tires for that boat!
Hahahahahahahahahahahaha !
 

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Originally posted by CapeMayRay:
I fish mostly shallow water. I would say it is anyplace you can catch fish during higher water but where at low tide you can't float your boat or any area where you have to watch so you don't wreck your prop or lower unit. There are many times at night that bass will feed in one to two feet of water and stay there for quite awhile, where during the day they won't be there. Blues and Fluke would be the exceptions the light doesn't bother them as much.
I agree! ;)
 

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Originally posted by the love from below:
Alot of places I fish at high tide are dry at low. And at low tide you can almost count on running aground. I think, I run aground about 20 times this week. I look for quick moving water, that's smooth and has little rippels on the surface. Once you know what your lookin for it's alot more simple. Fish bustin the surface that's a dead give way!
P.S. A pole helps heaps!
Yepper, that is what I call skinny water. That's why they made flats boats with poling platforms.

Skinny means very little water between you and the bottom. Around here I'd say 2' or less at low tide is skinny.

In sw fla you pole up into the mud flats 12-16" water for the big redfish.
 
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