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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed some discussion on striper tubes in some posts. I wanted to provide the information I have on them.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: (Greer, SC - National Striped Bass Association) On February 25th and 26th, the National Striped Bass Association (NSBA) conducted its second Striperfest of the 2006 Striped Bass Magazine Tournament Series at Clarks Hill Lake. A total of 218 anglers on 68 boats participated in the 2-day event which was hosted by Thompson, Georgia, and by the Best Western White Columns Inn, which was located 9.6 miles from the closest access to the lake and served as the host lodging as well as the site of the weigh-in. A Barbeque meal was provided by to all participants attending the captains meeting and pizza was served at the Saturday weigh-in. Although the weather conditions included a lot of rain, the event was considered a success!

More Striper Tube Success! Do you know what 700-pounds of striped bass swimming around in a holding tank looks like? Do you know the feeling anglers get seeing their big stripers being held for release after the tournament? Do you know how much more impressive a 40-pound striper looks swimming around in a holding tank as opposed to lying lifeless in an ice chest? Well, our NSBA teams sure do! Remarkably, although the majority of the fishermen were fishing mid-lake, which was no less than a 45 minute drive by road to the weigh-in site, all 92-fish weighed-in by our Gold Cup traveling teams were weighed in alive thanks to the use of the Live Systems Striper Tubes promoted by the NSBA. What is more remarkable is that the live fish list included: a 45-pounder, a 41-pounder, a 38-pounder, a 31-pounder, a 30-pounder, a 28-pounder, and nine more fish between 20-25 pounds. Two of the above fish were retained by the fishermen as trophy fish to be mounted. However, the NSBA returned approximately half of the fish to the lake Sunday evening and on Monday morning; all remaining fish were returned to the lake alive with the assistance of biologists from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR). ?All the fish released looked very good and took off right away?, stated Ed Betross, GADNR biologist responsible for Clark?s Hill Lake, as he returned to the lake after the first trip. All in all, 128 striped bass were returned to the lake alive at the conclusion of the tournament event. Over 50% of these fish had been held in the NSBA holding tank and striper tubes for up to 48 hours. For more information from the GADNR, contact Ed Betross at 706-721-7410.
NSBA Forum
 

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This sounds like it has great possibilities, and more than anything else, if these fish can get shoved in tubes, carried to weigh ins and stuck in holding tanks before being released ALIVE in the lake there are a lot of doomsday naysayers that have a lot of explaining to do where they come up with numbers like 10% with C & R on school fish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Dave,

Here is just a quick list of some of the things we have done in freshwater thus far.

NSBA Conservation Initiatives

February 2006: The NSBA released 128 live striped bass after the conclusion of our Clark's Hill Striperfest. There were no dead fish weighed in my our Gold Cup TOTY traveling teams. Most impresive was the live weigh in of 2-fish over 40-pounds and 2 more fish over 30-pounds. Also, the NSBA designed and utilized its horizontal 12-foot fish-run to be used to revive and tag live fish for the future.

February 2006: Striper Kings and NSBA members celebrated the fruits of 3-years of project fund raising as members went to the SC Striped Bass hatchery and installed air lines to 10-more rearing ponds. These airlines increase the productivity of these rearing ponds by aerating them from below the bottom of the pond increasing the desolved oxygen content and prevent stratifying of the pond into layers thus increasing the productivity of each pond by as much as 30% and making the entire pond productive. Productivity measured by increase in fish weight produced per pond.

January-February 2006: The NSBA sponsored an article in the Striped Bass Magazine on the dangers of stocking non-native fish into local fisheries. The article was written by Jim Negus of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Commission.

January 2006: The NSBA released 138 live striped bass after the conclusion of our Norman Striperfest. Only 1-dead fish was weighed in my our Gold Cup traveling teams.

December 2005: The NSBA conducted its 4th National Championship tournament with required use of the striper tube. This forth National Championship event saw over 160 striped bass returnned alive to Lake Cherokee after being held for up to 56-hours in our holding tank.

Fall 2005: NSBA partner clubs (Clarks Hill Striper Club & Appalacian Striper Club) combined resources earned by participation in NSBA sanctioned events to purchase a new transportation tank to be used to transport and release fingerlings into Georgia lakes and reservoirs.

