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Anyone try smoking a striper? and I dont' mean lighting one up. I have seen too much "Grillin and Chillin" on TV this week.
 

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guy in up state new york do it, i tried it one time bought it off of a guy who catches them,only a couple stripers mostly eels, in a fish rack (stone fish trap)
 

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I've never done it but, a friend of mine has smoking down pretty good. He has smoked them & let me tell ya, IT'S DAMN GOOD! ;)

Smoked Drum is also excellent!

I'm sure someone on here can fill ya in on technique.
 

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Cousin has a smoker & I have the drum-any recipes for brining marinating prior to the smoking?
 

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It can be done, and is good. I don't know exactly how, I know it was marinated in wine and some other stuff and I know brown sugar was added to the mix. Was great plain or on thin rye bread with onion and mayo. I am sure some one must have a good method.
 

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Fellas,

Here it is !!!

Lots of different firm-fleshed fish will work fine.




Marinade

1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons fresh minced garlic

2 tablespoons chopped Italian parsley

2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary

Pinch of red pepper flakes

Salt and pepper to taste


Fish

2 pieces 7-8 ounce Sea Bass fillets


Pepper Sauce

2 red bell peppers

2 yellow bell peppers

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

Salt and pepper




I prefer a charcoal fire and if that's what you're using, start it now. Also, start a few wood chips soaking. Fruit woods like apple and cherry work better than hickory or mesquite and less is better than more.


FOR MARINADE: Combine ingredients. This paste-type marinade can be made ahead of time and in larger batches. It's useful for grilled poultry, pork, and lamb, as well as most seafood.


NOTE: It's much better to do the chopping and mincing by hand rather than with a food processor or hand blender. As useful as those machines are, for this type of preparation, they puree the herbs and garlic too much and blend air into the oil, making the ingredients burn at a lower temperature.


FOR PEPPER SAUCE: Roast the peppers over the fire, turning as the skins blacken. Try not to break the skin or you'll lose the juices inside the peppers. When the skins are blackened and will peel easily, close the peppers in a plastic bag.


If necessary, skin and bone the fish. Coat with the marinade and let sit for 15 to 20 minutes.


While the fish is marinating, remove the peppers from the plastic bag. Here is where a hand blender or small food processor works great. Hold the peppers over a bowl and slit the bottom, draining the pepper juice. Split and seed the peppers and blend the two colors separately in the blender cup or food processor bowl, adding the olive oil and pepper juice equally to both color peppers. Add salt and pepper to taste.


Clean the grill thoroughly and oil it with a cloth dipped in cooking oil held with a pair of tongs. Lift the grill and sprinkle a few of the wood chips on the coals. If you're using a gas grill, put the chips on a double-folded piece of foil and lay them on the lava rocks. Remember that you are flavoring the fish, not curing it, so don't use too many chips.


Drain the excess oil from the fillets and lay them skin-side down on the grill. Close the cover immediately to avoid flames, which will cause soot to collect on the fish. Cooking time will vary depending on the heat of the fire and the thickness and type of fish, but four or five minutes should be plenty on the first side. Turn the fillets, move them off of the direct heat and close the lid again to finish cooking.


After only a few more minutes the fish should be done. Remove the fillets to serving plates and garnish with pools of the two pepper sauces.
 

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smoked striper is pretty good and we have a running joke for a guy who smoked and ate the tongue. I guess it's probably a delicacy somewhere.
 

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I've smoked stripers for many years & it's easy:

Soak fileted pieces in a strong brine solution overnight; drain and dry with paper towels; place in stove -top smoker (about $ 60.00 at cookware stores) with soaked wood chips & cook either indoors (if you have a good stove exhaust) or on a BBQ grill (covered) for about 20 minutes. No need for a fancy recipie, the smoke imparts all the flavor you need. Hints: spray wire rack with PAM so that the filets don't stick & line the drip pan with aluminum foil for easy clean up.
 

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Ah something I know about.

Brine is the way to go (1 cup salt, 1 cup sugar, 1 gal water). But most importantly you have to dry the fish afterward (about 2 hours) until you get a tacky coating called pellicle. This is what holds the smoke. You can then sprinkle on some seasoning like paprica and pepper but it is not necessary.

Then smoke it for about 2 hours depending on the thickness at around 180-200 Deg. An hour per half inch works well depending on your smoker. Times vary. Bullet smokers work best but you can do it on a grill (see links below).

It will be the moistest, best tasting fish you have ever had. Works for any fish and it makes the best bluefish I know of. It's awsome at Thanksgiving.

Here are some good web sites to check it out. The 3men site is good, they are nuts.

http://www.3men.com/
http://www.recipelink.com/mf/17/204
http://www.starfishcons.com/pages/smoktips.htm
 

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I have made brines myself with different recipes but I found that the ones you can buy at Cabela's are just as good or better (and easier). I think they're called High Mountain. Jim Zumbo (outdoor writer) is on the back of the package. They come in assorted flavors but anything with maple and/or brown sugar is awesome. We also smoke mahi and make a hot dip with cream cheese, horseradish, smoked mahi, hot sauce, scallions and paprika. Serve with crackers.
 

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when I was in wildwood crest I was buying some crabs from a local. His next door neighbor had made a smoker out of a refrigerator and she was was smoking Spanish Mackeral. It was absoluately delicious. Tasted like chicken...
 

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I smoke striper extra strong. My wife makes an excellent creamy fish dip with it.

I "pickle" the fish overnight in a brine/spice/brown sugar solution- dry it then smoke it.

Sounds like you guys know what you're doing- so I'll ask a QUESTION- what is "pickling" salt? What is the difference between that and what I use- Kosher sea salt? Where can I get some?

Thanks
 

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I smoke fish a lot. Bluefish are actually the best. Stripers are good also. I soak them in brine made with Kosher salt overnight. I smoke them in a regular smoker using any number of different woods, Alder is my favorite, Apple a close second. I generously sprinkle the filets with Old Bay seasoning and then cover them with a thick layer of brown sugar. Amazing stuff when done, eaten while having a beer or two,3,4,5.. makes them taste even better.
 
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