BASS BARN banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just heard on the news that a scalloper sunk 25 miles off and the captain had to break the glass with his forehead to get out while he was underwater
anybody else hear anything about it
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,261 Posts
Scallop boat sinks in seconds; 2 men rescued
By JULIA GLICK Staff Writer, (609) 272-7213
Press of Atlantic City


ATLANTIC CITY - The Coast Guard rescued two men from a survival raft after their fishing boat sank 20 miles offshore in Wednesday's snowstorm, authorities said.

John Phillips III, 35, and Ian Iysenbach, 20, the sole crew of a small scallop boat called the Chico Bravo, struggled in 40-degree water for 25 minutes and shivered for more than an hour in a life raft buffeted by tall waves and hard winds.

"We bounced around for I don't know how long," Phillips said in a phone call from the hospital. "We just listened for signals and tried to stay alive. We had to cuddle together to keep our body heat."

The Coast Guard treated the men, who later went to the regional trauma center at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center - formerly Atlantic City Medical Center - with mild hypothermia, Coast Guard spokeswoman Petty Officer Kimberly Smith said. Phillips was in fair condition Wednesday night and Iysenbach was released, authorities said. Phillips said his pet Siberian husky, ******, drowned.

The 45-foot scallop boat sank east of Atlantic City at about 2 p.m., Smith said. It was taking on water, but neither Phillips nor the Coast Guard knew why.

Phillips, the captain, noticed something felt wrong, signaled to Iysenbach to get the life raft and then the boat plunged straight down, sinking in 10 seconds, he said.

The wheel room went underwater. Phillips broke the glass with his head to escape. Then he swam out from under the falling boat. The water numbed and burned his body, he said.

The men found each other and fumbled for 25 minutes in the rough seas to pull the cord and inflate the raft. Then they climbed on. The dog was gone.

The waves were 6 to 8 feet high, the winds were gusting 20 miles an hour and the oncoming snowstorm was clouding visibility, Smith said.

The boat's electronic distress signal alerted the Coast Guard that something was amiss with the Chico Bravo, and rescue crews set out from Atlantic City and Cape May. But a nearby fishing boat arrived first to help the stranded men.

The Captain Collet, a charter fishing boat out of Atlantic City, was heading back to shore because of the worsening weather conditions when the crew heard the Coast Guard dispatch over the radio. Ed Collet, the boat's owner, recognized the Chico Bravo as his dock neighbor and wanted to help.

Collet and Cindy Meloy, the captain, both of whom were trained in CPR and rescue techniques, asked the six paying passengers if they wanted to ride an hour in the storm to check on the distress signal.

They voted unanimously to go.

Meloy spotted a bobbing orange speck about 11/2 miles away from the distress-call coordinates. The fishing boat reported the new location to the Coast Guard. Then they rode up beside the life raft.

"The waves were huge," Meloy said. "They were just bouncing. You would see them, and then you wouldn't see them because they would be under the waves. They were just getting tossed around like ping-pong balls."

Collet and Meloy tried to help, but the scallop men said they were too weak to climb aboard the Captain Collet, Collet said.

A Coast Guard cutter from Cape May and a helicopter from the Atlantic City Air Station arrived 10 minutes later. The cutter sent a small motorboat into the roiling waters and rolled the men aboard, Smith said. A paramedic treated the men aboard the cutter as it returned to the Atlantic City Coast Guard station.

From the hospital, Phillips thanked the Coast Guard and the crew of the Captain Collet for saving his life.

Collet and Meloy said what they did was just good seamanship.

"Once we heard the name of the boat and who they were, we were not going to sleep at night if we did not go out there," Meloy said.

To e-mail Julia Glick at The Press:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,772 Posts
Hip Hip Hooray to the captains and the paying crew of the Capt. Collet! Thank God you were there to help. You sure did a very special and unselfish service finding your dock mates. I'm sure they and their families will ALWAYS be grateful for your heroic deed. We here at the Bassbarn sure are!

[ 01-20-2005, 03:06 PM: Message edited by: finaddict5 ]
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
9,261 Posts
Cause of scallop boat?s sinking undetermined
By JULIA GLICK Staff Writer, (609) 272-7213
Press of Atlantic City


ATLANTIC CITY - The two men rescued from a survival raft in icy ocean waters Tuesday have both been released from the hospital, authorities said Thursday. The Coast Guard is investigating why their scallop boat suddenly sank.

John Phillips III, 35, and Ian Iysenbach, 20, struggled in near freezing water for 25 minutes and hunkered down on a life raft for over an hour after their boat, the Chico Bravo, sank 20 miles east of the city.

The boat sank so suddenly, they could not don their survival suits and faced the freezing conditions in sweatshirts, jeans and socks.

The Coast Guard rescued the two men and brought them aboard the cutter Ibis to the AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center, formerly Atlantic City Medical Center, Coast Guard spokeswoman Petty Officer Kimberly Smith said. Phillips' dog died. No one else was aboard the boat.

Phillips and Iysenbach, who live in the Philadelphia area but fish commercially out of Atlantic City, were treated for mild hypothermia, Smith said. The hospital released Iysenbach on Tuesday and Phillips on Wednesday morning, hospital and Coast Guard authorities said.

Phillips lost his boat, his pet and all of his commercial fishing gear, Phillips said.

He said he did not know what caused the commercial boat to sink, but said the keel may have split in half lengthwise in the rough water.

Smith said the Coast Guard is investigating the sinking, but may not be able to determine the cause until the boat is salvaged. She said Tuesday's 20-mph winds and oncoming snowstorm may have played a role in the sinking of the Atlantic City boat.

"Commercial fishing is one of the most dangerous activities at sea, a profession with one the highest causes of loss of life," Smith said. "Part of it is that they have to go out in all conditions."

The scallop men had been fishing since 1 a.m. and were returning to port when the boat sank, Phillips said. Conditions had just started to become rough.

Cindy Meloy, who captained a charter boat that came to the men's aid, said the weather had been pleasant that morning. While the forecast had predicted a 50 percent chance of flurries in the evening, fishermen did not expect heavy snows and terrible visibility in the afternoon, she said.

To e-mail Julia Glick at The Press:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
Thank God that Someone was looking out for these guys, I happen to know these two guys personally. They kept their boat on my dock in Brielle during the season, always willing to help someone out when needed just launching it this fall after several years refitting it. Just goes to show that Safety gear is not a luxury but a life saving necessity... Speedy recovery John and Ian my daughter will miss ****** on the dock...
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top