July 2005: The NSBA participated in a fishing club tournament on Lake Murray with the MSC, a full partner club of the NSBA. Based on results of the Striper Tube Study, the NSBA requested the MSC hold a catch-up to your limit only, no culling, no live release tournament due to the 83% mortality of released fish in the summer portion of the study. MSC agreed to shorten the hours of the tournament to reduce the number of fish caught, but decided to not push the no-culling.

June 2005: The NSBA and Warren Turner participated in the American Fisheries Sociery Southern Division Striped Bass Magagement Commettee as a participating and voting member. The purpose of the meeting was to work on a unified management plan for freshwater striped bass. Progress was made. Additionally biologists on the committee agreed to do a series of articles on striped bass management and striped bass issues that Striped Bass Magazine has agreed to run.

May 2005: The NSBA, after being notified by a local NSBA member of a proposal to allow commercial netting of striped bass on Lakes Norris and Cherokee in Tennessee, wrote a strong letter of opposition and organized support for business and local leaders from Morristown, TN. The proposal was defeated.

March 2005: The NSBA donated $1,000 to the Lake Norman Striper Swiper (LNSS) striped bass fishing club to be specifically used in their conservation efforts of improving their local fishery.

February 2005: The NSBA and Warren turner attended the American Fisheries Sociery Southern Division Annual Convention as an invited speaker. The topic of tthe presentation was Using tournament results data to assist fisheries management personnel in improving local fisheries.

2004/2005: CHSC and NSBA members celebrated the fruits of 2-years of project fund raising as members went to the McDuffie Striped Bass hatchery and installed air lines to rearing ponds. Airlines like these were installed in the SCDNR striped bass hatchery rearing ponds and were documented at increasing the productivity of rearing ponds by aerating them from below the bottom of the pond increasing the desolved oxygen content and prevent stratifying of the pond into layers thus increasing the productivity of each pond by as much as 30% and making the entire pond productive. Productivity measured by increase in fish weight produced per pond.

November-December 2004: The NSBA loaned 12-striper tubes to the Clemson Fisheries Graduate Studies Program for Shawn Young to conduct a study of both the mortality of striped bass under tournament conditions using striper tubes and to track and measure the dispersement of striped bass from a tournament release location. The results were very positive with over 90% survival of striped bass held in striper tubes. The movement of striped bass after release showed some interesting trends.

October 2004: The NSBA co-sponsored the Fishery Management conference held in Hilton Head, SC. This is where all fishery managers meet to discuss the improvements needed to manage our striped bass fisheries.

September 2004: The NSBA and specifically Warren Turner (NSBA President) became voting members of the American Fishery Society, Southern Division, Striped Bass Management Committee with a responsibility to work directly with the biologists in each state responsible for managing the freshwater striped bass fishery. He was invited to join this committee by the VDGIF fishery biologists!

September 2004: The NSBA started a column in the Striped Bass magazine that will be written by Wade Bales, a fishery management biologist., about the issues facing fishery managers concerning striped bass.

July 2004: The NSBA sponsored a research article dealing with the copepod problem facing striped bass fisheries in Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. This research article helped open the doors of communication between fishery biologists and the fishing community concerning this very serious problem.

June 2004: The NSBA donated $1,500 to the Georgia striped bass fishery through the Clarks Hill Striper Club (CHSC) by donating to the CHSC wildlife fund.

May 2004: The NSBA donated $1,250 to the Georgia striped bass fishery through the Coosa Basin Striper Club (CBSC) by matching their wildlife project contribution to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) conservation project to purchase and install forth (40) water quality monitoring stations up the Coosa River which is Georgia?s natural reproducing striped bass fishery and the source of the vast majority of the brood stock used to stock all of Georgia?s striped bass and hybrid striped bass fishery.

March 2004: The NSBA has donated $1,000 to the South Carolina striped bass fishery through the Midlands Striper Club (MSC) by donating to the MSC wildlife fund.

November-December 2003: The NSBA, compliments of Pool Nation, provided a holding pool with 6000 gallons of water and held striped bass caught and held alive using our striper tubes, for the entire weekend and released them at the conclusion of each of our Regional and National Championship events with an average survival of over 90%.

May 2003: The NSBA, compliments of Pool Nation, in conjunction with the Raystown Striper Club?s Reunion Tournament provided a holding pool with 6000 gallons of water and held striped bass caught and held alive using our striper tubes, including the tournament?s largest striped bass, for the entire weekend and released them at the conclusion of the event.

