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Interesting, but how are benefits factored in? And yes there is the days off. (although I don't worry so much about that since I know that teachers log LONG hours during the school year).

No wonder teachers will love this: it was produced by the teacher's union. That doesn't mean its right or wrong, just that they picked a stat that supports them.
 

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No wonder teachers will love this: it was produced by the teacher's union. That doesn't mean its right or wrong, just that they picked a stat that supports them.
I don't believe this is a chart that "supports" them, just the opposite. It shows teachers as being paid significantly higher average wages than the private sector.
 

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Employee making more than the Employer
 

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What do you consider long hours??
My wife normaly works 10 hour days, plus grading and making tests nights and weekends.


The one thing I would be interested in the numbers above are not what do teachers make compared to the private sector, but rather what do teachers make compared to others with a 4 year degree in NJ.

All teachers have a bacholers or better, but the private sector salary will be lower do to all those who work for minimum wage.
 

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I don't understand why all the debate about what teachers make. If the pay is so great, and the hours are so wonderful, why isn't everyone here a teacher?
 

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$63,111

$1705.71 a week for 37 weeks (185 days)

$34.12/hr for 50 hours
$42.65/hr for 40 hours
 

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A New Privileged Class
So how did we get into this dire situation?
It's pretty simple, actually. We live beyond our means and have made promises to public sector unions that we cannot meet — just as General Motors did, but on a grander scale. And we all know how things ended for GM...

In that regard, here's how newly-elected New Jersey Governor Chris Christie described the problem in his first State of the State Address. Speaking about the unfolding pension crisis, Christie said:
One state retiree, 49 years old, paid, over the course of his entire career, a total of $124,000 towards his retirement pension and health benefits. What will we pay him? $3.3 million in pension payments over his life and nearly $500,000 for health care benefits, a total of $3.8 million on a $120,000 investment. Is that fair?

A retired teacher paid $62,000 towards her pension and nothing, yes nothing, for full family medical, dental and vision coverage over her entire career. What will we pay her? $1.4 million in pension benefits and another $215,000 in health care benefit premiums over her lifetime. Is it "fair" for all of us and our children to have to pay for this excess?

The total unfunded pension and medical benefit costs are $90 billion. We would have to pay $7 billion per year to make them current. We don't have that money, you know it and I know it. What has been done to our citizens by offering a pension system we cannot afford and health benefits that are 41 percent more expensive than the average Fortune 500 company's costs is the truly unfair part of this equation.

All so a new privileged class can retire early with benefit packages that are on par with a lottery jackpot. Who knew these folks were paid so well? ... Certainly not most people.

Now don't get me wrong: I don't think is necessarily fair to place a huge target on the backs of these folks and fire away. After all, a deal is a deal — even if it's a bad one.

In that same vein, I agree with what Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger had to say about this mess. Regarding California's growing public employee pension crisis, Schwarzenegger said:
The cost for state employee pensions is up 2,000 percent in the last ten years, while revenues have only increased by 24 percent. The pension fund will not have enough money to cover this amount, so the state — that means the taxpayer — has to come up with the money. This is money that is taken away from important government services.

This is money that cannot go to our universities, our parks and other government functions. Now, for current employees these pensions cannot be changed — either legally or morally. We cannot break the promises we already made. It is a done deal. But we are about to get run over by a locomotive. We can see the light coming at us.
So what's done is done, and there is not much that we can do about it — except work until we are 80 to help fund cruises for folks that retired at 55.

But rest assured that when this train finally arrives, it really will run us over — just like Greece, but much closer to home.
Because standing behind all of this mess is biggest black hole of them all: your Uncle Sam, sort of like a half-assed zombie king... But that's a hair-raising tale I'll save for another day.

Until then what you need to realize is this: The status quo can not possibly be maintained.

In fact, it's fading faster than you think.
You bargain-hunting analyst,
 

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The one thing I would be interested in the numbers above are not what do teachers make compared to the private sector, but rather what do teachers make compared to others with a 4 year degree in NJ.

All teachers have a bacholers or better, but the private sector salary will be lower do to all those who work for minimum wage.
That's a good point about comparing to others with degrees

My wife works 7 hour days ( 8:30 - 3:30).. but there is also grading, lesson plans etc. which are done at home
 

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What do you consider long hours??
I haven't taught in 16 years, but when I did, I usually arrived at the school at 7:15, about 30 mins before students. Classes were over at 3:15. I coached, so I then stuck around most days until 5:00 to 5:30. I usually had an hour or more of grading/prep at night. Weekends there were usually at least one coaching event and 4-6 hours of grading prep, usually Sunday afternoon with a game on.

Coaching was an extra $1500 - 2000 per marking period. Since I was making about $30K, that was pretty helpful. That was the starting salary in 1988.
 

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That's a good point about comparing to others with degrees

My wife works 7 hour days ( 8:30 - 3:30).. but there is also grading, lesson plans etc. which are done at home
I agree. But if we are going to compare, let's compare the whole package. Once you factor pensions and healthcare, I bet some eyes would be opened. ;)
 

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I have 40 by Wednesday at lunch.
That's how I was the week of Valentines day. 17 hours on Sunday, 13 on Monday, 10.5 on Tuesday = more than 40 by Tuesday night. :mad:

I hate being salaried, and keeping track of our time is like a slap in the face, especially when I hit 75 or 80 hours in a week!
 

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I agree. But if we are going to compare, let's compare the whole package. Once you factor pensions and healthcare, I bet some eyes would be opened. ;)
Agreed. You'd have to factor in everything for it to be apples to apples :thumbsup:
 

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That's how I was the week of Valentines day. 17 hours on Sunday, 13 on Monday, 10.5 on Tuesday = more than 40 by Tuesday night. :mad:

I hate being salaried, and keeping track of our time is like a slap in the face, especially when I hit 75 or 80 hours in a week!
8 Saturday. 9 Sunday. 12 Today. If I am in for 11 tomorrow, I will have 40. :D
 
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