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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The Fall migration is very well covered on this site but seems the like Spring migration slips by a little unnoticed. Usually Spring posts are about bass in the rivers but I'm trying to find the mass of fish working their way up the coast from NC. I only fish the bay/ocean so I don't spend time in our local rivers. Does anyone have any insight they're willing to share? I'd appreciate the help. I always feel as though the fishing opportunities during the Spring migration are shorter lived but perhaps I'm just missing out. Thanks
 

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Dear Mako 260:

Here's some Striped Bass Biology / Life Cycle 101. The spring migration is all about SEX. As Anadromous fish, striped bass enter coastal rivers to spawn and you'll see your "mass of fish" soon exiting the estuaries for the beachfront, where they, in post-coital hunger, collide with menhaden, creating some incredible fishing opportunities.

That's also why there is so much attention paid to fishing coastal rivers before May 1 ... because the fish are there and not in the areas where you are fishing.
 

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I emailed the PA Fish Commission on this exact topic

Thank you for contacting the PA Fish & Boat Commission.

Striped bass typically spawn in spring, so the run can go from the end of March to the beginning of June, primarily in the tidal freshwater segments of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers in Pennsylvania. The Delaware River is tidal from the state-line up-river beyond Philadelphia to Morrisville Pennsylvania some 55 miles. In the Delaware River, juveniles remain in tidal areas for 2 or more years before joining the coastal ocean stock of fish.

Striped bass remain in coastal ocean waters until they mature (males ages 2-3 females age 4-7 ) and return to natal rivers in the fall prior to spawning for over-wintering and then, in spring, continue their ascent to the uppermost tidal freshwater or brackish water to spawn. Some adults move above the tidal front after or during the spawning period; however, spawning activity or production of young fish appears very limited above the tidal front in Pennsylvania. Spawning and fertilization takes place in a flowing river at temperatures of 59-64°F. Following spawning most adults move down-river and return to the coastal ocean population, some however continue their ascent and very large adults have been caught far above the tidal front, above the confluence with the Lackawaxen River in Pennsylvania, which is 198 miles up-river from the state line, so stripers that linger in the river can be found throughout its length, though most will be down in the tidal area around Philadelphia.

Take care, Andrew Desko

Fish Bioligist
PA FISH AND BOAT COMMISSION



 

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Went over the Comm Barry Bridge saturday,had to be 30 or more boats in that area.Hopefully that helps with regards of the migration process is.
Looks like their feeding.
 

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A few bass then head up to Hudson's Bay Canada ( arctic circle ) to feed on baby penguin's before heading back south before fall ice lock up.

Last year, a 98 lb Striper was caught and released up there by an Eskimo fishing for arctic char.
 

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A few bass then head up to Hudson's Bay Canada ( arctic circle ) to feed on baby penguin's before heading back south before fall ice lock up.

Last year, a 98 lb Striper was caught and released up there by an Eskimo fishing for arctic char.
Holy penguin batman. And 98 pounds you know I bet if they hit 125 a striper could eat a small kid. Those fish really are something and eat everything they can get into their mouths.
 

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Does anyone have any insight they're willing to share? I'd appreciate the help. I always feel as though the fishing opportunities during the Spring migration are shorter lived but perhaps I'm just missing out. Thanks

It's not always hard and fast as to where the bass are, and which bass in which area along the migration trail belong to which stock.

However, as you study more and keep a log, you will start to see where and why they show up in certain places. Any place along the migration highway would be a good bet. As bass numbers have shrunk I tend to look for the most traveled places along that "highway". The problem arises when access shrinks as well,. and others have the same idea. When you understand the whole scheme of how and when they (generally) migrate, you can find some places that are not listed on every website,. where you might be able to find a few, and some peaceful fishin.....:thumbsup:





Mako and others, if you want to learn more.....do a google search on the terms below, with quotes

"Understanding Spring Bass Migration for NJ/NY"

"Spring Striped Bass in the bays where do they come from?"

Hope that helps in your understanding. Best of luck this season. :wave:
 
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