January-August 2003: The NSBA has donated $20,000 in material, cash, and services, to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) for striped bass fishery mortality studies in conjunction with the Midlands Striper Club (MSC). The Striper Tube telemetry study has been completed which shows 100% survival of striped bass held in striper tubes for up to 6 hours or more during the winter months. The blood study conducted jointly by the SCDNR and Clemson University showed that striped bass held in striper tubes during summer months return to their normal levels concerning lactic acid after being held in the striper tubes for 5-6 hours. However, the fish, although alive and healthy had a high mortality level just slightly better than the fish released at boat side. This study leads us to believe that an equally important cause of mortality of striped bass released in summer is thermal shock. The 2003 striper tube study recommends further study to try other apparatuses that would assist returning the striped bass through the hot surface layers, or to use tail race waters to return the fish to the lake.

December 2002: The NSBA conducted the first ever major live release striped bass tournament at the National Championship at Lake Thurmond. We provided every contestant a complimentary striper tube to use for the event to keep their fish alive. The results were that all 97 of the fish brought to the scale using the striper tube were alive and were held and released alive after the event by the Georgia and South Carolina biologist responsible for managing the Lake Thurmond fishery. These biologist said the fish were extremely healthy and should survive to be caught again another day!

January-December 2002: The NSBA started its tournament trail and introduced the striper fishing world to the striper tube concept!
 

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WOW is all I have to say.Maybe there is a way that there can be real tournaments for stripers, But this post has been on the board for 24 hours and gets no interest. It probably has to do why NJ doesn't have any local striper hateheries.

A few Charter boats in NC catch their limits and there are rants miles long. Some real honest science shows that these fish can and should be managed for recreation and no one takes an interest.

I guess that is why there is no interest in a lisence, because the NE puritans believe God put the stripers here and if he can't keep up with the demand too bad.

It seems like the Good Ole' Boys have it a lot more together than one would assume.
 

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How about some more info on the Tubes ..Please
 

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A guy was telling me yesterday that they had a 41 lber in one for 3 hours and it was released and it swam away as if was just caught.
 

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OK SOOOOOOOOOOOO HOW ABOUT INFO ON THE TUBES ???
where do you get them ?? How Much ??
Or is the content of this post to push the
NSBA ??

If its really about the stripers then Give up the info on the tubes,amd maybe some will give them a shot.Wouldnt that in turn help the stripers out?

[ 03-09-2006, 02:43 PM: Message edited by: VDAWG ]
 

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http://www.thebassbarn.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=get_topic;f=2;t=008330#000000

Originally posted by Guatemala Dave:
But this post has been on the board for 24 hours and gets no interest.
I put it up a year ago without a BOO. It was in my saltwater sportsman magazine when I first saw it..had some good images also, but I could never find the images on the web. this is the best so far

http://www.fishnsba.com/striper%20tube.html

[ 03-09-2006, 02:53 PM: Message edited by: design ]
 

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Originally posted by Guatemala Dave:
WOW is all I have to say.Maybe there is a way that there can be real tournaments for stripers, But this post has been on the board for 24 hours and gets no interest. It probably has to do why NJ doesn't have any local striper hateheries.

A few Charter boats in NC catch their limits and there are rants miles long. Some real honest science shows that these fish can and should be managed for recreation and no one takes an interest.

I guess that is why there is no interest in a lisence, because the NE puritans believe God put the stripers here and if he can't keep up with the demand too bad.

It seems like the Good Ole' Boys have it a lot more together than one would assume.
I guess they do they were thrown 20k for studies

January-August 2003: The NSBA has donated $20,000 in material, cash, and services, to the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) for striped bass fishery mortality studies in conjunction with the Midlands Striper Club (MSC). The Striper Tube telemetry study has been completed which shows 100% survival of striped bass held in striper tubes for up to 6 hours or more during the winter months. The blood study conducted jointly by the SCDNR and Clemson University showed that striped bass held in striper tubes during summer months return to their normal levels concerning lactic acid after being held in the striper tubes for 5-6 hours. However, the fish, although alive and healthy had a high mortality level just slightly better than the fish released at boat side. This study leads us to believe that an equally important cause of mortality of striped bass released in summer is thermal shock. The 2003 striper tube study recommends further study to try other apparatuses that would assist returning the striped bass through the hot surface layers, or to use tail race waters to return the fish to the lake.

This is based on hatchery rased Fish not wild right ??

what do you expect?
Do we have a farm raised Striper fishery here in N.J ?

Im not even sure where he was going with this post :confused:
 

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ok so do these tubes come in bigger sizes than 40'' are they for sale ?
do they need people to test them ??

Thanks DESIGN !!
 

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YO VINNY WHATS UP :confused: I AM GOING TO DROBS HOUSE TODAY TO TALK ABOUT TROUT IN THE WISSA. I WILL TELL HIM YOU SAID WHATS UP. I WILL TALK TO HIM ABOUT GETTING A TRIP UP WITH YOU THIS YEAR.
CAL
 

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Originally posted by KIDKAL:
YO VINNY WHATS UP :confused: I AM GOING TO DROBS HOUSE TODAY TO TALK ABOUT TROUT IN THE WISSA. I WILL TELL HIM YOU SAID WHATS UP. I WILL TALK TO HIM ABOUT GETTING A TRIP UP WITH YOU THIS YEAR.
CAL
yo yo sup kal how you doin !
yeah yeah i heard that last year

show him this and tell him what he is missing !!
That could be him LOL


[ 03-09-2006, 04:58 PM: Message edited by: VDAWG ]
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Guys,

I am not sure if this will answer more of your questions. You can always call me at 864-915-5348 or email me at [email protected]

American Fisheries Society releases Spring/Summer NSBA Striper TubeTM report " >>>
Study finds 100% success in cooler weather

From NSBA Reports

A study was recently conducted by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Fishery Research Group to evaluate the use of the NSBA ?Striper Tube? as a viable catch-hold-and-release tool to allow the culling of live striped bass during fishing tournaments. The AFS results are in and the findings of the study have shown 100% success in the cooler weather conditions (Mid-Late fall, Winter, Early-Mid Spring) and that NSBA Tube does in fact work. There are still environmental limitations that restrict the effectiveness of releasing live stripers during periods of warm or hot water conditions. Here are some brief bullet points of the study:

Summary of AFS Striper TubeTM report

? The Study was a spring and summer study, with separate results from both ? and separate analysis from both. The study states that during cooler weather there was zero mortality of striped bass held in the Striper TubeTM. During cooler weather periods, the study findings support the NSBA endorsement of using the Striper TubeTM as a culling device for striped bass on the water ? like largemouth fishermen do with the traditional live wells for culling smaller largemouth ? thus clearing the way for late fall, winter and early spring use of Striper TubesTM to cull live striped bass and to bring them alive to tournament weigh-ins.

? The Striper TubeTM performed as a tool of keeping striped bass alive in both study periods, but environmental conditions affect their ability to be used effectively during hot surface water periods as a culling tool for striped bass. The scientific study findings clearly show the recovery of striped bass held in Striper TubesTM? even during hot summer months when survival rates are at the lowest. This was done by blood analysis and charting of the physiological reaction of striped bass angled and released ? and angled and held in Striper TubesTM before releasing.

? The study states that further study is needed for tournament handling of larger striped bass (over 35 lb. class fish), and that the Striper TubeTM does indeed serve its designed purpose (even in hotter weather). This could also potentially be combined with an alternative method of returning the fish to cooler water columns to improve the survival of striped bass during hot summer periods. (Side note** the larger fish and tournament handling portion of this recommendation has been completed by Shawn Young via PHD requirements through Clemson University.)

? The study states that despite the recovery of the striper in Striper TubesTM, the summer mortality was over 80% and thus the recommendation from these fisheries scientists explained that the current creel and size limits are probably ineffective in managing striped bass (specifically on Lake Murray) during hot summer periods. The recommendation also states that a moratorium of striped bass fishing during the July?August period may be the best management tool. As an additional recommendation is to ban the release of striped bass during these extreme hot weather periods. In other words, summertime fishing means catch a limit and quit.

Summary and Actions: To summarize, the study can be broken down into two main findings. First the Striper TubesTM work and should be endorsed as a culling device in cooler water periods. Second, the study shows that striped bass that had recovered physiologically to near normal blood chemistry levels in the Striper TubeTM during summer periods had a better survival rate then fish released by the boat without holding them to recover in the Striper TubeTM. However, the mortality rate of these ?recovered? fish was still significant and should lead state and federal agencies to reconsider their current management programs for striped bass during hot summer periods.

The NSBA accepts and endorses the recommendations of the biologists including the increased restrictions during the summer.

? The NSBA will maintain its reduced emphasis on summer tournaments and will impose the following restriction on tournaments owned and sanctioned by the NSBA in the freshwater and saltwater striped bass fisheries.
Striper TubesTM may be used to cull live fish during tournaments for any period where the results prove acceptable, except:

During the period from July 1 to September 15, all NSBA and NSBA sanctioned tournament rules will be modified to state that the tournament ?Catch? limit is the legal creel limit and all participants must quit fishing and leave the water as soon as they catch a number of striped bass (includes hybrid striped bass) that equal to the legal creel limit for their boat. We hope our example will be followed by other striped bass clubs and associations. It is the NSBA ambition that the state and federal agencies will follow with fishing regulations that are enforceable.Background: In 2001 the NSBA announced its launch and introduced live-release striped bass fishing in a manner unprecedented before in the striped bass industry. The NSBA position was that this direction in striped bass tournament fishing matched the decision and example of BASS founder Ray Scott in the 1970?s, as a paradigm shifting move for striped bass tournament fishing that would allow striped bass tournament fishing to grow in popularity as a sport.

During the 2002 NSBA Tournament year, the NSBA introduced the Striper-TubeTM to striped bass fishermen as well as area biologists and actually conducted its own studies with remarkable results. In December 2002, with assistance from biologists from both Georgia and South Carolina, the NSBA conducted the first major live-release striped bass tournament as our Inaugural National Championship was completed with an astounding 98% live-release rate. ?These fish are in remarkable condition, and I see no reason why they cannot be released? said Wade Bales, South Carolina biologist. When asked if he thought the Striper TubeTM could be used to support hatcheries by allowing fishermen and tournaments to capture, recover, and transport the fish to hatcheries, Bales replied, ?I cannot be certain because I do not know if there has been a physiological change due to stress, but they appear to be vigorous and healthy and on the surface?I see no reason why they could not be used for brood fish, but before a hatchery could commit to using them, studies need to be done.?

The Benefit: While most tournament fishermen and fishery biologists were very interested in live-release and the Striper TubeTM, many reserved their enthusiasm, waiting to see if the fish survived after release. Tournament fishermen wanted the Striper TubeTM as a tool to increase their ability to cull fish in tournaments where creel limits were small. This would give them the opportunity to remain on the water and fish instead of being sent to the sidelines because of a quick bite. The NSBA hoped the Striper TubeTM could also be used as a tool to help fishery biologists meet stocking needs. As fishermen began to grasp the live-release concept for culling live fish from the boat, the concerns about the delayed mortality of stripers held in striper tubes continued to be on the top of our agenda. Although the NSBA believed the fish lived on release, no one knew for certain if they survived the long haul.

The Scientific Facts: It is the hopes of the NSBA that the facts will be used by all involved to move the sport of striped bass fishing toward the NSBA goal of responsible Catch-and-Release. (When reasonable survival can be expected in cooler conditions). Latest Developments: Since this study took place, an independent study by Shawn Young and Clemson University was completed concerning the tournament caught striped bass long term survival. It was presented to the SC Chapter of the Southern Division of the American Fishery Society in February 2005 and the NSBA is currently anticipating its official publication. This is the third set of scientific tests done using the Striper TubeTM.

Young presented his dissertation for his Doctorate Degree in Marine Biology by:
? Testing the Striper Tube under tournament conditions where fishermen, not biologists used Striper TubeTM and went out and caught striped bass, held them in a Striper TubeTM and then transported them to a tournament ramp, and
? Measured the survival rate of the fish by telemetry tags inserted in the abdomen and tracked the fish for 2-periods. The first period was to test the mobility of striped bass once released for the first 24-48; the second period was to track them to see if they returned to the area of original capture. Young tracked them for up to 6-weeks. A copy of the results can be obtained by contacting Dr. Jeff Iksley at Clemson University, or the SC Chapter of the SD-AFS.

Regards,


Warren Turner
President, NSBA
[email protected]
864-915-5348
 
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